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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50

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    And I would only change the compact if I needed to later (if I moved or needed it for Itally or something). I definitely think the compact would be fine where I live (AB, Canada) because it's not too hilly and I dont ride in the mountains.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    197
    I would think real hard before you invest money to a bike. Changing a compact to a triple can be costly. My DH has a reg. crank set and was thinking of switching it to a compact. At least $350 before taxes and maybe more for other related parts he might need to change. It's a quite a bit of money.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,932
    Buddha_Bellies is right. It can be costly and not all switches are straightforward. Going from a double to a triple especially. (Changing between doubles can be easier, but certainly not cheap.)

    We're going with no racks (save for my 7-litre saddlebag and perhaps one on my sweet partner's bike as well) and... a car. (Although driving in the mountains should be fun.) Pictures to follow... in many months!

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,841
    Switching to a double will require - new cranks, new rear derailleur, and a new left shifter. And probably a new front derailleur. New cranks might require a new bottom bracket if it's not compatible with what's already on the bike.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    2,024
    I don't know about these particular bikes, but these are the things I think you need to be looking at for a bike you want to use for touring:

    1. Gearing. I tour with a 50/34 front, 11/34 rear, but can understand why some prefer a triple, especially for serious mountains and serious weight. Run the numbers through a gear calculator, and based on your abilities and the terrain make a choice.

    2. Eyelets for racks and fenders if desired.

    3. Accomodate wider tires for touring (28-32).

    4. Comfort/fit.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    Thanks for all the help! I decided to go for the Giant Avail 1 (green/white). It has eyelets on the back, a triple crankset and Shimano 105s. I went with an xs because the reach on the small felt a bit long. I haven't been able to take it out for a long ride though because it's snowing now!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,932
    Exciting stuff!

    Can't wait to see pics of your touring trips!

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    197
    Congrats! We want photos!!!

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    where the wind comes sweeping down the plain
    Posts
    5,251
    Can't wait to see it all decked out for touring. I'm sure there will be many, many adventures to tell us all about...
    Check out my running blog: www.turtlepacing.blogspot.com

    Cervelo P2C (tri bike)
    Bianchi Eros (commuter/touring road bike)

    1983 Motobecane mixte (commuter/errand bike)
    Cannondale F5 mountain bike

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    Thanks! It will probably be a while before it's going to be loaded, but I like that it has rear eyelets I will post a pic of it soon!
    I'm thinking of switching the bar tape to something fun. It's white right now and the bike is white/green right now (like grass/primary green), so I wonder if celeste would work for a colour to go with it. I like pink, but it would be too 'Easter' I think

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    403
    Sorry guys, I have been away for a while... I was moving... I HATE moving. Anyway, I did credit card tour in Austria, but I brought a very small one person tent (maybe would go with a small two person next time - one person is TOO small), blow up squshy pad and pillow and a sleeping bag. I'm glad I did too, because I didn't have reservations at all (you just kind of stop at whatever road house people recommend), and the first night I arrived around 9pm to find out that there was no room at the inn. Rather than sleeping in the barn... they let me camp (they didn't have a barn).

    So, I have recently been experiencing the oddities associated with triple chain rings. I like having a triple, but due to the small size that most women ride and therefore the shorter wheel base, I guess the geometry is odd on the triples from time to time. What I mean is, in my middle chain ring (in front), I thought I could use all the cogs in the rear, but on my road bike, I cannot. When I get to the biggest cogs in the rear (i.e., the easiest gears), I start experiencing problems. Apparently with the geometry of the bike, this configuration acts sort of like being cross chained. Would I go with a double next time? good question... I like the various gearing ratios of the triple, but you have to be more careful. Having said that, my touring bike doesn't have the same problems, but the wheel base is significantly longer.

    I also would love to see picts

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,932
    Quote Originally Posted by ginny View Post
    I like having a triple, but due to the small size that most women ride and therefore the shorter wheel base, I guess the geometry is odd on the triples from time to time. What I mean is, in my middle chain ring (in front), I thought I could use all the cogs in the rear, but on my road bike, I cannot. When I get to the biggest cogs in the rear (i.e., the easiest gears), I start experiencing problems. Apparently with the geometry of the bike, this configuration acts sort of like being cross chained.
    Being in the middle chainring + biggest or smallest cog in the back will definitely induce rubbing of the chain on the derailer cage, and should be avoided. I don't think that's especially specific to small bikes, but I can see how it could be made worse by a shorter chain.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    Here is a picture of my new bike. I would like to change the bar tape sometime to make it 'unique' but not sure what colour yet. Maybe a light purple to make it girly, or maybe a celeste green?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  14. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,932
    Veeerrrrrrry pretty! Great purchase!

    Have you ridden it on the road yet?

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    where the wind comes sweeping down the plain
    Posts
    5,251
    I love the sleek lines and the green. Really stands out! Purple might look neat with the green (I guess it depends on the shade), but a brown leather tape might look really classy also. Hmmmm... decisions, decisions...
    Check out my running blog: www.turtlepacing.blogspot.com

    Cervelo P2C (tri bike)
    Bianchi Eros (commuter/touring road bike)

    1983 Motobecane mixte (commuter/errand bike)
    Cannondale F5 mountain bike

 

 

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