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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    1,708

    Question Shoe Fit: toe room?

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    How much room do you allow for your toes in shoes? I mean the length from the longest toe to the end of the shoe...

    Seems like I have heard more than once that about a thumb's width space from the end of the toe to the end of the shoe. You can tell this by: 1) pressing on the toe box while wearing the shoe, or b) taking the insole out and stand out it, thumb width length to the end of the insole.

    I know ultimately the shoe should feel comfortable etc. I have had such an ongoing thing with my feet that I don't think I know what that is suppose to feel like anymore.

    I'm close to finding bike shoes "I think" work but I was just curious if TE bike folks followed this spacing, or not. I know it's something that I think runner's follow for their shoes.

    Just trying to make a decision if the shoe fits well enough to buy or not. Thx!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    2,704
    I do the thumb thing, and I try to shoe shop in the afternoon or evening, when I've been on my feet for at least part of the day. My feet definitely swell when I ride, especially when it's hot. For me, it makes sense to shop when they're a little bigger and to leave a little toe room.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Becky View Post
    I do the thumb thing, and I try to shoe shop in the afternoon or evening, when I've been on my feet for at least part of the day. My feet definitely swell when I ride, especially when it's hot. For me, it makes sense to shop when they're a little bigger and to leave a little toe room.

    Thx, Becky ...

    I had my podiatrists tell me the same thing about "when" to shop. When the feet are tired, achey, swollen, etc. If the shoe feels good/ok then it outta be good to go.

    I have a weird shaped toe box area foot that's very square. I find myself getting the shoe longer to try allow for this. But, this creates other problems that the arch piece rides in the wrong place. Well, now I realize another one of my problems is that I have been wearing my shoes too small.

    I just want to make sure I don't over-do it and get em too long at the end of toes. I think the shoes I tried recently at the lbs might fit the bill. They are the new Bontrager line of shoes. Man, the colors in the style I like is gawd awful ugly (in terms of matching my bike or gear), but gheez... I must say the shoe was a pleasant surprise in many other ways.

    Still thinking...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    I'm probably like you. My toes are long and my feet need a lot of support, so a shoe that fits my actual feet usually severely cramps my toes. Like you, I couldn't even really tell what fit. In the last year I've completely revised my idea of what fits and what doesn't. My last pair of running shoes was a size and a half bigger than I'd been wearing (plus they're wide width), and my new hiking boots are even bigger than that (plus they're men's boots) and my feet are happy!

    BUT, I don't think it matters as much with cycling shoes... my next pair of cycling shoes will probably be one size bigger, that's all. Even when I was riding lots of miles, there were definitely ways that my shoes had to fit in terms of arch support and not compressing the top of my instep, but cramped toes didn't give me problems on the bici.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,043
    Quote Originally Posted by Miranda View Post
    Thx, Becky ...

    I had my podiatrists tell me the same thing about "when" to shop. When the feet are tired, achey, swollen, etc. If the shoe feels good/ok then it outta be good to go.

    I have a weird shaped toe box area foot that's very square. I find myself getting the shoe longer to try allow for this. But, this creates other problems that the arch piece rides in the wrong place. Well, now I realize another one of my problems is that I have been wearing my shoes too small.

    I just want to make sure I don't over-do it and get em too long at the end of toes. I think the shoes I tried recently at the lbs might fit the bill. They are the new Bontrager line of shoes. Man, the colors in the style I like is gawd awful ugly (in terms of matching my bike or gear), but gheez... I must say the shoe was a pleasant surprise in many other ways.

    Still thinking...
    Which Bontrager style are you considering? From what I can tell from the website, almost all of them are black, with one or two coming in white. If so, then you'll blend in with most road riders. Beyond that, if your feet are happy, I wouldn't worry about the shoes being fugly. I've had really bad hot foot problems caused, I think, by too tight of a shoe come summertime. I would gladly trade some style for comfort.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,414
    Very interesting. I buy running shoes 1/2 a size to a size larger than my street shoes (they usually have a generous thumb's width of room, I'm quite particular about this since I have, ahem, sensitive toenails).

    But my cycling shoes have way, way less room. They fit more like climbing shoes or pointe shoes. My toes are all in a natural, non-cramped position with my foot flat on the ground, and I can move them a little, but I can't fully stretch and wiggle them all.

    However, I've never had numbness, swelling or discomfort, and I can't imagine how much I'd be sliding around if my shoes fit like running shoes.

    (I wear a 7.5 street shoe, an 8 to 8.5 running shoe and a 39 Sidi).
    Last edited by VeloVT; 01-06-2009 at 09:09 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,708
    Quote Originally Posted by liza View Post
    Very interesting. I buy running shoes 1/2 a size to a size larger than my street shoes (they usually have a generous thumb's width of room, I'm quite particular about this since I have, ahem, sensitive toenails).

    But my cycling shoes have way, way less room. They fit more like climbing shoes or pointe shoes. My toes are all in a natural, non-cramped position with my foot flat on the ground, and I can move them a little, but I can't fully stretch and wiggle them all.

    However, I've never had numbness, swelling or discomfort, and I can't imagine how much I'd be sliding around if my shoes fit like running shoes.

    (I wear a 7.5 street shoe, an 8 to 8.5 running shoe and a 39 Sidi).
    Thx for the feedback. Unfortunately for me I have some foot problems from too tight of shoes. My toe box is so square. I never thought that cramping them into my pointy Sidi would have been the cause of my neuroma (and other junk). The folks at the run shop said the same thing you did about the run shoe room. I do know what you mean about not needing the same room for the cycle shoes. I just wish I had some that fit my foot shape *sigh*.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,708
    Quote Originally Posted by indysteel View Post
    Which Bontrager style are you considering? From what I can tell from the website, almost all of them are black, with one or two coming in white. If so, then you'll blend in with most road riders. Beyond that, if your feet are happy, I wouldn't worry about the shoes being fugly. I've had really bad hot foot problems caused, I think, by too tight of a shoe come summertime. I would gladly trade some style for comfort.
    The white part I'm good with (my roadie girl is white/black/silver). It has a touch of blue. That I'm so so about. It's the brown that made me go "ewwe". I thought, "why did Bontrager put mtb shoe colors on road shoes?". But, as I've been checking out what spring patterns of jerseys Terry is coming out with there is... *brown*. Sooo... what do I know!

    The white one is a pretty light shoe. Which is nice. They maker a stiffer sole in mens. But, for the womens, that's a stiff as it comes. I assume if the line takes off for them, maybe that will change next model years.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,708
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    I'm probably like you. My toes are long and my feet need a lot of support, so a shoe that fits my actual feet usually severely cramps my toes. Like you, I couldn't even really tell what fit. In the last year I've completely revised my idea of what fits and what doesn't. My last pair of running shoes was a size and a half bigger than I'd been wearing (plus they're wide width), and my new hiking boots are even bigger than that (plus they're men's boots) and my feet are happy!

    BUT, I don't think it matters as much with cycling shoes... my next pair of cycling shoes will probably be one size bigger, that's all. Even when I was riding lots of miles, there were definitely ways that my shoes had to fit in terms of arch support and not compressing the top of my instep, but cramped toes didn't give me problems on the bici.

    Thx Oakleaf... I do not think I really have any shoes that "fit right" in my closet. I do like the insole that comes standard in the Bontragers. Pretty supportive for a stock. The new hiking boots I bought were mens too like yours. Funny though, I tried on the mens Bontragers and I didn't really notice a width diff from womens. That's too bad. Not sure if they make a wide. It's just the ball of the foot that needs it. It's about the closest I've tried so far though.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3

    Shoe fit

    Just make sure that the shoes are snug and use some sort of insole. Most cycling shoe related issues are from lack of support under the foot or the shoes are too big. Check out this you tube video on shoe fit. Yes thats me

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8X1sfbQSGA

    Hope this helps.

 

 

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