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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    11

    Question cyclocross as a tourer??

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    hey, well iv been wanting a tourer for a while but have been having a hard time deciding as I really wanted something fast,so i was wondering if a cyclo-cross bike would be comfortable and sturdy enough to tour. I'm into long distances,but im mainly interested in staying in hostels during tours so that i can travel lighter and therefore go faster and gain more mile coverage. I know that cyclo-cross bikes can accommodate panniers and are fast ,but i was wondering about the positioning as its more of a racing position than a tourer and i worry this could cause back problems, and also whether its gonna last me a few years and put up with serious miles.any feedback greatfuly appreciated!,cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    983

    Talking cyclocross as a tourer??

    If indeed you are not going to carry heavy loads then your bike is probably fine. The difference between a touring bike and a cyclocross bike is that the frame (touring)has a longer wheelbase,lower bottom bracket and longer chain stays, and of course the geometry of the frame is different. All of this contributes to the bike being able to handle much better and will be more stable. But, if you aren't going to carry panniers, then I would say go have fun!

    I'm with you, although I love to race, I find the my true love is really distance!


    Keep us posted as to how your bike holds up! I'm building a touring bike right now!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,556
    Quote Originally Posted by madison View Post
    hey, well iv been wanting a tourer for a while but have been having a hard time deciding as I really wanted something fast,so i was wondering if a cyclo-cross bike would be comfortable and sturdy enough to tour. I'm into long distances,but im mainly interested in staying in hostels during tours so that i can travel lighter and therefore go faster and gain more mile coverage. I know that cyclo-cross bikes can accommodate panniers and are fast ,but i was wondering about the positioning as its more of a racing position than a tourer and i worry this could cause back problems, and also whether its gonna last me a few years and put up with serious miles.any feedback greatfuly appreciated!,cheers
    I have my Surly Cross Check set up so the bike/body contacts are exactly the same distance (e.g. saddle to bars, etc). The Cross bike is more responsive - one of my local wrenches has one, and his feedback on it loaded was that it's noodley when heavily loaded. As long as you're in the 20-30 pound weight range for what you're carrying, I seriously doubt you'd have a problem. Just make sure the bike is set up the way you want it for touring, not the way someone racing would want it. FYI the cross check is my local wrench's only bike AND only transportation.
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
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    10,576
    I also have a Surly Cross Check, and have it set up for commuting/utility/touring.

    It handles the loaded panniers just fine, and it really ISN'T an agressively positioned bike. I'll be making it even more comfy for me when I put a taller stem on it next week. (messed up neck from a car accident, so even though having the bars even with the saddle like they are now is pretty darn comfy for most folks, I prefer to have the bars even higher)



    edit: there is a Surly Long Haul Trucker (tourer) and Cross Check (cyclocross) owners page. I think the site is www.surlyville.net They have some great bike ideas, and lots of nice bike pics!
    Last edited by KnottedYet; 07-11-2007 at 09:03 PM.
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    983

    Talking cyclocross as a tourer

    Just wanted to leave a message to Knotted... great picture of your bike! Now I'm more mtoivated to finish my touring bike!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,409
    Quote Originally Posted by ridebikeme View Post
    If indeed you are not going to carry heavy loads then your bike is probably fine. The difference between a touring bike and a cyclocross bike is that the frame (touring)has a longer wheelbase,lower bottom bracket and longer chain stays, and of course the geometry of the frame is different. All of this contributes to the bike being able to handle much better and will be more stable. But, if you aren't going to carry panniers, then I would say go have fun!
    Don't forget the all important fact that touring bikes usually have your body in less of a hunched down racing position so you'll be more able to ride long distances.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridebikeme View Post
    Just wanted to leave a message to Knotted... great picture of your bike! Now I'm more mtoivated to finish my touring bike!
    Thanks! Yeah, she's kinda purty.... I'm embarrassed to admit I sit on the floor next to my bikes and admire them.

    I had thought about a LHT, so I could do some fully loaded touring eventually. But... I rode the Cross Check and fell in love. Couldn't wait for the LBS to build up a LHT that I might try (they usually have one or two built up and ready to ride). Had to have the Cross Check RIGHT THEN! (well, no, I went back and rode it again for about 14 miles a week later and THEN I bought it.)

    Realistically, I'll probably never really do full touring, and the rear panniers I can put on the C C will be enough.
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    11

    thanks

    hey thanks for all your replies, much appreciated-I'm still struggling to decide, does anybody know how much it would cost extra to get an extend able stem put on a cyclo cross ? Iv got my eye on two cyclocross bikes;KONA JAKE THE SNAKE(or sutra) and SPECIALIZED TRICROSS 2008, all are on evanscycles.com but I cant really tell the difference in the spec-does anyone have any tips on what to look out for? I cant seem to work out the gears and I feel this is very important,cheers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    11

    hey thanks for all your replies

    I posted a reply ages and ages ago so I don't know why it never showed up-I'm new to all this so maybe I didn't press the right button!,but yeah thanks for all your replies-greatly appreciated, I plan on traveling fairly light as Ill be hosteling but I was wondering as I'm leaning towards getting a cyclocross-would it be difficult or expensive to get an extend able stem to remedy the back problem issue? and thanks knottedyet for the surly site-some great pics on there,how much weight can you carry on yours?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,576
    I've got a taller stem on order for my Surly. Bad neck, so even though the bars are already up at saddle-level I still want them higher.

    I'm getting a Dimension (threadless) that should raise me up another couple inches for $27.

    My other bike has a quill stem and I ordered a taller one by Nitto for $40. Quills are nice, cuz you can adjust them all over the place. One of the benefits of having an older bike...

    As far as weight on my Surly, I'd guess I've carried about 20 pounds at the most so far. Next time I buy a bag of dogfood I'll pay more attention to how it goes.
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,559
    If you are planning to travel light, hosteling or credit card touring, then you don't need as long of a wheelbase for stability, so a cyclocross bike becomes more reasonable. Another option to keep in mind is a trailer for heavy loads, which again mean your bike geometry can be more flexible.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Aberystwyth, Wales
    Posts
    659
    I've raised the handlebars on my Specialized cyclocross bike. Not sure how to describe it, but basically added an extender thingy which raised it several inches. Works well for me. And I've done some serious miles on that bike, though not with panniers or any heavy loads.

 

 

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