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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    905

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea View Post
    My addition:
    Don't be afraid to try saddles that aren't labeled as women's saddles. Look at size, cutout/no cutout, and shape.
    +1
    In 30 years I have never been able to ride comfortably on any saddle that was labelled as women-specific... I've always found some men saddles that were perfectly comfortable, but never a women one.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    1,061

    Bontrager torture

    I've learned from TE that my Bontrager saddle needed to come off my new trek right away! I rode it once (got a little chafed), then tried my husband's B17. I determined I wanted the B68 and ordered it. While I waited, I put the stock Bontrager back on. MORE DISCOMFORT. When I got home, I looked at it closer--there is a bump in the most comfortable spot--a woman's most sensitive spot--CHECK IT OUT. I'm now convinced it's a medieval torture device.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    "Well-behaved women seldom make history." --Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    '09 Trek WSD 2.1 with a Brooks B-68 saddle
    '11 Trek WSD Madone 5.2 with Brooks B-17

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    646
    Quote Originally Posted by TxDoc View Post
    +1
    In 30 years I have never been able to ride comfortably on any saddle that was labelled as women-specific... I've always found some men saddles that were perfectly comfortable, but never a women one.
    Do you have a narrow sit bone width (just curious)? When I went into my less-than-beloved LBS, they measured me for a 130 mm Specialized saddle (the narrowest width for women. I sat on that silly oozy contraption. Does that mean they are figuring for the 1-2cm on each side of your sit bones?

    What men's saddles have worked best for you?
    Ana
    * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
    2009 Lynskey R230
    Trek Mountain Track 850

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    905
    Quote Originally Posted by Ana View Post
    Do you have a narrow sit bone width (just curious)?
    Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by Ana View Post
    What men's saddles have worked best for you?
    Let's see, my all-time favorites are:
    1-SSM Era arrowhead (124mm), LOVE LOVE LOVE that one!!! the Era is my 'travel seat', I take it with me to use with rental/borrowed bikes when I have to travel - just to make sure that my ride is going to be comfortable!
    2-SI SLR gel flow (130mm), love that one too!!!
    3-I just got a SSM aspide carbon superleggera a few days ago (there's a thread here in the favorite saddles with my comments about it), 130mm too, and it's really fantastic (and 120 grams!!!).
    Another saddle I liked (I got to borrow it for a couple of months from a friend) is the AX lightness phoenix (125mm). The weight is like 60 grams or less, great saddle, but it was like $600 so totally out of my saddle budget!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    905
    Ooooops! I forgot one of the questions...
    Quote Originally Posted by Ana View Post
    I sat on that silly oozy contraption. Does that mean they are figuring for the 1-2cm on each side of your sit bones?
    In theory when they measure you they should give you one value and one range:
    1-your sitbone width.
    2-the range of saddle width that you may find comfortable given your sitbone width (a little wider, yes).

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,414
    My sb's measure about 125mm. Love my 132mm Ariones. Found Fizik's "women's performance" saddle, the Vitesse HP, a bit wide, and likewise found BF's old 143mm Specialized Alias too wide in back.

    My anatomy does not get on well with cutouts at all. I'm much more comfortable without one...

    BF is currently riding a Selle Italia Flite Gelflow (about 130mm). It's ok, I think I'd do better on the SLR if I were going to choose a Selle Italia saddle.
    Last edited by VeloVT; 09-10-2008 at 04:43 AM.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,576

    Leveling a Brooks (or similar leather saddle)

    Start with a Brooks by leveling the NOSE, not the entire saddle.

    The cantle (the bit at the back) will rise slightly higher than the forepart of the saddle.

    Don't forget there is a cantle plate under the rear of the saddle. When you sit on the leather, it hammocks under your butt. You end up sinking a bit lower at the slightly higher rear of the saddle, essentially bringing the hammocking bit down to about the same approximate height as the nose, BUT ONLY WHILE YOU ARE ON IT.

    If you level the saddle from tip-to-tail instead of at the nose only, you may end up with some pain in front.
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,576

    Squeaking and creaking Brooks

    First check all the obvious suspects: loose clamp, squeaking springs (if you've got 'em), creaking frame joints under the cantle.

    Then check the not-so-obvious nose end. All that hardware at the tensioning bolt can creak. And the real odd bit to check is the half-ball and socket joint (yes, there is one) at the very front of the saddle. The easiest way I've found to oil that joint is to squirt oil on it from the back half. That is the cause of probably 99.999% of the creaking of my B67.

    Nose creaks can propagate through the frame and sound like they are absolutely positively no-doubt-about-it coming from the back of the frame. Don't forget to check the nose!
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    8

    Sitbones

    I may need to run to my LBS to get that gel. I have a Terry Butterfly that starts to get uncomfortable after 1 1/2 hours of riding. I assume it will be around 7". I wear a size 12 when I'm in good shape. Right now, I wear a size 14. So I have those good birthing hips. KnottedYet, I'm checking into the Brooks saddles that you list. Those are wider and may work for me.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,576
    Pants size and hip width have very little to do with pelvic outlet diameter, it's seems weird but it's true.

    There is a thread somewhere with a gajillion different ways to measure your own bones, you don't need to go to an LBS and sit on their butt-o-meter. You can do it yourself with just a tape measure.

    Terry saddles are generally on the wide side. Your saddle may be wide enough, but the shape or the padding may be causing you problems.

    Before you buy any saddle it's a good idea to get your measurements (try a few ways of measuring) and puzzle out what about your current saddle is causing you the trouble.

    Start a thread with your measurements, your current saddle, and the problems you are having; and I *guarantee* you will have several folks chirp up with suggestions to help!
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    8
    Thanks, I'll do that. In looking at saddles, the wider ones always seemed so soft. I tried one of those and after a half hour (can't remember the brand, I sold it), the softness was getting to me. So I figured all the wide saddles were meant for people who wanted soft, gushy rides. I like a saddle that is a bit firmer. So I figured the medium-wide saddles were best. The Terry feels better than the squishy one. But after a 1 1/2 hours it is not comfortable.

    The Brooks saddles interest me. The B-67 is a wider saddle, but a firm one. I'll get those sitbones measured. I'll send the kids outside so they don't think mom is whacked out.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,409
    Just because a saddle is wide doesn't mean it has to be soft and foamy/gel/cushy. Brooks B68=perfect example of a WIDE saddle that is VERY firm with NO padding.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    Quote Originally Posted by KnottedYet View Post
    Start with a Brooks by leveling the NOSE, not the entire saddle.

    The cantle (the bit at the back) will rise slightly higher than the forepart of the saddle.

    Don't forget there is a cantle plate under the rear of the saddle. When you sit on the leather, it hammocks under your butt. You end up sinking a bit lower at the slightly higher rear of the saddle, essentially bringing the hammocking bit down to about the same approximate height as the nose, BUT ONLY WHILE YOU ARE ON IT.

    If you level the saddle from tip-to-tail instead of at the nose only, you may end up with some pain in front.
    Maybe you could post a photo or two of a properly leveled Brooks saddle?

    I'd like to see your Brooks collection anyway
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    I've figured out that one:

    I need a cutout.

    And two:

    I need a flat saddle.

    A lot of women's saddles have curved surfaces. For example, the Specialized Ruby is more curved than the Specialized Toupe. I use the Toupe. The curves cause uneven weight distribution for me, so I have a smaller contact area on the curved surface.

    If a person is having problems with saddles and can't seem to find the right width, right cutout size, correct amount of padding, I suggest looking at the surface shape in relation to your anatomy. (Your seat
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    Posting just to bring this up to the first page for people who need the info. Good thread.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

 

 

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