Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    9

    2006 Cannondale R800

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Hi, all! I've been lurking for a bit, learning from everyone, and now I have a question so it's time to delurk! I'll post in the Getting to Know you Thread later today. I'm a complete newbie when it comes to riding, but I know myself pretty well and think it's going to be a perfect fit for my lifestyle - kind of a "why haven't I been doing this for years" sort of thing.

    I'm buying a road bike for mixed use - triathlons, group rides, in-town commuting, and just plain fun. I live in a small town in northern MN, so I have a small LBS I'm looking at and a few others within 3 hours drive time. I'd really like to buy from the LBS if I can, both to keep money here and because they offer great service and seem to be a good shop from the scuttlebutt I've heard.

    So I've been on a few bikes - A 2007 Specialized Ruby Comp in a 51 (at a shop in a different town), a 2006 Trek 2100 in a 52, and a 2006 Cannondale R800 in a 50. I should also mention that this is just on a trainer - we've got just enough snow to make outside riding impossible. However I'd like to buy soon so I can get a good deal on a last year's model.

    The Specialized was sweet. It felt great, and I think it's my perfect bike, but it's too spendy for me, as I've got all the other gear to buy (aerobars, shoes/pedals, etc.). The Trek wasn't my size, so I couldn't really tell (it is a small shop and they didn't have a 50). The Cannondale felt pretty good. It's aluminum, with decent components (105/Ultegra). I'm a little more stretched out than on the Specialized, but I don't think that's a problem.

    Here's the problem - the shifters were a bit of a reach for me. I was having to really stretch my fingers or move my hand slightly to make the shift. I've not got much of a riding background, so I don't know how much of a problem that would be - would I get used to it, get better at it, or should I just keep looking? Or save up some extra dough for the Ruby? Or make the 3 hour trip south to look at a Specialized Dolce and some other bikes?

    Any other thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks for all your cumulative wisdom!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Houston, Texas.
    Posts
    154
    I've no experience with fitting someone to a bike but from my own experience I do think you should be able to shift easily. I know the cannondale synapse feminine comes with short-reach shifters. You might want to try and see if that feels more comfortable for your shifter reach.
    Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be. ~Grandma Moses

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,557
    If you need to stretch your budget you could hold off on the aerobars and clipless pedals and shoes for a while. Especially if you are new to riding. I saw very few aerobars in my tri (I don't use them, either), so you could even hold of on the aeros through a few tris!

    In the long run you might be happier spending a bit more on the perfect bike now and getting accessories later, rather than spending less on a not-so-perfect bike and getting pedals and aerobars at the same time.

    Budgeting is such a pain.... when can I win the lottery?
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    9

    You know, that is a really good point

    And I hadn't even considered that option. Sometimes you get a little gear happy, you know? And the fit of the Specialized Ruby was so nice. It felt like home somehow... and I know that sounds silly!

    So now I'm leaning toward that option, which brings up another question - I've heard some people say that you have to be really, really careful with carbon because the frame integrity is easily compromised. Is this true? Because I have 3 kids and they aren't always as careful around things as I'd like them to be. And I don't know if I want to have a bike that I have to handle with kid gloves all the time. I take care of my things, but I don't want to freak out if it gets knocked over, KWIM? And at 2k for a bike, I would probably freak out.

    And also, how do I handle the LBS, because I really liked the woman I was working with, and I want to use them for everything else - all the upgrades, maintenance, etc.

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
    Posts
    5,295
    I have a Cannondale Synapse Carbon and I love the fit. It is a 47 cm. Somehow I have not had any toe overlap issues on the tiny thing. The reach is very comfortable for me. Was the Cannondale a WSD?

    Carbon will be easier to compromise, but I don't think it is going to be a problem with kids. My DH rides an aluminum Cannondale because if you wreck racing, the carbon would be easier to damage. We couldn't gamble with that at the price of bikes! You said you want to do group rides and leisure, carbon should be more comfortable the aluminum for that.

    Your shop should understand that you have to ride what fits. Sure they want you to buy a bike, but the one I use is always friendly when people bring in other bikes. You are spending money there if you use them for service and accessories.

    BTW- My second choice was a Ruby, so you can't go wrong with that!
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    WA, Australia
    Posts
    3,292
    Quote Originally Posted by kan View Post
    So now I'm leaning toward that option, which brings up another question - I've heard some people say that you have to be really, really careful with carbon because the frame integrity is easily compromised. Is this true? Because I have 3 kids and they aren't always as careful around things as I'd like them to be. And I don't know if I want to have a bike that I have to handle with kid gloves all the time. I take care of my things, but I don't want to freak out if it gets knocked over, KWIM? And at 2k for a bike, I would probably freak out.

    Thanks!
    I have two carbon bikes and three kids. What age are your kids??
    Mine are 5, 7, and 9 but were 3, 5, and 7 when I first started riding. I just sat them down and explained to them that although my bikes looked like great things to play with they were not toys. They understand that I love my bikes and that it would make me very sad if any of my bikes got damaged by them. If they want to check something out on my bike they come ask me and we go look together. One of my bikes lives in the house and I have never had a problem. My kids are all boys and very active and my carbon bikes are surviving just fine.
    The most effective way to do it, is to do it.
    Amelia Earhart

    2005 Trek 5000 road/Avocet 02 40W
    2006 Colnago C50 road/SSM Atola
    2005 SC Juliana SL mtb/WTB Laser V

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    9

    Answers to your questions

    No, the Cannondale was not a WSD and I thought the shifter issue was a perfect example of the benefits of WSD.

    My kids are 8, 4, and 2 - a boy and 2 girls in that order. I think they'd respect my wishes in that regard.

    So if a newbie goes out and spends a lot on a bike, does that make me a ... what is it, a Fred? A Frederica? I don't really care what everyone thinks - I just want a bike that I'm going to love to ride, and I think the Ruby was that bike.

    But to be sure I think I'll make a trip south and try out a few different bikes - a WSD Trek, for instance. It's hard, because I don't think I'll be able to do that for a few weeks, and I've got tax refund money that's just itching to be spent!

    And I think I'll go try on the Ruby one more time, just for fun. Heh heh.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,557
    Nope, if you spend the money on a bike because you LOVE it, no-one is gonna even think twice! What price love, eh?

    But if you spend the money on a bike because you want to impress people, weeeeellllll, that's kinda goofy.

    If you love the Ruby and it just feels right, (and if it fits your budget) don't be afraid! We all know what it is to get on a bike that just feels like "home." And believe me, sometimes that's hard to find!
    Last edited by KnottedYet; 02-07-2007 at 12:00 PM.
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    My first road bike was a Cannondale R600 WSD. The aluminum was a bumpy and uncomfortable ride. The lower end components gave me a lot of trouble, especially shifting. I never could get it into the big ring. I've owned 2 all carbon bikes since then and although you can't control what happens sometimes, I have had no issues with damage. I've had 2 crashes and nothing was damaged in either. My husband did snap his fork (on one side only, thankfully) when he crashed into a squirrel, descending at about 40 mph on a carbon bike. But since most aluminum bikes have carbon forks, that might have happened on any bike. I would go for the most bike for the $ and forgo some of the accessories, as others have stated. And hold off buying the aero bars. I know a lot of people who do tris and they don't have them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    8,548
    btw, do go for that drive and try the Dolce. IT was explained to me by
    the PT I went to (Erik Moen) that the basic geometry is the same as the Ruby.

    The componentry is not the same of course, it's all cheaper, but I testrode one myself; it's a great little bike.

    no one that i've heard from here is complaining about their Rubys though!
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,046
    Kan,
    I have the 48cm Dolce and (unless the 48cm Orbea Orca comes through ) plan on buying a Ruby at the end of the year. I tested a lot of bikes before and since I've gotten my bike and none have "fit" me quite as well. Fit is different for everyone, of course, but Specialized suits me.

    When I went shopping for a bike, I tested both the Dolce and the Ruby, but figured the Ruby was too expensive. What if I didn't care for road riding? So I got the Dolce. I planned to put 3000 miles on it before upgrading (to figure out exactly what I was looking for in a bike) but I pretty much knew after 1000 miles what I wanted: I wanted the Ruby.

    Had I gotten the Ruby to begin with, I wouldn't have to upgrade. But then again, it would be covered with scratches and bumps acquired when I first learned to use clipless pedals. Yes, you will fall at first with clipless pedals!

    Shifters: If you have problems with reaching the shifters, you can have shims placed in them to bring the levers closer to your fingers. The cables wil need to be adjusted for this. You can also have the stem shortened, if needed. Having a professional fit done will do wonders.

    Aerobars: Don't be in a hurry to get aero bars. It's extremely important to get your bikehandling skills up first! Inexperienced riders with aerobars can be a danger to themselves and those around them. You will also have to get your body used to an aerodynamic position, which depending on how flexible you are, can take time. Besides, if you're planning on triathlon, aerobars will not make much time difference in anything shorter than Olympic distance.

    Best of luck!
    Last edited by Bluetree; 02-09-2007 at 10:54 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
    Posts
    5,295
    I would buy as much bike as you can and wait on accessories (well at least ones like aerobars). We spent $600 on my first bike, before the year was up I wanted a better bike. I had to wait another year and a half to get it.

    You can't wait on shorts and such, but you could try to bargain shop those. Investing in a great bike will make you happier in the long run.
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •