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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
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    2 miles to 10k- HELP

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    I used to run a lot but really stopped since 2005. Last year we did the Get Your Rear in Gear (Colon Cancer) fun run and the 5k kicked my butt. This year they added a 10k and I set my sights on that. See my Dad is a survivor and so was my Pawpaw, it is very important for this to be an event I do and enjoy. Right now I am only doing about 2.5 miles at the local trail but I want to be strong for that 10k. The run is March 15th, do I just amp up the distance on my runs? I have never done any formal training so speed workouts and stuff is really foreign to me. I have done a 10k but it was 2005 so I have been out of the game for a while. Back then I just ran about 3 times during the week for 3 miles and usually a 4-5 miler on Saturdays.
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
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    2,033
    I'm pretty sure neither you nor I are in the league where speedwork is applicable (I did hurt myself trying).

    Therefore I would just try to get the weekend run a mile longer each week until you hit 6, with the mid-week runs staying short.

    That way you don't go far over the 10% rule.

    Then you can maybe for one of the midweek runs find a hilly course which can replace any speedwork/strength workouts. You 've got 7 weeks to get there - so you have about two 6 milers by the end?
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    147
    Are you doing 2.5 miles 1 day a week or more often? That will make a difference in how you prepare for the 10k. Like alpine said, you do not want to go far above that 10% increase each week, nor do you want your long run to be more than half of your weekly total mileage.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,501
    That's intriguing, Rabbit.

    I know nothing from nothing. But I always thought that intervals are really beneficial for building aerobic capacity no matter what your "league." All the training plans I read online or in magazines include intervals, and it really seems like they've been helpful to me. Even though neither intervals nor anything short of rocket-powered shoes will ever make me "fast" in objective terms.

    I think the way to avoid hurting yourself doing speedwork is the same way to avoid hurting yourself doing anything else: form first. But again, I know nothing.

    The other thing I've been curious about is the general rule that says not to increase mileage by over 10% per week. (Hal Higdon actually says that more fit runners can take that up to 20%, but conservative is good I think.) Do you all increase the distance of your long run by 10% per week... or do you increase your total weekly mileage by 10%, which could mean loading all or most of the increase into the long run?
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
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    I have just started back running after holidays and bronchitis. In November before I got bronchitis I was trying to get it together for a 5 miler and was doing 3.2-4 miles two times a week, sometimes three. But that base is gone I am quickly discovering!

    I run at a local trail that is .8 miles, right now I just started back and did 3 laps last week. It was hard but I ran/jogged the whole thing. This week I am shooting for 3 times with the 3rd trip adding half a lap or probably a full lap. I kind of like to add in half laps or full laps because the markers are sporatic at .4, .5, .7 and .8 miles (trailhead). A lap is a lot more than 10% now.

    Eventually I will probably go to a longer trail that is on the way home but this one is convenient, well lit, our town is quiet and the trail right by the fire station making it nice in the winter when runs sometimes spill into dark.
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    3,932
    Good for you for ramping it up!

    I wouldn't totally let go of speedwork. You don't want to over do it. But you could indeed do some intervals, or hill reps, or a tempo run (warm up by running gently, then run faster for, say, 10 minutes, then gently again). The idea is to push your comfort level A LITTLE, and once a week. Don't go crazy or you might indeed hurt yourself. (Because unlike cycling, running speedwork can be tough on unaccustomed joints.)

    Otherwise there are gazillions of decent training plans for beginners online. I agree about adding distance progressively, and planning rest weeks (once every third or fourth week). And don't forget to taper (i.e. gentler week - but not inactive - before the race).

    Enjoy!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,940
    Hi Guys. I have been lurking lately and not posting, but I just wanted to comment on the intervals. I think that they are included in most training plans for a reason. They help.

    I think for newbie runners, it does not need to be repeat 800 on the track, but simply adding some striders to your workout, or hill repeats every week will benefit most runners.

    The key with the interval workout is that it should be a short workout for beginners. So like a 10 min warm-up, 5 striders with a 1 min recovery between and a 10 min cool down. Or a 10 min warm-up a few hill repeats and jog or walk down and a 10 min cool down.

    I have done them from the start of my formal training and they never caused my injury. I have only been injured by trying to increase volume to fast.

    And I think that the 10% rule applies to total distance. I run by time, so I am currently adding on five mins a week to my long run. When I start my intervals in a few weeks, I will add on intervals each week. I am a multi-sport runner, so my typical week during the season will be one day of intervals, one recovery run, a long run and when the time comes a brick workout.

    My healing wished to all the injured, I have a long sordid healing story of my own to tell, but I will save that for another day. I think it requires wine!

    Run on friends,
    Ruth

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
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    I don't actually understand the intervals. I never really did much formal training when I ran a lot before, I just ran.

    It would likely be beneficial to do hills since they moved the course and I think this area is a bit hilly. Do you do hill repeats similar to riding?
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
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    1,940
    Yes...hills are great!!!! Run up, jog or walk down. It does not even need to be a sprint. Just run up. The work takes care of itself. I LOVE hill intervals!!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    777
    I really love the FIRST training programs, but they are for those who already have a solid milage base. That being said, I found this link for a beginning program on www.coolrunning.com: http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/138.shtml It seems to do a pretty good job at explaining intervals, hill repeats, etc. Definitely take it easy on the those. When I trained for my first race, I was told NOT to do the interval training and just work on building up my mileage base (to prevent injuries). But, I suppose if you just take it easy you will be fine.

    Good luck to you! I know how meaningful it is to run a race in memory of someone you love.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    TE HQ, Hillsboro, OR
    Posts
    1,879
    Here's a plug for a run/walk program that I have followed several times with GREAT success. It takes you from day one to a 10K in 13 weeks. It's from a book called The Beginning Runner's Handbook by Ian MacNeill and the Sports Medicine Council of British Columbia. The book also has a run program for runners who've completed the 13 week run/walk plan. That program has interval and hill training workouts for runners who want to increase speed and endurance.

    I'd HIGHLY recommend purchasing the book. I found it incredibly useful. It puts the workouts in the context of injury prevention, has great info on stretching, warm-ups and cool-downs, etc. I also found it very motivational and an easy, enjoyable read. It's available on Amazon.
    http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-Runn...1778901&sr=1-1

    I tend to be a "seasonal" runner. I start running sometime in winter in preparation for spring triathlons, then I completely slack off until the following winter. So, I start essentially from scratch every time. This program has gotten me to where I need to be every year, without fail. Injury free.

    Week 1

    Run 30 seconds. Walk 4 minutes & 30 seconds. Do this 7 times (35 min) (run time 3:30)
    Run 30 seconds. Walk 4 minutes & 30 seconds. Do this 8 times (40 min)
    Run 30 seconds. Walk 4 minutes & 30 seconds. Do this 8 times (40 min)

    Week 2

    R 01:00 W 4:00 9 times (45 min) (run time 9:00)
    R 01:00 W 4:00 8 times (40 min)
    R 01:00 W 4:00 8 times (40 min)

    Week 3

    R 01:30 W 3:30 10 times (50 min) (run time 15:00)
    R 01:30 W 3:30 8 times (40 min)
    R 01:30 W 3:30 10 times (50 min)

    Week 4

    R 02:00 W 3:00 11 times (55 min) (run time: 22:00)
    R 02:00 W 3:00 9 times (45 min)
    R 02:00 W 3:00 10 times (50 min)

    Week 5

    R 02:30 W 2:30 12 times (60 min) (run time 30:00)
    R 02:30 W 2:30 10 times (50 min)
    R 02:30 W 2:30 10 times (50 min)

    Week 6

    R 03:00 W 2:00 13 times (65 min) (run time 39:00)
    R 03:00 W 2:00 10 times (50 min)
    R 03:00 W 2:00 11 times (55 min)

    Week 7

    R 04:00 W 2:00 10 times (60 min) (run time 40:00)
    R 04:00 W 2:00 9 times (54 min)
    R 04:00 W 2:00 9 times (54 min)

    Week 8

    R 05:00 W 1:00 10 times (60 min) (run time 50:00)
    R 05:00 W 1:00 8 times (48 min)
    R 05:00 W 1:00 9 times (54 min)

    Week 9

    R 07:00 W 2:00 7 times (63 min) (run time 49:00)
    R 07:00 W 2:00 6 times (54 min)
    R 08:00 W 2:00 5 times (50 min)

    Week 10

    R 10:00 W 1:00 4 times (44 min) (run time 40:00)
    R 20:00 W 1:00 R 20:00 (41 min)
    R 22:00 W 1:00 R 22:00 (45 min)

    Week 11

    R 25:00 W 1:00 R 25:00 (51 min) (run time 50:00)
    R 30:00 W 1:00 R 25:00 (56 min)
    R 40:00 W 1:00 R 10:00 (51 min)

    Week 12

    R 45:00 W 1:00 R 20:00 (66 min) (run time 65:00)
    R 50:00 W 1:00 R 15:00 (66 min)
    R 45:00 (45 min)

    Week 13

    R 50:00 (50 min)
    R 40:00 (40 min)
    R 60:00 (60 min) or complete your first 10K event.


    I am currently 8 weeks in (although I'm on week 6 of the program because I repeated week 5 & 6 due to illness, which wiped me out physically) and am doing great. Every time I do the program, I'm amazed at how I manage to progress through it. It's not easy, but it's very do-able, even by someone mildly overweight. As an added bonues, I've lost a fair bit of weight during the last 10 weeks, and some of that credit goes to this program.

    Susan
    Susan Otcenas
    TeamEstrogen.com
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,932
    Just a word of warning about hills:

    don't over-do it.

    (Simple piece of advice that applies to everything, you'd think.)

    If you've never done a hill workout, don't go and do multiple hill reps the first time... Although experienced with hill running, I went and injured my foot last year doing just that. I should have known better.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
    Posts
    5,295
    You know I think a lot of these tips will help if I am able to do the distance series in the winter. But for this run my goal is to enjoy and I feel like a success. I won races in a small city but Austin is running crazy. I want to achieve a feeling, not a time. My goal is to run the whole 10k which right now I could not do. Being able to walk that evening will be a secondary goal. And of course as I said this run is important for the cause, I am almost lost Pawpaw to colon cancer. My dad was sick as hell through chemo and it was pretty hard on me when he was diagnosed. I know my odds of getting colon cancer are slightly higher because of dad (Pawpaw was not biologically my grandpa). It is something I believe in fighting so the run is more than a run. I think I will do the gradual increase and once a week go a trail with a couple hills. I think the course is mostly flat but I should be prepared. Stay tuned.....
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,932
    If you'd like a lot of 10K inspiration, check out this link:

    http://www.vancouversun.com/sunrun/index.html

    The Sun Run is 10 K race in Vancouver in April. Last year there were 59,800 people in the race. Three years ago, when I first did it, I did not seed myself properly and ended up waiting over 40 minutes before crossing the START line, which means that who had won the race was already won by then.

    They provide lots of good tips on their web site for first-times and intermediate runners.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Grog View Post
    Just a word of warning about hills:

    don't over-do it.

    (Simple piece of advice that applies to everything, you'd think.)

    If you've never done a hill workout, don't go and do multiple hill reps the first time... Although experienced with hill running, I went and injured my foot last year doing just that. I should have known better.
    Great advice here.

    My job required me to pass a physical fitness test. I was in great shape strength wise, but poor cardio vascular fitness. I got a trainer, and after three months of him kicking my butt with intervals, distance runs, and hill sprints I maxed my 2 mile run.

    Around June I decided to run a half marathon in Dallas scheduled in December. I figured pounding out the miles just like before would do the trick. Wrong.

    While trying to ramp up the mileage and maintain running five times a week I ended up with a terrible case of shin splints. I finally had to take two weeks off to heal. After that I tore the facia on my foot, another two weeks training lost to heal. It wasn't until I finally cut my training back to three times a week with an easy day thrown in that I started making progress. By the time the half arrived I managed to finish in a respectable 1 hour 54 min.

    Just don't forget to take time to recover. That's the key to making gains. Keep up the intensity and remember it's the quality not the quantity of your miles.

 

 

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