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Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    38

    Trek Across Maine

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    Hello everyone,
    I'm a very new member who has been posting in the "new rider"forum. I've set myself the goal of biking the Maine Lung Association's "Trek Across Maine" in June,2007.
    I've gone onto their website and printed out their recommendations for training for the event; but I wonder if any of you who participate in annual charity rides have some pointers for the New Gal on the Bike??
    Here's a quick review of what I've done so far:
    Bought a trainer and mounted my "old" bike on it just to get onto a saddle
    consistantly...one of my downfalls;consistancy.
    I'm paying off a Trek 1.2 WSD at my LBS and should have it paid off
    and in my home by the end of February.
    I brought the "old"bike into the LBS and they mounted the pedals of the
    Trek onto the bike so I could get used to them.
    I've gotten onto a plan of riding the bike 3 nights in a row, for 50 minutes and for 15 miles,(average). Then I take a night off and then start up the routine again.
    However; someone has very thoughtfully,(sob), provided me with a map of last year's Trek and presumably the same as the upcoming one. I'm becoming very intimitated...and I'm struggling with NOT to be overwhelmed, not to stare at the hills,(they've provided the elevations of the hills...grimace), not to worry about the heat, (90degrees last year), not be anxious about the whole thing.
    Anyway...have confessed all these silly things to you all; do you have any psychological steps that I could use?
    I have to say that I like getting on the bike each time, I like thinking about feeling myself getting stonger, I like the way my body is feeling, even being 55 and overweight and lazy . And, I most definitely like having this goal. I think it's going to be a wonderful thing to accomplish...

    Jan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tustin, CA
    Posts
    1,308
    I done a number of cross country road trips - bottom line, just ride your bike and get yourself in shape. Don't worry about big hills, or long distances. It's amazing what you can do when riding in an event. The other riders are very encouraging.

    I rode across Utah and climb a number of steep grades. I was definitely unprepared for the altitude and elevation gains but I just put the bike in granny and slowly rode up the hill. The first day and maybe the second will be bad. But after that, each day gets easier. I know its hard not knowing what to expect or how you will do but if you are using your trainer and riding when you can, you'll do fine.

    I would consider each week upping your time on the bike. See if you can ride at least 2 hours (as your goal). You'll need to develop saddle time (being able to sit on the saddle for long periods). Once you get that bike, start doing some hill training. Find the hills in your are and ride them, repeatedly if need be.

    This isn't rocket science. You just need to ride.
    BCIpam - Nature Girl

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    MD suburb of Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,832
    Quote Originally Posted by MaineMaid View Post
    Anyway...have confessed all these silly things to you all; do you have any psychological steps that I could use?

    I have to say that I like getting on the bike each time, I like thinking about feeling myself getting stonger, I like the way my body is feeling, even being 55 and overweight and lazy . And, I most definitely like having this goal. I think it's going to be a wonderful thing to accomplish...
    Having been in your shoes earlier this year, preparing to do the Bicycle Ride Across Nebraska in June (463 miles in 7 days, some 100F+, and yes, Nebraska has hills), I'd say you have to attack it both physically and psychologically.

    It sounds like you've got the psychological part down pretty well--liking riding, wanting to accomplish the goal, etc. I think your brain will calm down when you know your body can handle the ride.

    So I'd just plan on doing what you're doing over the winter, adding miles as bcipam says, and as soon as the weather gets better in the spring, start riding outdoors, work up to longer rides, do some hills, etc. My approach was to start commuting to work in March when the time changed, 7 miles one way and 18 miles home, and doing longer rides (up to about 50-60 miles) on weekends. By the time June rolled around I was ready to handle the long, hot days of BRAN (we had two 80+ mile windy days that were over 100 degrees).

    By the end it was all mental, having been drained physically. You may be better off since the Trek across Maine is 3 days rather than 7. 3 days is just about the right amount of time, I think.

    Have fun!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    19

    Thumbs up Trek Across Maine

    I have completed the Trek across Maine three times. So many people participate in the Trek. You will see children from 7-8 years old to adults 70-80 years old. The bikes vary as much as the people do. Two of the three years were in rain and cold. Bottom line I do not train to quit.

    It is not a flat ride!! Each day has a few good hills that are challenging. Each year I participate as a way to get in shape. The first year I completed 500+ miles of training before the ride. Now I weight or resistant train all muscle groups and then get on my trainer about 3 times a week for 45-60 minutes each time. I start training on Jan 1.


    I have been riding on my Carbon Pilot Trek. LOVE this bike! You can ride on Maine roads hitting pot holes and not feel like a jack hammer has been working on your teeth!!

    I think you have picked a great goal!

    In regards to age! I ride with a large group of ladies from 40-60 years of age.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    38

    Thanks!!

    Thank you all for replying to my posting; it truly helped. It was good hearing that I'm not chewing off more than I can chew. I did forget to mention that I 'm planning to up my mileage each week, and it was great to hear that you recommended it.
    I'm hoping that Spring comes early,(we still haven't had any snow and I have a dandelion blooming in my back yard; most years I've usually had about 5 or 6 good snow storms by now....), and I can get out in March and begin riding the road.
    I have a friend at work who has ridden the Trek about 6 times and she's acting as my mentor;grin...unfortunately she just keeps flopping her hand at me and telling me, "You're gonna do fine, I tell ya,fine", which should make me feel better but doesn't... until now. I guess she's right.
    Anyway, thanks for all the info and thanks for taking the time to hold my hand!!

    Jan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Upstate, NY
    Posts
    3

    Maine Ride?

    I plan to do a MD charity ride with my brother next year. It's a pan-New Hampshire ride, starting at the Canadian border and ending in Portsmouth. It's 250 miles over 3 days. I'm a little worried that I've bitten off more than I can chew.

    I needs some training advise. I have ridden for 2 years, putting in just over 1200 miles last year. However, I have never ridden a century, let alone 250 miles in three days! I have started my training in the gym, but I hate, hate, hate being on my trainer. It is torturous and tedious. I live in Upstate NY, and can't get on the road as often as I would like.

    Any suggestions for additional training, or how to make the trainer time more bearable?

    p.s. The Maine ride sounds wonderful.... please send a link with more information.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    697
    -I'm jealous - my DH is a "Maine-a" and when we lived in NH we did not ride so ww were never considerate of partaking in the festivities however now that we ride and LOVE IT we live in the sunny altho somewhat dull part of the south (unless you love golf and I DON'T) Maine isn't too far away but far too time consuming to partake of..................

    Did I mention I was jealous????
    ~Petra~
    Bianchiste TE Girls

    flectere si nequeo superos, Achaeronta movebo

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Maine mountains
    Posts
    109
    Hey, Maine Maid! I am a Mainer who has several friends who have ridden the Trek multiple times, and I have been "thinking" about it for several years. My son's girlfriend (age 23) asked me if I wanted to do it this year (and she didn't know I had been "thinking", otherwise known as procrastinating). So put to me directly I said "yes" in one of those hero moments that I couldn't take back! Seriously I am enthusiastic about it and I am going to put my trainer up in the living room this week and get going. I am age 63, so my goal is just to finish without doing anything spectacular. Let's keep each other motivated!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bar Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    165
    Hi Maine Maid,

    I've heard very good things about the Trek Across Maine and I'll be riding it for the first time in 2007. All of my friends who have ridden it tell me that it is a blast (depending on the weather of course) and a very supportive environment. Until this last summer I did mostly solo cycling. But a friend convinced me to ride the MS 150 (out of Standish) in August and loved it so much I did a bunch more charity and group rides.

    The TAM site has a training guide that you might want to take a look at. Building foundation miles as you are doing right now is a good approach. As the time gets closer you'll probably want to supplement the steady effort workouts with some drill work (fast cadence and power intervals) to get ready for the hills.

    But don't focus on the hills! With a good fitness base, good form, the right gearing, and a good outlook on the ride you'll be fine.

    Good luck and perhaps we'll see you at the event this year!

    traveller

    Happy New Year Everyone!
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster." -- Greg LeMond

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    38
    Woozer!!!! It looks like there's gonna be 3 of us doing it for the first time!!! This will be great!!

    Jan

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1

    Hello new comer.

    I totally hear what you are saying, I have been training all summer and all of fall and still riding 30 miles a day right up to Jan 9th.. Can you believe this weather. Let me tell you a little about myslef. I just got serious last April after retireing from Central Maine Power Co. I am now 63 years old and I can ride 30 plus miles three days in a row. I an scared to death of the hills everyone is talking about. I sure hope I can doit. Hopefully the inforamtional meeting will help calm some of my fears. Helpp

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bar Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    165
    Hey BB,

    Sounds to me like you have a good fitness foundation for cycling if you are doing 30 miles on multiple days. Very cool!

    Don't fear the hills...just start finding some hilly routes and start practicing hill climbing. I don't know what kind of bike you have but it probably has gearing that will be appropriate for any of the hills on the Trek course. There are specific techniques for climbing hills that you can read about but for me it comes down to the following:

    1) Relax. When you see a hill coming up, smile. Even if it looks like a monster steep thing just smile and if you can, laugh outloud. Sounds weird, I know. But it does work.

    2) Release the death grip on your handlebars. All of that tension robs your body of strength. Think of flowing over the hill. Breathe deeply. Keep your head and chin up as you climb...don't hunch over as this makes it more difficult for your lungs to deliver oxygen to your muscles.

    3) Find a cycling cadence/rhythm where you can work both in and out of the saddle. If you aren't used to riding/climbing out of the saddle practice it before the Trek.

    4) When feel like you are at your limit on a climb, pick a point up ahead and focus on making it to that point. Or, tell yourself that you will do another 20 peddle strokes. Once you complete the goal, set another one.

    When you make it to the top of the climb, let out a loud WHOOPIE! and don't care who hears it

    If you aren't from a part of Maine that has hills, try to find a place that does to practice. I'm up here on Mount Desert Island and we have lots of hills to choose from and it is a great place to bike!

    Hope to see you at the Trek!

    -traveller
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster." -- Greg LeMond

 

 

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