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  1. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    9

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    I'm a runner, and I have always had breathing issues running and biking up huge hills, I can do it no problem but my breathing is super hard, once I get up it I feel drained...but in a few minutes I'm right back to normal. I dont know why this is because I dont have asthma or anything and I love the challenge of hills but I dont know why I tend to breathe so hard going up them...I'd really like to know as well

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Black Hills of SD
    Posts
    698
    I have to count for inhales and exhales. I started that when I used to run. I now pair it with shifting back and forth between 2 gears on hills. Usually 4 to six counts. It takes my mind off the hill, reminds me to breathe deeply and evenly, and keeps me from gasping for air.

    Deb

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,889
    I've been wondering about the best way to handle hills, breathing wise. I DO have asthma, though it generally doesn't bother me unless I am either ill with a respiratory infection or around the combination of cats AND carpet (I can handle either individually, just not combined). In spinning class as long as I don't get up to that lactate threshold too often there isn't a problem with my breathing - but of course - spinning class is a rather different thing - as I am very much looking forward to finding out!

    Just picture me taking good mental notes of the best way to handle hills when one has lungs that can be a little cranky...

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    220
    Oh Catrin,
    I've been reading your posts, and totally think that you are over-analyzing everything! I don't mean this to be mean, but I really think that what you need to do is just to get out there and ride. You'll see what works for you and what doesn't. There isn't a specific formula for how to be a good rider. Everyone has strengths/weaknesses, and everyone does things differently to play to their strengths. My advice to you would be to not anticipate problems, and not try to plan for every scenario. Just be loose and relaxed on your bike and ride with a smile. Being relaxed really helps when quick/subtle adjustments are needed. And that is really it - just ride!

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I try to anticipate everything, too. Then, when something happens, I can spring into action. It's the nature of my personality to be a planner. While I don't think it's obsessive, it does make me feel more prepared. I don't think I was analyzing everything when I began riding, probably was because I just followed what my DH was trying to impress upon me. I listened a lot and asked tons of questions. I had been riding for a while when I joined TE and I listened a lot then, too.
    I am not a person who tries new things easily and I am somewhat risk averse. All of the women in my family, except perhaps my mom, were "afraid" of everything. I had to overcome a lot fear to do what seems like nothing to me now. All of the planning and analyzing helped me do that.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,889
    Quote Originally Posted by chicagogal View Post
    O... My advice to you would be to not anticipate problems, and not try to plan for every scenario. Just be loose and relaxed on your bike and ride with a smile. Being relaxed really helps when quick/subtle adjustments are needed. And that is really it - just ride!
    I am a planner by nature - indeed that is what I do for a living - long-range transportation planning Everyone I know, outside of my trainers at the gym, think I am nuts for doing this at 50 - so my reaction is, of course, to try and plan things out. It is just my nature - and of course life never works that way anyway So I ride every chance I get, and when I am on my bike I don't even think about any of these things. Thanks for your gentle reminder!

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    Catrin, you will find that people will generally continue with the "you are nuts" talk even as you prove to them that you are continuing to ride. My friends that I've had for years just shake their heads. It wasn't "nuts" when i went to the gym all of the time, but cycling is! I think in their eyes going to the gym is what "women do," but cycling is just too dangerous. One of them continually tells me what she "used" to do, like hiking, etc., but now she doesn't even want to sweat a little. I once went for a 5 mile walk with her and she came with a bath towel draped around her shoulders, to wipe off the sweat.
    Keep riding.

 

 

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