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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006

    11 best foods - from the nytimes

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    1. Beets: Think of beets as red spinach, Dr. Bowden said, because they are a rich source of folate as well as natural red pigments that may be cancer fighters.
    How to eat: Fresh, raw and grated to make a salad. Heating decreases the antioxidant power.
    2. Cabbage: Loaded with nutrients like sulforaphane, a chemical said to boost cancer-fighting enzymes.
    How to eat: Asian-style slaw or as a crunchy topping on burgers and sandwiches.
    3. Swiss chard: A leafy green vegetable packed with carotenoids that protect aging eyes.
    How to eat it: Chop and saute in olive oil.
    4. Cinnamon: Helps control blood sugar and cholesterol.
    How to eat it: Sprinkle on coffee or oatmeal.
    5. Pomegranate juice: Lowers blood pressure and loaded with vitamin C and other antioxidants.
    How to eat: Just drink it.
    6. Dried plums: Okay, so they are really prunes, but packed with cancer-fighting antioxidants.
    How to eat: Wrapped in prosciutto and baked.
    7. Pumpkin seeds: The most nutritious part of the pumpkin and packed with magnesium; high levels of the mineral are associated with lower risk for early death.
    How to eat: Roasted as a snack, or sprinkled on salad.
    8. Sardines: Dr. Bowden calls them "health food in a can.'' They are high in omega-3's, contain virtually no mercury and are loaded with calcium. They also contain iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper and manganese as well as a full complement of B vitamins.
    How to eat: Choose sardines packed in olive or sardine oil. Eat plain, mixed with salad, on toast, or mashed with dijon mustard and onions as a spread.
    9. Turmeric: The "superstar of spices,'' it has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties.
    How to eat: Mix with scrambled eggs or in any vegetable dish.
    10. Frozen blueberries: Even though freezing can degrade some of the nutrients in fruits and vegetables, frozen blueberries are available year-round and don't spoil; associated with better memory in animal studies.
    How to eat: Blended with yogurt or chocolate soy milk and sprinkled with crushed almonds.
    11. Canned pumpkin: A low-calorie vegetable that is high in fiber and immune-stimulating vitamin A; fills you up on very few calories.
    How to eat: Mix with a little butter, cinnamon and nutmeg.
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Skagit County, Washington
    Mimmi: Thanks for posting that! In reading it, I had an "Uh Oh" moment! I routinely put frozen blueberries on my cereal. But the rest -- hmmm. I have some serious work to do -- I thought I did well!? Who knew!
    Everyone Deserves a Lifetime



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