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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033

    Fallout from the bike fit

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    Tourist position or not, I want my old fit back.

    well not quite but - I'm not happy - I rode a mere 1 round (60K) of the lake tonite, not the 3 I did with only minor discomfort a week before the fit.

    The main reason I went to get fit is because of some knee and hip pain. I do think that part is better but here's the downside.

    Lowered handlebars - neck pain. I'm sitting here neck wrapped in a scarf and hot cream on it to make it better (ok - it was cold tonight and I also might have got too much draft).
    Hands not even numb - yet - but actually the nerves in my palms got acutely pinched with some moves I did on the bars.

    Saddle moved about 1.5 inches forward - even the SMP is not really comfy anymore.

    Plus it now rides squirelly especially in aero.
    Of course the guy intended to give me a raceable fit but I think I have to revert.
    Last edited by alpinerabbit; 09-16-2008 at 12:51 PM.
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    866
    Considering getting a bike fit done after having some bad knee/IT band pain. I'm guessing each shop varies in how they do it?
    Girl meets bike. Bike leads girl to a life of grime: http://mudandmanoloscycling.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033
    Well I think he got that part right, the rest is just too advanced for me?
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    268
    It all depends on who does the fit.

    A bike fitter can do a terrific job for average joe. It can be very technical, and by the book, and result in a great fit.

    But if you are dealing with any kind of pain, recovery, etc... I would Strongly recommend going to a trained bike fitter that is also trained in physical therapy - I know we've got quite a few in Portland.

    I had a bike fit. Felt good - then a cleat got loose, long ride, and persistent knee pain even tho we re-fit and replaced the cleats. After months of "recovery" I went to a PT for a fit and physical, and with a simple saddle adjustment we removed that pain completely - from that day forward.

    A quality fit of the right kind will make all the difference.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    San Antonio Heights, CA (Upland)
    Posts
    1,067
    Some pain and discomfort is to "potentially" be expected after a bike fit. Your body has to adjust to the new fit, and it sounds like you had a pretty major adjustment from touring to racing. I'm not saying there isn't something wrong with your fit, because it sounds like you may be having more pain than you should, but it's possible that it's just a matter of getting used to it. Also, I was told at my recent bike fit to be careful how much pressure I put down on the handlebars. The more pressure on the handlebars, the more potential neck pain. Your abs and ... um ... hoo ha are supposed to hold your weight, not your hands on the handlebars. This also helps with numbness in your hands, plus you need to move your hands around on the handlebars in different positions to keep the blood flowing, etc. The squirrely handlebars is also probably from the new extra pressure you're putting onto them from your new position. Something to get used to.

    I remember the first time I rode my husband's road bike (with race fit) around the neighborhood after being used to my touring bike ... it was the strangest feeling ever! I wasn't sure I'd ever get used to it. The way I did get used to it was by letting Dh get us a road tandem and riding that for several months. And then once I got my own road bike, it felt very natural ... except the handlebars MOVED!!! I was very squirrely at first because I was used to the tandem bars being dead still, plus my bike was lighter than any I'd ever ridden.

    Anyways, I would recommend giving it a little time before going back to touring position. You might want to look into researching for another good bike fitter and seeing what they say. A second opinion. I'm still getting used to my new bike fit and it wasn't nearly as major of a difference as yours. I hear it can take months for your body to adjust. Your neck muscles aren't used to it, nor the rest of your body.

    Just some things to think about.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033
    Hmm. A PT turned bike fitter is just not available in this country, I've looked.

    I was expecting the neck issue but the hands are a no-go. I've been there and am not going back. So up they go (the bars that is).
    Plus I don't accept the reduced stability.
    Last edited by alpinerabbit; 09-17-2008 at 04:49 AM.
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619
    after just paying someone big bucks for a fit, if i felt worse i would stomp back there IMMEDIATELY and complain!
    Is there no satisfaction guarantee? Maybe he made a mistake??!
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Folsom CA
    Posts
    5,667
    Ow. That sux!

    Sometimes I wonder if I should go get a bike fit, if maybe I'm missing out on some great performance benefit without it. But I'm so comfortable on my bike right now that I'm afraid I'd be less so after the fit. I suppose in my case, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

    2009 Lynskey R230 Houseblend - Brooks Team Pro
    2007 Rivendell Bleriot - Rivet Pearl

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    943
    Mimi has a good point! I would go back and tell the fitter what is going on and see if they can help you. When I got my new Madone fitted I had pain in my right knee on the test ride. He put the saddle a tad higher and it was immediately gone.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    271
    Maybe you should adjust your 'fit' gradually. They told me it would take a few rides to get my body used to my proper fit. Moving your seat 1.5" is a lot. Maybe a more gradual adjustment would be easier on your body? Just wondering if that is an option! Good luck, those aches and pains are rotten to deal with.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    186
    I'd definitely go back for adjustments. Just talk to the fitter & say "The knees & hips are better, but now I'm having trouble with my hands & neck." When I had my bike fit, I was told that a post-fit tweaking was often part of the process.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Md suburbs of Wash. DC
    Posts
    2,131
    Why is it necessary to be fit into a race/aero position? Are you racing or planning to? I had neck/shoulder issues and numb hands, and raising my bars to the type of touring position that you had been using made all of that go away. If you're not racing, then why not go back to a touring position?

    One of the guys who writes for the RoadBikeRider.com newsletters (whose name I of course can't remember at the moment) has also commented on this multiple times, stating that he thinks a lower bar position is detrimental for most riders out there. His view is that lower bar might = more speed, but higher bar = greater comfort = more riding.
    "How about if we all just try to follow these very simple rules of the road? Drive like the person ahead on the bike is your son/daughter. Ride like the cars are ambulances carrying your loved ones to the emergency room. This should cover everything, unless you are a complete sociopath."
    David Desautels, in a letter to velonews.com

    Random babblings and some stuff to look at.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,403
    Quote Originally Posted by Kalidurga View Post
    Why is it necessary to be fit into a race/aero position? Are you racing or planning to? I had neck/shoulder issues and numb hands, and raising my bars to the type of touring position that you had been using made all of that go away. If you're not racing, then why not go back to a touring position?

    One of the guys who writes for the RoadBikeRider.com newsletters (whose name I of course can't remember at the moment) has also commented on this multiple times, stating that he thinks a lower bar position is detrimental for most riders out there. His view is that lower bar might = more speed, but higher bar = greater comfort = more riding.
    It seems to me that racing position has become sort of the 'default' riding position that many LBS people put riders in these days. People seem to want to look like racers even if they never do any racing at all.
    Of course everyone has a right to be in whatever position they choose on their bikes, but I think sometimes the beginner riders have no idea why they are not comfortable in the now almost 'standard' racing posture.

    And JoBob- I agree- if it ain't broke, don't fix it!
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033
    yeah I "race" - tris. I'll do the reversion on the bars myself as I don't need to take the trip there but I'll definitely let him know what worked for me and what did not.

    Best learning experience is now I know why most triathletes out there just veer left and right on the road - it's the bars. When I got them, I thought "this is easier than it looked". but having them real high up was the difference.
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    portland, or
    Posts
    100
    I also got a bike fit from a LBS in Portland, and have been completely dissatisfied with it. I went in complaining of numbness and pain in my crotch, and felt like I needed to adjust my seat for more power. Okay, so he actually moves my seat down, it felt okay in the shop on the trainer for a few minutes, but when I went out to road test it, I couldn't go any longer than a couple miles from the knee pain.

    So, I bumped it up myself so I could finish the ride, then went back. He readjusted my seat and then declared I needed more narrow handlebars. Hmm, okay. He's the professional, who am I to argue? I got the handlebars installed, he did another quick little adjustment, and sent me out. Two months later, I still have pain in my neck and shoulders and also in my groin. He didn't make anything better, only adding the new neck pain to the mix.

    I went in today actually, and asked to exchange handlebars to a bigger size, which they did with no problems at all. But now I'm back to square one, trying to find the right handlebar angle, hood position, seat position, and cleat position. I have no confidence that this fitter knows what he's doing. I essentially threw away $75 for the fitting itself, and another $60 (plus install) on the handlebars, which are the same size as I had prior, they got rid of my old bars after they swapped them.

    SO angry.

 

 

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