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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,409

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    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica
    PS Lisa with bar ends - straight up for the rear is the easy gears, the middle is the middle gears, straight down is the hard gear. Yes there is some variance in there, but this line of thinking works for me. And it doesn't need to be exact, you just need to glance to keep from cross chaining.
    Yes, thanks, I have been using this same thinking, and it's working pretty well for me. I'm doing ok!
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    830
    Quote Originally Posted by emily_in_nc
    Actually, this advice can be a little dangerous. You should shift your front chainring before you run out of gears in back. If you are in your middle chainring and shift all the way to your largest cog (or sometimes even second largest) in back before shifting to "granny" in front (if you need it), you have a very good chance of dropping your chain to the inside. Been there, done that! It will stop you dead on a climb, making it very hard to get going again once you stop and put your chain back on. Much better is to shift in front only when you're, say, on the third cog in back. It puts much less stress on your drivetrain and you are much less likely to drop your chain.
    That's why I said it was overly simplified. Doing what I suggested one time would show the rider that she needed to be in a couple of gears harder in the back (smaller cog). So once she got to the biggest cog she would then know to shift up two gears before droping down into her smallest chainring. This would then naturally lead into knowing when to shift into her smallest chainring without doing the double shifting....a learning process.
    As we must account for every idle word, so must we account for every idle silence." ~Benjamin Franklin

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chi-town
    Posts
    3,265
    I'm with you, mimi. Every bike I've ever owned has had numbers to tell me what gear I'm in. Not the Bianchi. So I do it by feel. I realized I like the numbers because it lets me know how far "up" or "down" I have to go before I need to shift from big to little ring. Doing it by feel is working pretty well.
    Run like a dachshund! Ride like a superhero! Swim like a three-legged cat!
    TE Bianchi Girls Rock

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,684
    Quote Originally Posted by li10up
    That's why I said it was overly simplified. Doing what I suggested one time would show the rider that she needed to be in a couple of gears harder in the back (smaller cog). So once she got to the biggest cog she would then know to shift up two gears before droping down into her smallest chainring. This would then naturally lead into knowing when to shift into her smallest chainring without doing the double shifting....a learning process.
    I think Emily's advice is excellent. I've met many a rider that did not figure out why they kept dropping their chain -- and many of them would fall on steep climbs as a consequence, not to mention damage to the frame.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    747
    There are very few hills where I live and I hardly ever shift, so the only time this happens to me on my Bianchi is when my husband has been working on it or riding it and has left it in some weirdo gear and I don't notice until we are on our ride. I can see the front chain ring okay (not that that helps, I think I have been off the middle chain ring once in each direction; the triple is totally wasted on me) but I can't see the rear, so if I really can't tell by feel I just ride ahead of him and make him tell me what gear I'm in.

    If I don't start riding some place with hills I should probably sell that bike, because if all I ever use is "middle/middle," with occasional forays into "middle/left of middle" and "middle/right of middle," I could probably get by with a three-speed Raleigh.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,684
    Xeney, you can always come with me on one of my hill-seeking rides!
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by salsabike
    So...I used to have indicators on the Sirrus, but when I got the Eros Donna without them, I just learned to go by feel, always being careful not to crosschain. No problems so far at all. And I really don't like looking down when I ride.
    I also ride a Sirrus (it really is a good commuter, even if it's not a fancy road bike with drop bars) and while I like the indicators, I use them very little and instead ride by feel. Why? Well, two reasons. First of all, I learned to ride with gears on an old Univega hybrid, and it didn't have any markings. Second, I was doing a large part of my riding at night, and since the indicators aren't backlit, they were useless. Not that lit indicators wouldn't be pretty cool.
    Aperte mala cm est mulier, tum demum est bona. -- Syrus, Maxims
    (When a woman is openly bad, she is at last good.)

    Edepol nunc nos tempus est malas peioris fieri. -- Plautus, Miles Gloriosus
    (Now is the time for bad girls to become worse still.)

 

 

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