Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 4 of 40 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 587
  1. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Columbia River Gorge
    Posts
    3,583

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Thanks Bron. That's a great suggestion. I'm a bit challenged here when it comes to finding someplace to practice technique that is flat and has been groomed, or at least packed snow. I've got to figure that out. It's pretty hard to skate in 18" of powder. I really should be out snowboarding.

    Surgtech - That's a big ski for the first time back in a while and after an injury like yours. Well done.
    Living life like there's no tomorrow.

    http://gorgebikefitter.com/


    2007 Look Dura Ace
    2010 Custom Tonic cross with discs, SRAM
    2012 Moots YBB 2 x 10 Shimano XTR
    2014 Soma B-Side SS

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    436
    Ok - I've searched the inernet and I can't find a decent explanation of this anywhere - how do you stop/slow down when you are going downhill

    And by downhill I mean any slight incline. My present technique is to gather speed until I panic and throw myself to the ground in deperation.

    I have tried pressing my skies into the sides of the tracks with little effect apart from knackering my knees and ankles. The snowplow I find less effective with the narrower skis. And the fact that you can only lift one foot out of the tracks.

    Any advice welcome.

    Yours,

    A Complete Beginner.
    If it's not one thing it's another

  3. #48
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Perpetual Confusion and Indecision
    Posts
    488
    Snowplowing really is the way to slow yourself down (if you feel unable to jump out of the tracks, you can try leaving one ski in the track, while snowplowing with the other). When you snowplow, try to keep your weight back a bit, and push down and out with your heels. Actually, on a really steep hill, if you want to slow down, you can sort of lean backward while snowplowing, to really try to dig in. Once you get the hang of it, you can try hockey stops (I don't recommend that quite yet, though ). Once you get some time in on your skis, you'll find you feel more comfortable. If you find that you feel unsteady on downhills, try to remember to keep your center of gravity low, and lead with your hands (tucking downhills does make you go faster, but it also keeps you steady, and you are less likely to fall). By all means, if you feel like you are going too fast, step out of the tracks, which will allow you to maneuver your skis better. It might help to find a nice little hill where you can practice snowplowing at really slow speeds until you get the feel for it.

    Practice, practice, practice, and you'll learn to love the speed!

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    269
    Bruno- Snowplowing is the best way to slow down/ stop. You probably also want to get out of the tracks. If you're not going too fast, take one foot out and use it to snowplow. If you're going pretty fast, you may feel more comfortable getting out of the tracks altogether.

    Wahine- Do you know the difference between V1 and V2? If not, learning to V1 may be your ticket to getting uphill (it's a lot easier). I also second the suggestion to spend time skiing without poles (it really helps sort out body position/ balance issues).

    Skiierchickie- At the last clinic I went to- they were actually teaching a wider based stance. It sounded like this is new in the last year or two. They specifically advised against overlapping the ski tails. I'm still muddling through some of the other things they pointed out and haven't paid much attention to this yet. It seems like skating technique has changed every time I go to a clinic.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Jackson Hole, Wyo.
    Posts
    189
    Don't worry, trees are great for slowing you down! (Good snowplow advice)

    I skate, too, when I'm in shape for it, but my favorite kind of skiing is the long, rolly, out-in-the-middle-of-nowhere tour that makes me feel like I'm in Narnia. My X-C setup has metal edges (Karhu Catamount) so it is easier to turn on the way back DOWN the hill.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMGP1145.jpg 
Views:	245 
Size:	133.7 KB 
ID:	5241  

    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose ...” -- Dr. Seuss

    Life's an adventure! http://www.lovenewsjh.blogspot.com

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Columbia River Gorge
    Posts
    3,583
    Quote Originally Posted by anakiwa View Post
    Wahine- Do you know the difference between V1 and V2? If not, learning to V1 may be your ticket to getting uphill (it's a lot easier). I also second the suggestion to spend time skiing without poles (it really helps sort out body position/ balance issues).
    No I don't know the difference between V1 and V2. But I'm gonna find out. That and I need to find a fairly flat place to practice my no pole skiing.
    Living life like there's no tomorrow.

    http://gorgebikefitter.com/


    2007 Look Dura Ace
    2010 Custom Tonic cross with discs, SRAM
    2012 Moots YBB 2 x 10 Shimano XTR
    2014 Soma B-Side SS

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    269
    You're probably doing V2 or V2 alternate, those are what's natural for most people (in V2 you pole every time you push off with a ski, in V2 alternate you pole only when pushing off with one side- in other words you're poling twice as much with V2 as with V2 alternate).

    V1 differs in the timing of pole plant and push off (foot). To V1, you put one foot (either the right or the left depending on which side you're using) down at almost exactly the same time you plant your poles. To someone who isn't familiar with things it will look similar to V2 alternate, but it's not the same thing. V1 won't feel as powerful, but it should feel easier. Generally, the only time it will feel natural is when you're going up a moderate or steep hill.

    I hope that helps- you may want to find a video- or better yet someone to actually show you.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Columbia River Gorge
    Posts
    3,583
    OK. That's means that right now I'm using a V2 alternate. I'll see if I can find a video that shows the V1 technique.

    Thanks!!
    Living life like there's no tomorrow.

    http://gorgebikefitter.com/


    2007 Look Dura Ace
    2010 Custom Tonic cross with discs, SRAM
    2012 Moots YBB 2 x 10 Shimano XTR
    2014 Soma B-Side SS

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Welsh but living in Munich, Germany
    Posts
    324
    One of my colleagues lent me this set of video clips: http://www.perfectskating.com/test/frameset.htm

    It's aimed at people who want to race, but what I have seen of it looks pretty good.
    There are probably other videos available for free on the net.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    northern california
    Posts
    1,460
    We had 3 days of snowing sideways earlier this week.. Today it was cold but clear and beautiful. So we grabbed our big, metal edged touring skis, threw the dogs in the car, and went out to a place that we frequently bike in the summer but haven't been to in the winter. It's a local recreation area with camping in the summer. The road runs between a small lake and some low mountains.

    In the winter they only plow the road for about a mile, to a small parking area. It was perfect. We were able to ski down the unplowed road in about 6 inches of powder on top of packed snow. We were the only ones out there for the whole 2+ hours we were out. It was like being in a picture postcard.

    The dogs had a wonderful time. They could run without sinking up to their chests. Now they're sacked out on the floor. A tired dog is a good dog!

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,684
    Ha! We just skied for 2 hours after a turrible long commute. We had to go allllll the long way to the end of our driveway.

    We skied through the neighborhood and up to the ridge that runs along the back of it. 15 mins of work and there wasn't a house in sight. Nice powder and no ice today.

    Just a few product notes: Karhu's XCD skis climb better than Fischer S-bounds and Salomon X-Adv. Bubba's big boat feet like Alpina 1550 boots but my dainty tootsies now have a sore ridge across the tops of my toes. If anyone hears rumor of a princess hitting every shop in Oregon trying on every BC boot made, you can say you know her.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    269

    Need Wax Advice

    Okay any waxing experts I need help. The Craftsbury Marathon (classic) is this Saturday- I'm doing the half (25K) and need help with what to use for kick wax.

    The forecast calls for the temperature to be between 25 and 30 during the race. Here's the tricky part- in the 24 hours before the race there is supposed to be: snow, sleet, freezing rain, and snow showers.

    So- do I use klister? If so one type or more than one? What about hard wax over the klister? I usually prep the skis the day before the race, but this one seems like a bit of a gamble. Oh- and I don't own a blow torch so waiting to see what actually fell and applying klister at the race would be difficult.

    Thanks.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Perpetual Confusion and Indecision
    Posts
    488
    Zoiks! I haven't used a torch on my skis in 20 years! I also haven't used a lot of klister in all that time, as I pretty much skate these days (especially in those hard to wax conditions). So I am of no help. But I'd stay away from torches (very hard on ski bases). I'm going to stay away from giving you misguided "help" on the wax issue. Sounds like perfect conditions for a pair of those new no-wax racing skis!

    Have fun!

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Welsh but living in Munich, Germany
    Posts
    324
    If I'm putting klister on, I just use the spreader that comes in the box with it and my hands (have a rag and some klister remover handy); once it's been skied in a couple of km, it's usually pretty smooth.

    1st piece of advice: is there an official wax supplier? Over here, either Swix or Toko give a wax tip the evening before a race - if there is an official tip then follow it, these guys know what they are talking about (more than some girl on the other side of the Atlantic).

    2nd: if snow is falling or there is new snow in the tracks, avoid klister (I learnt this one the hard way).

    3rd: if you are not sure what you are doing then try to keep it simple. I don't mix klister and hard wax. I am sure it is possible to do well, but I know that I will just make a mess of it.

    I hope this helps a little bit and do have fun.

    SadieKate - I'm very jealous, can you send some of the excess over here, please?

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    269
    Toko has a race website- they give the glide wax recommendations and then say to iron on some binder and find the rep in the morning for further instructions. I went to a Swix clinic last night- he was basically saying the same thing- pushing a thin layer of green klister as a binder and then wait and see what to put on top (or show up with 3-4 pairs of skis with different options). I do have a decent pair of no wax skis, but they won't work in ice all that well. I guess I'm just going to have to do the ski prep at the race.

    To make matters worse, they're now predicting up to a 1/2 inch of ice tonight (followed by snow) so the driving may be treacherous (if not impossible- the race is nearly an hour away). Do you think hard wax over klister would work on the car tires too?

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •