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  1. #16
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    Sep 2007
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    orygun
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    actually I think my stem is 80mm long...it's a Ritchey adjustable.

    let's see...I think riding the top was the worst...the hoods--with relaxed hands and my weight more on the heel of my hand--- the best, and the primary pain is at the base of my thumbs...which may also be partially due to the mac laptop...but it is noticably worse when riding. knock wood...i have no other pain issues with the bike.

    i can find the photo of my pony for ya
    Discipline is remembering what you want.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    orygun
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    1,145
    here she is....my little Morgan horse.... before I swapped the bars, angled the stem up a few degrees and got brake shims:
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    Discipline is remembering what you want.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    894
    Where is your saddle compared to your handlebar? And how is your weight distributed, do you feel like most of the weight ends up on your forearms/wrists/hands?
    Never mind, ignore the question - I see the photo now...
    Last edited by TxDoc; 08-14-2008 at 04:45 PM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    894
    Did the shop fit you at that saddle height and top tube length? In other words, are both the correct setup for your leg/torso/arms measurements?

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    894
    Well, here's what I'm thinking... and why I ask all of these questions... ;D
    My first impression is that you should be moving the opposite way and try to bring your bars down instead of up...
    Here's a disclaimer... I am NOT an expert or anything, and I haven't seen you on the bike, so take it with some caution... end of disclaimer
    So anyway, the first impression is that your stem is way too high on top of the steerer tube. The first thing I would try is to move some of the spacers on TOP of the stem.
    So in practice, take out the headset, take out the stem, and take two of the spacers out (I can see three in the photo). Then put the stem back, and put the other two spacers on top of the stem, and then put back the headset.
    That way you would have the saddle a little higher than the stem, and you can lower your back a little more. What that would do is bring your shoulder closer to the handlebar. That allows your elbows to bend, and relax. With your elbows and arms relaxed, the weight would be more distributed on your seat and pedals, and less on your hands. Less weight on the hands/wrists - less chance for tension and for a posture that would cause pain.
    Some other benefits could come from this: for example the ability to ride in the drops as well, without strain and therefore without pain. Also, your back would be a little flatter, and that makes you more aerodynamic, so you can cycle with less effort.
    What do you think? And, most important, do you have a picture of you on your bike, showing your riding position?

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    894
    Sorry, I'm posting in bites and pieces tonight...
    Another doubt I have is the handlebars - maybe something with a deeper drop would help? Sometimes we try to solve reach problems by buying short/shallow handlebars - while truly we should try to work on the fit first, and then think of swapping equipment.
    Do you have different bars now?

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    orygun
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    interesting...i was operating under the impression that the saddle should be level with the bars or a little bit lower for more comfort....your eye sees the opposite problem!

    I do have different bars on now...it was a small hands issue...and the ergo bend on the ritcheys (in te photo above) made it near impossible to reach the brakes in the drops. So I got something close in size but not ergo....ergo () the Cinelli Little Wing that's on there now. http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...1&category=636

    I'm not sure it was the best choice, only because the bar seems cramped and narrow in comparison...which could also be due to the clumsy placement of gel pads on them...but I do miss the little sweep back on the Ritcheys.
    I also neglected to note the placement of the brifters when I changed...so I wonder if some of the increase in hand pain is due to that. And my plan is to take the pads out from under the tape.

    When I went looking for a steel road bike I was helped by a guy in one of the LBS who is a fitter...and he basically told me I needed a frame under 48" with a TT less than 52. This made me realize I had passed over several bikes I thought were too small (???the 50 had felt too big and I assumed the next size down would be too small...why? IDK) Went back to another store and tried the 47cm Aurora and it felt perfect. I bought it at a co-op without too much fitting advice at all.

    I did feel confident in what the fiter had told me, and had studied the numbers enough to feel secure buying this bike. Friends with a great deal of experience have told me its a good fit....HOWEVER.....no one has studied me on the bike and given me enough info to make informed choices about components....

    wow...i have a lot to say on this subject!!!

    i have a photo from the winter of me on the original set up. I'll eat supper and then go get them!:
    Discipline is remembering what you want.

  8. #23
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    Sep 2007
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    orygun
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    1,145
    here are the photos, Doc
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    Discipline is remembering what you want.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    894
    The cinelli you have is actually a nice compromise - where are your brake/shifters positioned now on the new bar?

  10. #25
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    Sep 2007
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    orygun
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    freshly shot...with the new angle on the stem, and my new tape.
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    Discipline is remembering what you want.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by elk View Post
    here are the photos, Doc
    See, that is sort of what I feared...
    From the pictures, again my impression is that the handlebar is way too high. And of course your body tries to compensate by sitting as upright as it can - while still trying to reach the bars. You end up in this hybrid positioning with a pretty steep angle on the seat, and your arms stretched out to reach the handlebars. So you are sitting upright on the bike with the arms basically extended. That means that whatever weight (or tension) is distributed to the upper torso does not get absorbed by the 'natural springs' (elbows), but falls directly on the wrist and hand. That is pretty much a recipe for wrist pain right there.
    And this is without considering that maybe you would need fitting of the position of the brifters, and stem length, etc...

    I would start with making sure that the saddle is in the right position for you. I can't decide if it's really in the right place from the photo because of the long pants (I can't tell if your leg has a little bit of an angle on the lowest endpoint, or if it's stretched out...)
    If you have a stationary trainer and a friend/husband/relative with a little patience you can get them to help in the setup process. Check saddle height first, and get a helper with a plumb line (a thread with a washer or screw at the end as weight would work too) to check the fore/aft position. Once you are sure that your seat is in the right place, You can work on the bars. Just bring the stem back to 0 degrees (it's adjustable so it should be easy), and swap a couple of spacers on top of it to lower the handlebar.
    At this point, with the bars lowered, you should be able to come down more and flatten your back - and so your elbows would be bent and your wrist/hands relaxed. From this position, if the stem length is correct for you (80mm may turn out to be a tad short once you come down) and if the brifters are placed correctly, you will be able to comfortably reach your brake levers/shifters from both the hoods and the drops. It should not cause pain because any workload should be absorbed by the elbows. And really your arms should not bear much of the weight at all.
    Once you are in the correct positioning, theis is where you can check the placement of the brifters on the handlebar, the angle of the handlebar, and the stem length (and angle, in case you need to change it) for optimal reach and minimum effort/tension. If still the bars do not feel right, then maybe you need different drop/reach combination, i.e. a new bar. But really that Cinelli is a medium compromise, so I really doubt that it could be the source of the problem.

    Not sure if this whole thing makes any sense - it's always easier to do it than to describe it But seriously, from the photos the strain on the wrist seem to be coming from being too upright. In general, the upright position may be comfortable on a cruiser (big wing bars, moustache, albatross, etc) - but it cannot really be comfortable on a road bike because it's actually kind of going against the geometry of the road bike with drop bars...
    Hope this helps!

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    510
    Easton EC90 Equipe Pro. Got mine from Sierra Trading Post, but they're going fast (if you take a 42 or 44 c-c). They require a stem with 2 bolts, though.

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/,...bar-26-mm.html

    These Ritchey WCS bars are alu and don't require a 2-bolt stem, but not quite as short a reach & drop as the Eastons.
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...3&category=636

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by elk View Post
    freshly shot...with the new angle on the stem, and my new tape.
    Niiice colors! matching tape and saddle, wow!
    So yes, I confirm my pevious post, the main suggestions are to 1-bring the stem back to 0, 2-swap two of the three spacers on top of the stem, 3-redo the fitting (saddle height, fore/aft, stem adjustments) on the trainer with someone that can look at you and help, 4-try and test ride to se how you feel.
    It does take a while to find your optimal fit, and you need either a pro fitting service or some experimentation (trial and error, really) - so you are on the good track

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    orygun
    Posts
    1,145
    thank you for your eyes and your suggestions, ...I will give them a try...

    I LOVE that Easton bar...but a 42 is just too big...if it was 40 I would've bought a month ago!!

    The Ritchey is quite like what I have without the ergo bend...now that I have the shims, I could probably use them again...

    but I do love looking at bars
    Discipline is remembering what you want.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    orygun
    Posts
    1,145
    i moved the bar down one spacer (i'd rather go slowly...if i need to move it 2 i will) and will work on the saddle H and F/A when I get mr elk's eyes later....

    I don't know yet how it will FEEL...but I must say she looks rather sleeker...

    HIS new bike...the volpe should be ready soon...can't wait!! (the LBS is raising his bars to level with his saddle)

    wish it wasn't QUITE so hot...want to check it all out!!! on a longish ride...
    Discipline is remembering what you want.

 

 

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