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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    378

    Is 22 Pounds Too Heavy?

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    I'm considering getting a cross bike so I have something to ride when the roads are too salty, wet, and slushy for my road bike. Also, I'd like to give cross racing a shot. There is a series of races right around here and I think it could be a lot of fun.

    I don't want to spend more than $1500 on the bike. Today, I rode a 49 cm 2009 Kona Jake the Snake. I liked the way the bike fit, but it weighs 22 pounds and I'm wondering if that is just too heavy. Bear in mind that I can't even do one real pushup. One of the things I'm working on now is upper body strength, and let's just say there's a lot of room for improvement.

    I also rode a 2007 Felt. It was two pounds lighter and I could easily tell the difference. The Felt was a 51, though, and it was too big.

    I'm open to other bike suggestions. I've read through all the old threads and I wanted to try a Bianchi Axis, but I haven't found one in my size.

    The Kona was a fun ride. FWIW, both my road bike and my MTB are very lightweight. So, I tend towards liking light bikes.

    Thanks.

    Alex

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,645
    you're the one that has to answer the question. Is it too heavy for you?
    Or could it be part of your weight training program, to have a goal where you can finally lift that thing above your head?

    My expensive custom road bike weighs at least that much with all the junk i put on it. How does it feel going down the road? does it fit you?

    do you like it?

    can you do what you need to do with it?
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    SF bay area
    Posts
    151
    Did the test bikes have cross tires on? If not, keep in mind that those suckers are heavy!

    If you like the kona, try getting the bike shop to upgrade the wheels to something lighter (you will have to pay the price difference). Probably the easiest way to lighten up a bike. Also, look for a build with lighter components, if there is a selection.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Flagstaff AZ
    Posts
    2,521
    I'm kind of a light weight when it comes to upper body strength too and I have a redline cross bike (I don't know how much it weighs, but it is not light).

    Yeah, it can be kind of hard to get on my shoulder sometimes; but not so much because of the weight, but because of a hand issue I have. Most of the time when it is just short dismounts, i.e. a barrier or a triple barrier, I find that I just lift the bike high enough get over the barriers and it isn't too hard. And, if you are putting the bike on your shoulder say for a longer hill carry, i.e. one that a barrier in the middle that you cannot ride up, then you just have to get it to your shoulder. Once it is there, your shoulder takes the brunt. Some people put padding on their bikes since it does kind of hurt somewhat to have a bike banging around on your shoulder even though you are supporting it still with your hand.

    It is really your call and you have to know what you can handle, or maybe work up to. Try picking the bike up in the parking lot and running a bit and see how it works for you.

    spoke

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    378

    Update

    Thanks for the responses! I rode a couple more bikes. A couple of Scotts and a Pinarello. They were all lighter, some more than others, but when I rode the Kona JTS again, it all became clear to me.

    The Kona fits me best, it comes with 105 components, and I actually like the handlebars and the saddle. (I didn't like the bars or saddles on the other bikes.) For me, it accelerated better than the others and was more maneuverable. It also felt a lot better on pavement.

    I picked it up and carried it a couple of different ways and, much to the amusement of passersby, I ran around with it at the park. It really was the best bike for me and the price was right.

    I liked Mimi's idea of it giving me incentive to stick with the weight training over the winter! It's not like I can't lift it now, but I was just concerned that it was crazy heavy for a cross bike.

    Alex

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    SF bay area
    Posts
    151
    enjoy the kona! I have the 2006 JTS. love it for cross.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    14

    Risk is to your back I think

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex View Post
    .... Bear in mind that I can't even do one real pushup. One of the things I'm working on now is upper body strength, and let's just say there's a lot of room for improvement.

    ..... So, I tend towards liking light bikes.

    Thanks.

    Alex
    Here's a great overall routine from a boxing coach - but it requires decent base fitness:
    • get a cheap timer from Everlast preset for 2 min or 3 min rounds. If you're not so fit, 1 minute rounds to start:

      start w/ squats: just squat down thights parallel to ground and stand up.

      walk squat: take one step forward put knee down almost to ground and stand up, then other leg.

      hips: on all fours one leg kicks back, knee pointed out to side and don't drop the knee. Switch legs.

      stomach: (1) crunches, alternate knee to elbow; (2) plank; (3) for laterals, standup and just reach arms over to one side at a time - none stop.

      shoulders: (1) keep upper arms parallel to ground, (2) palms facing head, jab without lowering arms - keep those upper arms parallel; (3) place arms straight out to the side and keep them up and parallel to the ground for the entire round; (2) get medicine ball, lift over head from shoulder level over and over again; (3) put medicine ball on ground and do pushups on it, off it and use it to change levels of pushups.

      Keep the music on and make your friends join you. Ultimate goal is to do each described drill at one workout 3 min each.


    Key to this is to not stop during each round. It seems to me that if you can't do one pushup, you may be weak not just in the shoulder but also in the back and abs though the legs/hips might be fine. So the risk of the bike weight is that it might torque your back.

    Test your back strength: lie down and lift your feet off the ground six inches, then put them down, don't put your hands under your hips, you are really trying to work your lower back, see if you become fatiqued after only a few lifts - that's how you know.

    Push up tips: do them at length and on knees is no shame, but do them.
    Last edited by bnylo; 09-21-2008 at 01:19 PM.

 

 

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