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  1. #1
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    Feb 2006
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    anyone have had a torn acl?

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    Can you tell me what happend and how it was treated?
    Long story short, hubby hurt his knee playing volley ball. We were winning and it was a great game till....well the pain went away fairly fast. A few days. But it hasn't felt right. Lucky for us he has not been in any amount of pain. Just certain movements don't feel right. Needs an Mri to see what is going on. But Doc said he could ride his bike. THANK GOD! He so needs to get on his bike. Cranky son of grumble grumble! Anyway. Like I said he can walk on it he can do a lot of things is just being extra careful. Any advice on surgery or no surgery? Really will welcome any advice. But this man has got to get back on his bike. He is driving me nuts. And Surgery is not an option right now cause we will be starting work. can you wait? So many ? Guess we should get the mri first and go from there?
    Last edited by Brandi; 03-13-2009 at 05:58 PM.
    Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.
    > Remember to appreciate all the different people in your life!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    2008 Trek FX 7.2/Terry Cite X
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    California
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    777
    My DH tore his acl and miniscus while playing basketball a few years ago. He let it go for a while, hoping it might repair itself (HA!), but finally gave in to surgery when his knee would pop out of place and he'd have to manually pop it back in every time he tried to do something as simple as get in or out of the car. I think the surgery itself took a couple of hours, under full anesthesia, and then he had to stay in the hospital overnight. He was laid up for a few days with this contraption that moved the leg so it wouldn't "lock up." He was also on some heavy pain meds, but didn't like how they made him feel so flushed them down the toilet after a day or two and just gritted his teeth. He had to wear a knee brace and be on crutches for a while as well. LOTS of painful physical therapy (which, after some time did include cycling). He finally got back to a point where he could play basketball and football and everything again -- his main goal. He REALLY pushed himself with p/t, envisioning his goal of playing again to get him through the pain. He still has to be diligent about stretching, but other than that everything is back to "normal."

    P.S. He had the option of having the replacement done from a cadaver or his own hamstring and he chose to go with his own. If you have more specific questions, I can ask him for you.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by michelem View Post
    My DH tore his acl and miniscus while playing basketball a few years ago. He let it go for a while, hoping it might repair itself (HA!), but finally gave in to surgery when his knee would pop out of place and he'd have to manually pop it back in every time he tried to do something as simple as get in or out of the car. I think the surgery itself took a couple of hours, under full anesthesia, and then he had to stay in the hospital overnight. He was laid up for a few days with this contraption that moved the leg so it wouldn't "lock up." He was also on some heavy pain meds, but didn't like how they made him feel so flushed them down the toilet after a day or two and just gritted his teeth. He had to wear a knee brace and be on crutches for a while as well. LOTS of painful physical therapy (which, after some time did include cycling). He finally got back to a point where he could play basketball and football and everything again -- his main goal. He REALLY pushed himself with p/t, envisioning his goal of playing again to get him through the pain. He still has to be diligent about stretching, but other than that everything is back to "normal."

    P.S. He had the option of having the replacement done from a cadaver or his own hamstring and he chose to go with his own. If you have more specific questions, I can ask him for you.
    Was he in pain before he had the surgery? Could he walk? And How often did it pop out after he did it in the first place?
    Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.
    > Remember to appreciate all the different people in your life!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
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    213

    I did!

    I tore mine in high school, acting in a play, but that part's not important. It hurt like heck when I first did it, had to use crutches that day, but it gradually got better and only felt weird or gave out sometimes when I ran or stepped off something onto that leg.

    I wasn't very athletic during that time (or I probably would've hurt it doing something other than acting) so I didn't bother to get it fixed until I was 30, when I became active and was bothered by the swelling and "giving out" sensation that sometimes happened when I ran.

    I had the type of surgery where they used the middle 1/3 of my patellar tendon to replace the ACL. My sister had the same thing, but they used cadaver tendon on her and her recovery was months quicker than mine. I think I was able to ride a stationary bike right away, but couldn't run for 3 months.

    Good luck to your sweetie. I hope he has a quick recovery, whatever the problem is!

    Kate

  6. #6
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    Apr 2007
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    California
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    Oh, duh! Yes, it was the patella they used for my dh as well; not the hamstring. Sheesh! And, yes, he did have pain, but could walk and go to work and such. The knee popped out of place more and more often as time went on.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Trondheim, Norway
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    1,469
    UK-Elephant has had a torn ACL. Skiing accident. Really painful at first, very hard to get back to the car from out in the hills. Was in a brace for the first weeks -- I no longer remember how many, but maybe she does. Once the swelling was down she was sent for physical therapy to rebuild the muscles before surgery. Then she just never did the surgery. She was a figure skater back then and that was her landing-side knee for jumps. Figure skating gives you enormously strong leg muscles and those seem to have stabilized her knee enough, although some activities can be painful I think. Not that that stops her.
    Half-marathon over. Sabbatical year over. It's back to "sacking shirt and oat cakes" as they say here.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Uncanny Valley
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    I injured my ACL in college, back in the Middle Ages when they had no idea how to do knee surgery other than to repair a torn cartilage. (Which they offered to do for me... so glad I declined!) Rehab was also extremely minimal. It's been a while, but I remember my bad sprains (that knee, a shoulder and an ankle twice) as being EXCRUCIATINGLY painful for 3-4 days, and certainly no picnic for a couple of weeks after that. Did the doctor compare your hubby's pivot-shift to his other knee, to get an idea of how loose his knees are congenitally?

    It was about three months post-injury before I decided (on my own) to start running again, because the inactivity was literally killing me and in those days the doctors didn't have anything better than "stay off it." By then it was snowy icy winter, so the way I remember it, it was a few months before I got back on the bike in any case.

    It's loose, but it's never "popped out." My knees are congenitally loose (common in women, and definitely a contributing factor to the injury), and the one I injured is only a slight bit looser than the other one. The kneecap tracking problems I have are really avoidable with good body mechanics and maintaining strength. I'm pretty sure that if I'd had good rehab, I wouldn't have even the minimal trouble with it that I do now.

    The last time my knee flared up (swelling and pain, no popping or giving way, and n.b., the "good" knee has flared up due to bad body mechanics too), I saw an ortho, who told me that at my age (mid 30s at the time) and activity level (anything short of a college or professional level athlete), surgery was not indicated. Rehab following surgery is 6-12 months. He prescribed a short course of PT for me, and by watching my body mechanics it's been fine ever since. That's been almost 15 years. There's been a lot I've had to learn on my own and am still learning though, so I'd suggest really doing his homework on finding a PT.

    That's the rub, though. Your post isn't clear whether money or time is the reason he wants to avoid surgery now, but if it's time, he's kind of SOL, because he's going to really need to make a commitment to PT in either case.

    Best wishes for a quick and full recovery, whatever he decides!
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  9. #9
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    Jul 2007
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    29 years ago I tore my ACL playing basketball. I heard 3 audible pops and then pain. When I crossed one foot over the other, my knee would shift which was a dead giveaway that it was torn.

    I am not eligible for ACL transplant or implant at this point, but if I had a recent ACL tear, there are medical advances to repair it to 100% use.

  10. #10
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    Feb 2006
    Location
    the foggy wetlands,los osos,ca
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    Thanks for all the stories. it is nice too have something to compare it too. i think maybe we are lucky in the fact that it hurt like hell the first hour he did it but that it seem to not be so bad after a day or two. And there was not much swelling if any. Except when my dh put the ace bandage on to tight!
    The mri will telll the tale I am sure and i willl keep my finger's crossed he can go without any invasive surgery. He is a hard guy to keep down so the whole recovery part would not be good!
    Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.
    > Remember to appreciate all the different people in your life!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    I injured my ACL in college, back in the Middle Ages when they had no idea how to do knee surgery other than to repair a torn cartilage. (Which they offered to do for me... so glad I declined!) Rehab was also extremely minimal. It's been a while, but I remember my bad sprains (that knee, a shoulder and an ankle twice) as being EXCRUCIATINGLY painful for 3-4 days, and certainly no picnic for a couple of weeks after that. Did the doctor compare your hubby's pivot-shift to his other knee, to get an idea of how loose his knees are congenitally?

    It was about three months post-injury before I decided (on my own) to start running again, because the inactivity was literally killing me and in those days the doctors didn't have anything better than "stay off it." By then it was snowy icy winter, so the way I remember it, it was a few months before I got back on the bike in any case.

    It's loose, but it's never "popped out." My knees are congenitally loose (common in women, and definitely a contributing factor to the injury), and the one I injured is only a slight bit looser than the other one. The kneecap tracking problems I have are really avoidable with good body mechanics and maintaining strength. I'm pretty sure that if I'd had good rehab, I wouldn't have even the minimal trouble with it that I do now.

    The last time my knee flared up (swelling and pain, no popping or giving way, and n.b., the "good" knee has flared up due to bad body mechanics too), I saw an ortho, who told me that at my age (mid 30s at the time) and activity level (anything short of a college or professional level athlete), surgery was not indicated. Rehab following surgery is 6-12 months. He prescribed a short course of PT for me, and by watching my body mechanics it's been fine ever since. That's been almost 15 years. There's been a lot I've had to learn on my own and am still learning though, so I'd suggest really doing his homework on finding a PT.

    That's the rub, though. Your post isn't clear whether money or time is the reason he wants to avoid surgery now, but if it's time, he's kind of SOL, because he's going to really need to make a commitment to PT in either case.

    Best wishes for a quick and full recovery, whatever he decides!
    The Dr did do the pivot -shift thingy.
    And no Money is not the issue. Even if we didn't have a lot we would figure it out so he could be better. Time right now is the issue because we are going to start our work season and he can not be out from it. So if he does have to have surgery it would have to wait till the fall if that is possible. He would do all the pt they ask of him no complaints. he is commited to keeping himself healthy. So as Long the surgery can wait then we will be fine. if he even needs it. By the sounds of it he has a pretty mild case compared to all the stories I have read here so far. So that is encouraging. and the fact the doc said he could go ahead and ride his bike.
    Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.
    > Remember to appreciate all the different people in your life!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Mrs. KnottedYet
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    9,074
    Torn ACL both knees but worse on the left, torn meniscus tendon both knees but worse on the left, arthritis everywhere so no surgical option. Also have a broken big toe and compression fracture of the spine but that's another thread.

    I tore the left when throwing Peter kokyunage in Aikido. He was supposed to fly out and away from me but nooooo. He took a high fall straight up, and straight down on my knee. I think my stance was not good because if it was he would have kinda bounced off but my knee collapsed. I was young and stupid and with inadequate insurance. Stuff like PT was not included.

    A few days later when it stopped hurting I went back to training.

    Had I known how the injury would effect me later on I'd have found a way to get PT. See my footer below.

    For now anything and everything that makes me stronger and/or more flexible is good. I have a program my PT recommended + exercises from Knott. I'll have to do these the rest of my life if I want to keep moving.
    Last edited by Trek420; 03-14-2009 at 08:36 AM.
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    Houston, TX
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    I tore my ACL 5 years ago skiing. For me, there was no pain from the actual tear, but I had a lot of swelling within the knee and was on crutches for 3 weeks while the swelling went down and I was able to walk on it again. Even then I had to be really careful how I stepped or it would start to give out. That is one the strangest and most wrong feelings, when your knee shifts and moves in directions that it is just NOT supposed to move.

    I ended up having surgery because I just could not trust the knee and at 25 I didn't want to be limited in the things I could participate in because of the knee. I had the allograft (cadaver tendon), but I didn't have a choice because my pateller tendon was too small to use part of it for my ACL. one of the main advantages of the allograft is the much faster recovery time, and one of the main problems with the pateller tendon is many people have a very hard time kneeling after the surgery (even years later), so given what you and hubby do, if he does have surgery that is something to consider.

    As for deciding to have surgery or not... I know people that have done both, and people that waited years to have it fixed. I think that the biggest deciding factor if it isn't interfearing with everyday life is why types of activities he wants to participate in....generally you can do straight line activities (running, biking) things that require pivoting can be more problematic (golf, soccer, skiing, basketball, hiking), so it depends on what you husband likes to do and if he can do these activites they way his knee is now.

    Good luck!
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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    the foggy wetlands,los osos,ca
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    These posts are very helpful in understanding what is going on with him and how we might handle it. i feel really bad for some of you who are suffering with so many other problems but am inspired by the fact that you keep going. cause if we stop we will surely die. Never stop moving you know?
    Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.
    > Remember to appreciate all the different people in your life!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    NW Georgia
    Posts
    399
    I tore mine skiing nine years ago, at the ripe old age of 41. I chose to have it reconstructed using my hamstring tendon (on the advice of my ortho surgeon). It was very swollen before the surgery but didn't hurt. I had the survery in April and was running again by July. Surgery and rehab were a piece of cake -- I had a little pain the day after, but none to speak of after that. Rehab was no big deal for me because I was accustomed to working out regularly. I will say that even though the knee is strong and stable, that leg is still weaker than the other, due to the loss of that hamstring tendon. But it doesn't usually bother me and I don't think about it much. Good luck to your DH, whatever he chooses to do!

    KB

 

 

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