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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13

    New Bike Semi-Assembly

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    This is my second bike, but the first one I have to do any assembly on and I'm nervous that I'm going to break something. I was hoping I could ask a few questions...for the record, it's a 2008 Specialized Ruby Elite, used.

    1) I'm having difficulty getting the quick release into the dropouts. I've e-mailed the shop I bought it from to find out if this was a problem for them. My Dolce does not have this problem and I was wondering if anyone else has had to deal with this.

    2) I can't seem to slide the handlebars onto the stem. I figure this is a tight fit, but it doens't want to go on as well; I've even completely removed the two bolts so that it has the maximum possible movement. My questions here are how much pressure should I have to put on it to fit it on and is this a part that needs to be greased, like the seat post. (I think it does, but I'm not 100%)

    The only other parts to be assembled is the saddle post, which shouldn't be a problem, and the pedals which are coming off the old bike. I know it would be easier to bring it to a LBS but I want the experience of doing it myself.

    Thanks for any hints you can give me!
    Last edited by Aiacha; 02-27-2009 at 04:27 AM. Reason: hit wrong button :)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Bellmore, NY
    Posts
    1,346
    I am not sure if this is a good idea as the Ruby is carbon and carbon bikes need to be assembled using special tools. Personally, I would bring it the LBS for safety reasons.

    ~ JoAnn
    2012 Specialized Amira S-Works
    2012 Vita Elite
    2011 Specialized Dolce Elite (raffle prize) - Riva Road 155
    Ralaigh Tara Mtn Bike

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13
    I actually just found some info that says "the stem will be attached to the bike" so it looks like they removed the wrong part for shipping. Well, half day today, and I was heading there anyway... <--(delayed gratification)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,364
    Carbon does not require special tools per se... you should not use too much torque though - you can break carbon parts, but you can break light weight aluminum parts just as easily.... so I'd recommend having a torque wrench for seat posts and handlebars.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Bellmore, NY
    Posts
    1,346
    Eden, thanks for clarifying. I new it was something different when working on carbon bikes.

    Aischa, I give you much credit for at least attempting to put it together.

    When your bike is all put together, best of luck with her. I have an 07 Ruby Pro and love it. My future sis n law has the 08 Ruby Elite and her 2nd ride was the Montauk Century Ride last year and did great!!!

    Happy & Safe Riding
    ~ JoAnn
    2012 Specialized Amira S-Works
    2012 Vita Elite
    2011 Specialized Dolce Elite (raffle prize) - Riva Road 155
    Ralaigh Tara Mtn Bike

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    996
    Some stems will be a pretty tight fit. You can use some grease. A coat of grease is good for just about any part during assembly!
    Because not every fast cyclist is a toothpick...

    Brick House Blog

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,414
    Most companies don't recommend using grease on carbon at all. Apparently there is a small chance it can react with the resin. I might double check to make sure you are assembling it correctly -- I have changed the stem/handlbars, seatpost etc on my carbon bike multiple times with none of the problems you describe.

    Wait... I just reread your post... can you describe more specifically what you mean by "sliding the handlebars onto the stem"? Are you talking about a roadbike? Typically you remove the faceplate entirely, so there's no "sliding" involved... or are you talking about putting the stem onto the steerer tube??? That might require gently working it on, but it shouldn't be difficult or feel at any point like it might just not go on... If this is what you are talking about, it's probably easier to install the stem on the steerer BEFORE you attach the handlebars... if the stem and handlebars are attached, take the bars off and just work with the stem/headset. You have to make sure you align it with the wheel. Once you have that tightened down, it's a cinch to put on the bars.
    Last edited by VeloVT; 02-27-2009 at 05:22 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    2,024
    Its laudable you want to do this on your own, but this is a very expensive bike and you don't want to ruin it. I think its best if you take it to the LBS, but ask them to show you what to do. To put a stem on correctly you need to know the correct order of assembly, the correct torque to use, etc.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13

    Update

    Heh. Well, I got home after pm'ing a friend on another board and he told me about a shim that Specialized uses, and that it might be easier to take the shim out, put that on the stem, then put the handlebars on it. I got home, thought I woud give it one more go anf zip, it went right on. I guess I was a little too tired to be working on it the night before. (I've changed it around a few times since then, and it seems when I had it all set right, it just slipped on)

    As for the front tire...we I had put the quick release bar on myself, so I'm the only one to blame. I still brought it to the shop. The guy played with it for a moment, then undid the quick release and pulled the spring off and turned it around..."You had the spring on backwards." He put it back on and it went right in.

    I'm chalking all this up as a learning experience.

    BTW - I'm taking it out today with the intention of riding. The 16 mph winds might tell me otherwise.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    291
    Congrats! Just FYI, the Ruby may have a carbon headtube (probably, actually) so make sure that you haven't over tightened the stem. If you do its possible to damage the headtube. On most modern bikes this is unlikely because of the mechanics of the headset assembly, but still possible...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by fidlfreek View Post
    Congrats! Just FYI, the Ruby may have a carbon headtube (probably, actually) so make sure that you haven't over tightened the stem. If you do its possible to damage the headtube. On most modern bikes this is unlikely because of the mechanics of the headset assembly, but still possible...
    Thanks, my friend sent me very detailed instructions on how to tighten the stem, so I think it's OK. I'm going to swap out the saddle with the Dolce, but I think I'm done.

    I rode it both Saturday and Sunday and I'm in love!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,364
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea View Post
    Some stems will be a pretty tight fit. You can use some grease. A coat of grease is good for just about any part during assembly!
    As far as I know regular grease isn't recommended for carbon parts - but you can get carbon specific stuff - "carbon fiber assembly gel". It works great - stopped my seatpost squeaking on my ti bike. It looks and feels like vaseline with sand in it.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

 

 

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