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Thread: Snowshoeing

  1. #46
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    Hey, snowshoe fans!

    Just checking in this fine Autumn to say hi and are you getting excited yet thinking about snowshoeing this coming winter?

    I wanted to post this link to some nice thermal waterproof Merrill hiking boots I just ordered:
    http://www.onlineshoes.com/productpa...n=w&pcid=64085
    One cool feature on them is that they have heel ridges that are specifically designed to hold snowshoe straps nicely in place without the straps slipping down! So great! I have to get the boots big enough to wear two pairs good heavy wool socks in them for the frigid cold. Will get back with a review once I wear them a bit.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  2. #47
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    Nice looking boots, pretty good price too. Give us an update. I'm thinking about snowshoeing this winter. Do you have to have lots of snow in order to snowshoe? What do you do, just put your snowshoes on and go for a walk, hike????

  3. #48
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    Minneapolis, Minnesota
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    Glad to see this thread return to life...I'm interested in getting into snowshoeing (think it might be more convenient/affordable than XC skiing). I don't even know where to begin as far as equipment goes. There are two golf courses near our houses that are beautiful and groom trails for XC skiing. Thinking that might be a good place to start...
    2007 Trek 5000
    2009 Jamis Coda
    1972 Schwinn Suburban

    "I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a bike. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammelled womanhood."
    Susan B. Anthony, 1896

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by surgtech1956 View Post
    Nice looking boots, pretty good price too. Give us an update. I'm thinking about snowshoeing this winter. Do you have to have lots of snow in order to snowshoe? What do you do, just put your snowshoes on and go for a walk, hike????
    I just received an email that the boots have shipped, haven't gotten them yet.

    You can snowshoe in about 5 inches or more of snow. We usually get a few good deep 8+" snows every winter here and a few 5 inchers....but last year was not much, just two big ones. Hope it's not a trend.

    We live on a hill at the edge of our little small country town. There is a 2 mile trail through the woods that starts a block from our house, so there's always that. And I went into town once during a blizzard- now THAT was FUN!!!! It was just me and the snowplow guys out in the heavy snow flakes- beautiful. I shoed all around the streets of the village and no one was shoveling yet.
    Another time I went with a agirlfriend to a nature reserve with rolling fields and ponds and we have a great time hiking all over there- no paths at all!
    Once they plow the streets and shovel the sidewalks my options are more limited and I have to do the woodland trail here or go in my car somewhere else to some fields to shoe. There's a bird sanctuary with trails in a nearby town I could go to.

    Glad to see this thread return to life...I'm interested in getting into snowshoeing (think it might be more convenient/affordable than XC skiing). I don't even know where to begin as far as equipment goes. There are two golf courses near our houses that are beautiful and groom trails for XC skiing. Thinking that might be a good place to start...
    Yes it IS cheaper than getting cross country skiing equipment. But a decent pair of snowshoes will cost at least $125 i think. Cheaper than that and they dont have much crampons/teeth on the bottom and you'll slip on any hills you encounter. We have steep hills around here everywhere, so I got some with major teeth. Mine were good ones and I think I recall I paid about $200-225 for them. I've had to use them, too, climbing up and descending steep hilly trials in the woods!
    One thing i bought and don't think I'll need much is poles. I find i keep my balance better without poles (for now) I suppose they are essential for mountain shoeing, but I've found I get annoyed at having to lug them with me.
    I would think golf courses would be GREAT for snowshoeing! But you'll have to be aware that you should not "wreck" the nice smooth trails that the x-country skiiers go on- not polite to riddle their smooth grooved trails with giant Yeti pot holes from your shoes! When i see and groomed trail I stay to one side of it out of consideration for the skiiers.

    Other than the snowshoes, all you need are good warm clothes that keep the snow and cold out. Some leg gaiters (gaitors?) are really handy- they keep the snow from flipping all over your legs and from getting into your boots. I found that any of my hiking boots fit just fine into my snowshoe straps- the straps are very rugged and very adjustable to various boots.

    I am hoping for some decent snowfalls this winter.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  5. #50
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    Yep...I'd be sure to keep off the nicely groomed trails! I do need to make sure it's ok for me to get out on the golf courses though. They're public courses, and people go sledding out there in the winter, so I'm pretty sure it is ok for me to snowshoe around out there. Just want to be sure, though. They're beautiful...hills and trees, and quiet! Can't wait!

    I've looked at shoes online at REI and also wandered through the section in the store and boy, do they have a nice selection. Looks like they start right around $125, just like you mentioned, Lisa. Do you think I would regret getting something in the $150 range? Are there any really nice features missing from that level of shoe that might really keep me going?

    After such an active spring/summer/fall, I really want to carry on getting outside and enjoying the outdoors this winter. I think this might be the ticket! And no shortage of snow in MN, you know!
    2007 Trek 5000
    2009 Jamis Coda
    1972 Schwinn Suburban

    "I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a bike. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammelled womanhood."
    Susan B. Anthony, 1896

  6. #51
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    Thumbs up

    Hi Northstar,
    I am no big expert, but I can only tell you about my own experiences.

    I got Tubbs women's snowshoes. I am VERY pleased with them!

    Here is the Tubbs site:
    http://www.tubbssnowshoes.com/

    On the site, you can enter your weight and terrain, and find the right size and style recommended for you:
    http://www.tubbssnowshoes.com/products/shoefinder/
    Be sure to follow their weight/size recommendations.

    I highly recommend the "dayhiking" good crampon shoes like the "Wilderness:"
    http://www.tubbssnowshoes.com/produc...ens_Wilderness
    (if you don't have good crampons (underneath steel teeth) you will slide on clines and hills.) I also love these shoes because they have a quick easy-in/easy-out strap loosener so you don't struggle so much when sitting in the snow getting them on and off. I was worried that I wouldn't be able to fit my big chunky muckluks into them, but the shoe grip system they have fits a wide range of sized boots.
    I'm in the 155 lb range with my gear on, and I got the 25" shoes, as per Tubbs' recommendation.

    Here is the women's Wilderness shoe for sale at EasternMountainSports for $169:
    http://www.ems.com/catalog/subcatego...531&i=1&n=1000
    I think that's a really good price for an excellent shoe that's like mine from last year's models.

    Some women's ankle gaiters (I got the first ones pictured, but they have cheaper ones):
    http://www.ems.com/catalog/subcatego...=1192553998937

    I also got this snowshoe tote bag:
    http://www.ems.com/catalog/product_d...=1192554480220
    The small sized one fit my 25" shoes beautifully. It's great to hang your shoes in the closet off-season, or throw them in the car, etc.

    If I were you I wouldn't bother with getting poles for now, unless you plan on climbing the Swiss Alps.

    I hope some of this helps you hone in on what you might need. There certainly are a lot of GREAT shoes out there to choose from these days!
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, Minnesota
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    Thanks Lisa, very helpful. Great links!
    2007 Trek 5000
    2009 Jamis Coda
    1972 Schwinn Suburban

    "I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a bike. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammelled womanhood."
    Susan B. Anthony, 1896

  8. #53
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    Lisa - what type of clothing do you snowshoe in? any recommendations? thanks

  9. #54
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    Hi Surgtech,

    The only things I wear ONLY for snowshoeing are my snowshoes, my leg gaiters, and some lightweight biking rain pants over whatever warm leggings I am wearing.
    The rest of my clothes are just various combinations of my usual warm baselayers and winter clothes I also wear for cold weather biking.
    Stretchy warm leggings I can move in....extra heavy wool socks....insulated hiking boots....ski gloves....wool hat and maybe a balaclava or a neck gaiter if it's windy....soft thin merino wool base layers under everything.....vests or jackets I can move in.
    I DON'T wear heavy thick sweaters, padded snowpants or snowsuits, scarves, or puffy jackets that just weigh me down and make it hard to move well.
    Sunglasses or tinted goggles might be necessary for the snow glare or wind.
    Definitely a cell phone for emergencies. If you fall into a ravine in the snowy woods and break your leg, you need to call for help.
    Putting a thin layer of cold weather skin protectant on your face and lips really keeps them from getting windburn from the cold. There are lots of nice fancy ones available, but vaseline will do in a pinch.
    Skiiers are experts on cold weather clothes and the art of layering.
    (I am not a skiier)
    Last edited by BleeckerSt_Girl; 10-17-2007 at 10:19 AM.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  10. #55
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    Thanks Lisa. I need to revamp my winter attire. I cross country ski, but fine myself over dressing, I forget the rule that you should feel a little cool when starting out.

  11. #56
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    Is a soft shell jacket too heavy to wear snowshoeing?

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by surgtech1956 View Post
    Thanks Lisa. I need to revamp my winter attire. I cross country ski, but fine myself over dressing, I forget the rule that you should feel a little cool when starting out.
    Or you should start with an almost empty pack to hold the clothes that you are going to take off.

    I always wear a hard shell (non-goretex non-waterproof shells breathe much better) but am usually down to that and a baselayer.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa S.H. View Post
    I wanted to post this link to some nice thermal waterproof Merrill hiking boots I just ordered:
    http://www.onlineshoes.com/productpa...n=w&pcid=64085
    One cool feature on them is that they have heel ridges that are specifically designed to hold snowshoe straps nicely in place without the straps slipping down! So great! I have to get the boots big enough to wear two pairs good heavy wool socks in them for the frigid cold. Will get back with a review once I wear them a bit.
    Well I got the boots and they seem just great- very comfy and warm.
    I was surprised to find that the uppers are actually made of a non-leather heavy waterproof material, flexible and strong like rubber. They look and feel rather like leather, but are not. I like these boots, and they should work well with heavy wool socks and gaiters. They have Thinsulate lining for the cold.

    Aside from the snowshoe ridge in the back of the heel, I found that they also have a little D-ring for your gaiters to hook onto right in the front top of the foot, at the bottom of the laces (the photo sort of hides them). That will be very convenient to hook my gaiter hooks onto. Gaiters are good with this boot, since the boot is not overly high.
    Now all we need is some deep snow to try them out. Might have to wait another month for that.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  14. #59
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    What about cheaper snowshoes? I don't know if I want to spend almost $200 on snowshoes. But then I don't want to waste my money on cheap ones either. I was looking at the ones in LL Bean, don't know who the manufacturer is.

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by surgtech1956 View Post
    What about cheaper snowshoes? I don't know if I want to spend almost $200 on snowshoes. But then I don't want to waste my money on cheap ones either. I was looking at the ones in LL Bean, don't know who the manufacturer is.
    MSR Denali Classics $140, almost identical to the Denali Ascents but without the televator. Exceptional crampons for traction on steep slopes or sidehills. Easy to use pivoting binding. These are mountaineering quality shoes at an exceptional price.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

 

 

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