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Thread: Winter Clothing

  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
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    400

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    If you are truly allergic to wool than the itchiness of the wool is irrelevant and you would get hives even from the softest wool. Avoid it altogether.

    If you are just sensitive to itchy fabrics, then merino wool is a good way to go. I personally prefer Icebreaker merino as the least itchy. I think it has to do with the fine weave they use.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, OR
    Posts
    5,023
    I had my first *cold* commute this morning and I have a product rave.

    First off, my attire: I wore a new Icebreaker 1/2 zip top under a wind shell jacket. I would have loved to add a wool bra to the outfit, but I don't have one yet. I was amazingly dry when I got to work (20 mile ride), and that surprised me. The new top is definitely top notch.

    On the bottom, I just wore a pair of terry cycling tights. They were ok while riding, but man, were my legs cold once I got to work!

    I had on smartwool socks (too thick) and mtb shoes (too tight) so I had cold toes. I need to put on thinner socks and toe warmers and I'm sure I'll be fine. On my head, I wore just a regular buff. I would have liked to have had it pulled over my face for the first 10 minutes or so, but I forgot to do so and I didn't want to stop to adjust it. After that, I warmed up enough that it was fine just on my head and over my ears.

    And now, for the rave: I had on a new pair of PI Gavia gloves I bought at REI last week. I haven't been able to find my regular long fingered gloves since we moved, so I bought a new pair. I splurged a little on these ($45) because they will shed water and my other gloves won't (should I ever find them). I tried on the womens and the mens and ended up going with a men's small over the women's medium. Both fit ok, but the men's smalls were slightly roomier so that I can wear my wool liners under them should it be REALLY cold. Today I wore them without liners and they were PERFECT! It was 35 degrees when we left (and dark and foggy) and my fingers were toasty warm the entire ride. I'm really, really impresssed because even when my hands are warm enough for 30-60 minute rides, they always got cold after an hour. Not today. Even 90 minutes into the ride, my hands felt comfortable. I'm really curious to try these in the rain, next.
    My new non-farm blog: Finding Freedom

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,516
    GLC-

    Thanks for the review on the gloves - I had wondered how they would work - I have the AmFibs (too bulky for NC) and some lighter gloves in which my hands freeze.

    CA
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,054
    What are the warmest gloves? My hands are usually the first thing to get cold. I don't care for mittens. Thanks
    2011 Specialized Secteur Elite Comp
    2006 Trek 7100

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,403
    I have yet to find gloves that can stand up to 25F 25mph for 2-3 hours.
    What I do is layer various gloves instead....thin wool liners, windstopper biking gloves with goretex, then big men's ski gloves with windstopper on top of those 2. Once I wore 4 pairs of gloves and that worked pretty well.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,516
    Quote Originally Posted by surgtech1956 View Post
    What are the warmest gloves? My hands are usually the first thing to get cold. I don't care for mittens. Thanks
    Probably lobster claw amfibs. But you still may want warmers/liners if you're particularly cold natured, depending on the weather. Some people use the snow mobile things (I forget what they're called). I was reading about a tour of AK at ridiculously cold temps, and that's what they used.
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    GLC1968 - you need two Buffs I wear one doubled up under my helmet as a skullcap or just covering my ears (until it's cold enough to wear a real skullcap) and one around my neck as a neck gaiter. I pull the neck one up over my nose in the beginning and going down hills, and just pull it down again when I start to warm up.

    I'm just re-remembering how thin socks and shoe covers are better than thick socks too... but haven't broken out the winter shoes yet.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,403
    Quote Originally Posted by lph View Post
    GLC1968 - you need two Buffs I wear one doubled up under my helmet as a skullcap or just covering my ears (until it's cold enough to wear a real skullcap) and one around my neck as a neck gaiter. I pull the neck one up over my nose in the beginning and going down hills, and just pull it down again when I start to warm up.
    I do the same things with my Louis Garneau balaclava:
    http://www.teamestrogen.com/prodLG_1014002.html

    It's very thin and silky but warm, and it's stretchy....so I can wear it three ways:
    As a full coverage balaclava covering my nose and mouth
    Pulled down under my mouth or chin so it leaves my face exposed
    Or pull it back down off my head, tuck the hood in a bit and wear it like a cozy turtleneck- it's thin enough to do all these things, yet for some reason it's quite warm. It rolls up very small too, to tuck in my saddlebag or pocket.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  9. #24
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, OR
    Posts
    5,023
    LPH and BSG - I've done both of what you suggested in the past in temps below 20F. Thing is, once I get moving, I hate having my neck covered....I just get too hot. And this is ONLY when I'm exercising, otherwise I'm a big fan of turtlenecks and scarves and such for non-active situations.

    What I need is a jacket with a big stand up collar. Then I can wear it up over my lower face while I'm cold and then unzip it down to my chest as I warm up. I actually kind of did this with my Icebreaker top. If the neck were slightly longer, it would have been perfect!

    CA - yeah, I looked at the amfib gloves and they seemed too much for me. I'd rather just layer in a wool or cashmere liner if it's really cold. I even have amfib booties that I've never used...I just don't get THAT cold (usually).
    My new non-farm blog: Finding Freedom

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,516
    Quote Originally Posted by GLC1968 View Post
    CA - yeah, I looked at the amfib gloves and they seemed too much for me. I'd rather just layer in a wool or cashmere liner if it's really cold. I even have amfib booties that I've never used...I just don't get THAT cold (usually).
    I do like the booties. And the tights. But don't wear the tights when it's above 40 or you'll burn up!

    CA
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    84

    Icebreaker Wool Base Layers

    Steep and cheap were offering these about once a week and they are an excellent base layer (and very attractive on)! I think I paid $24 + $8 SH.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,054
    Can anyone recommend Patagonia Capilene? Thank you
    2011 Specialized Secteur Elite Comp
    2006 Trek 7100

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    1,071
    First and foremost, thanks much to LPH for the two-buff suggestion. We are getting cold weather (below 40) earlier than usual, much to my chagrin, so I'm re-acclimating physically and mentally.

    I love Capilene but I am a Patagonia addict. . I usually don't wear it for bike riding, just hiking. That said, this week I broke out a mid-weight capilene jersey as a second layer. Worked like a champ.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    Glad to hear it! I have a couple of balaclavas and use them occasionally, but the skullcap/Buff + neck gaiter Buff solution is a bit more versatile on the move and feels a bit more compatible with longish hair. And I really like being able to cover my nose completely on long descents.

    I'm having fun actually, trying out all the gear combos I've noted down earlier and finding out that yes, they stil work The challenge is getting dressed in the morning in stuff that will work both for a cold morning commute and for a mild afternoon commute.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Lubbock, TX
    Posts
    89
    +1 for Patagonia Capilene. It's a bit of an investment but well worth it. The tops are great for cycling.

    I'm sure the bottoms would be also, but I haven't worn those during cycling, so I'm not sure if the stitching locations would cause any problems in the saddle or not.

 

 

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