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  1. #76
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Bellmore, NY
    Posts
    1,346

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    Deb, I guess I missed this thread from January. Your bike is beautiful. What a gorgeous color. I find it completely amazing how it fits in that travel box.

    I wish you must luck and enjoyment with your new bike and traveling with it.

    ~ JoAnn

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    2,024
    Deb, I am surprised a frame your size required SO MUCH dissasembly. From what I've read I thought you could get away with less. Do you think if you had more time you could have taken less stuff off, or were you being extra cautious? As an aside, the solution I adopted to minimize disassembly with my S/S bike was to pack it together with my clothes in 2 airline legal suitcases. I put the front half and bars in one case and the rest in another. I put my clothes in plastic bags to avoid grease stains. All I had to remove was the seat post, bars, pedals, and disconnect the couplers (both cable and frame).

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,556
    Quote Originally Posted by Triskeliongirl View Post
    Deb, I am surprised a frame your size required SO MUCH dissasembly. From what I've read I thought you could get away with less. Do you think if you had more time you could have taken less stuff off, or were you being extra cautious?
    You are probably right. Though it wasn't easy to fit it in the case even with all the disassembly I did. I'll try with less disassembly next time. My builder thought I should have been able to leave at least part of the crank on. But it seemed that my small frame size made the fit harder because part of the rear triangle ended up near the middle of the case where it almost interfered with the front hub. I had to call my builder to get advise on reattaching the crank arms to the Octalink bottom bracket. It would have been MUCH easier if I'd left the left crank arm attached.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    8,548
    a few pages back you wrote that you were anxious to compare the 650 wheel set to what you used to have. what do you think about it now?
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,556
    Quote Originally Posted by mimitabby View Post
    a few pages back you wrote that you were anxious to compare the 650 wheel set to what you used to have. what do you think about it now?
    I rode the 650c wheelset on a 25 mile club ride here in Maryland last night. Very different feel from the 26" wheels with mtb slicks. With the 26x1.3" tires the bike felt totally stable and bombproof over rough roads at any speed. The ride was never jarring even on major potholes. With the 650c x 23mm tires, the ride is definitely stiffer. I was using Michelin Pro Race 2 tires inflated to about 100 psi, and the tires were not remaining in contact with the road on chipseal at high speed - definitely a less than bombproof feel. Hopefully that will improve if I run at lower pressure. My intention for building 28 spoke 2-cross wheels was that the wheels would soften the ride enough to avoid this. However, I ended up using fairly stiff rims (Mavic CXP-33) with a v-section because a rim like the Open Pro wasn't available in 650c 28 hole. These wheels feel noticeably stiffer than the 700c sewup wheels (non-v rims, 36 hole, 3-cross) on my old bike, but that frame is stiffer and I got jarred badly on potholed. The sewup wheels never felt like they were losing contact with the road at high speed.

    To do: (1) Try the Michelin Pro Race tires at lower pressure. (2) Put on a cyclocomputer (just bought a Strada wireless), calibrate both wheelsets, and see if the wheels make much difference in my riding speed. If they don't, then I'll probably ride the 26" wider tires all the time because the ride is more comfortable and more stable and I can commute with weight on the bike (ie. laptop).
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Phillipston, MA
    Posts
    445
    Quote Originally Posted by DebW View Post
    geometry - Peter's advice is to design the bike for the way you use it most often, which would lead me to more of a sport geometry than a touring geometry. OTOH, I want the option for touring and expect to have this frame for 20-30 years (if i live that long), so well into retirement.
    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica View Post
    My Rambouillet I think fits the bill of what you want to do with your new bike.

    It's suitable for fast road riding, with the right tires and wheels it can go off road, and I used it to pull a trailer last year in Nova Scotia.
    I'm happy with the older steel bike I just revamped for light errands. It is a road bike with mt gearing.

    But I'm also playing around with getting a frame, similar for a use that DebW wanted for her custom - with an option for touring, but also with a geometry that can offer some go fast.

    What is it in the geometry that you really want to look for, for that kind of use - a more sport geometry than touring geometry, which isn't road geometry?

    I've been considering a Surly Long Haul Trucker frame because many people seem to be very happy with them. Would the Surly be too sluggish, if I want some go fast (knowing that of course I would not expect it to perform like my carbon fiber Ruby)?

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Phillipston, MA
    Posts
    445
    Quote Originally Posted by DebW View Post
    To do: (1) Try the Michelin Pro Race tires at lower pressure. (2) Put on a cyclocomputer (just bought a Strada wireless), calibrate both wheelsets, and see if the wheels make much difference in my riding speed. If they don't, then I'll probably ride the 26" wider tires all the time because the ride is more comfortable and more stable and I can commute with weight on the bike (ie. laptop).
    Deb, did you do this and what did you think?

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,516
    Quote Originally Posted by mudmucker View Post
    I've been considering a Surly Long Haul Trucker frame because many people seem to be very happy with them. Would the Surly be too sluggish, if I want some go fast (knowing that of course I would not expect it to perform like my carbon fiber Ruby)?
    My feeling is that the Surly will be pretty sluggish. But....folks use and love them on brevets (from what I've been reading). I have a cross check and can firmly say that any sluggishness is the engine, not the bike But I'm not sure about the wheel size difference. Both my Cross Check and my Trek 520 have 700c wheels. One of the major limitations is that there aren't very many (any?) 26" tires narrower than about 32c.

    CA
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,556
    Quote Originally Posted by mudmucker View Post
    Deb, did you do this and what did you think?
    I do ride the 26x1.3" tires most all the time. I think the difference in average speed between these wheels and the 650x23 is 0.25-0.5 mph, but I haven't put much effort into validating this. My bike has a 39" wheelbase, as opposed to a LHT with a 42" wheelbase. The Surly Cross Check has a 39.9" wheelbase and might be a good choice for touring plus faster rides plus cyclecross. You can even get the Cross Check now with S&S couplers (the Traveler's Check). I think that the longer wheelbase and slacker frame angles of the LHT become more necessary with heavier touring loads. I keep my load under 25 lb, as I told my framebuilder, and his design works great for me.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

 

 

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