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View Full Version : Sunscreens can damage skin, researchers find



jobob
08-30-2006, 11:03 AM
RIVERSIDE, Calif. Are sunscreens always beneficial, or can they be detrimental to users? A research team led by UC Riverside chemists reports that unless people out in the sun apply sunscreen often, the sunscreen itself can become harmful to the skin.

[...]

"For now, the best advice is to use sunscreens and re-apply them often the Skin Cancer Foundation recommends every two hours, and especially after sweating or swimming, which can wash away sunscreen to reduce the amount of UV radiation from getting through to filters that have penetrated the skin," Bardeen said. "This, in turn, would reduce ROS generation."

full article at:
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-08/uoc--scd082806.php

IVIIkkiS
09-02-2006, 01:21 PM
I always wondered about that. Because I burn so easily, I always have to have sunscreen on. But when I keep reapplying it while i'm riding because I feel I'm sweating it off, I think my skin starts to suffocate and my body begins to feel stiffled. Thank you for the article thought.

latelatebloomer
09-02-2006, 04:00 PM
Interesting to me that you feel "stifled" by sunscreen. I recently got overheated on a midday ride, and secretly felt that in part it was due to applying a heavier sunscreen to protect myself from the early afternoon sun!

light_sabe_r
09-03-2006, 07:54 PM
Interesting that it's been a well known fact and the source of advertising campaigns (More than anything else, campaigns by the sunscreen companies themselves as well as the Cancer council) for years down here in Australia that Suncreens must be reapplied every two hours or so... esp if you're sweating or participating in water activities...

Since sunscreen moisterisers for body are bloody expensive I've been starting to mix 50:50 lots of body moisturiser and 30+ (max Australian rating) Sunscreen together so my shaved legs don't dry out.

I never walk out of the house without putting this mix on, I haven't been burnt since November last year (when I FORGOT) and I have "trial size" sunscreen bottle I keep refilling. It fits perfectly in my jersey pockets and I reapply every 2 hours or so when riding or just out and about.

My mum's had 3 skin cancers removed, my dad one, and I used to work for a Skin cancer screening centre. I never leave home without it!

KnottedYet
09-03-2006, 09:27 PM
Sunscreen is my friend. Hats with big brims are my friends. SPF shirts are my friends.

I always wear a sunscreen with a physical block as well as a chemical screen. (The Eureka report is talking about the chemical screens.) Dermatone purely physical block SPF 15 (very greasy paste) goes over the Banana Boat or Hawaiian Tropic SPF 30 in key spots during heavy outdoor stuff.

Can also put Dermatone paste on the lips if you don't mind the smell.

The waterfree paste (in the little blue tin) works much MUCH better for me than the "water proof" lotion in the white bottle.

Any bad effects from the sunscreens and sunblocks I use are more than outweighed by the benefits I get by using them.

ChickWithBrains
02-26-2007, 03:53 PM
They are not saying sunscreen is bad for you!!!

They are saying that people don't reapply often enough, and because of it, have even more increased sun exposure. Perhaps if they hadn't put it on in the first place, they would have worn better sun protective clothing or stayed out of the sun. But the sunscreen itself is not what is harmful!!!

DrBadger
02-26-2007, 04:26 PM
They are not saying sunscreen is bad for you!!!

They are saying that people don't reapply often enough, and because of it, have even more increased sun exposure. Perhaps if they hadn't put it on in the first place, they would have worn better sun protective clothing or stayed out of the sun. But the sunscreen itself is not what is harmful!!!



This is partially correct. According to the article when the UV filters penetrate the skin and begin to react with UV radition (because additional sunscreen wasn't applied) they actually generate even more of these Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which cause much of the damage. So basically, if you apply sunscreen only once when going outside, and don't reapply, you are likely exposing yourself to even more ROS that you would have if you didn't apply sunscreen at all.

But yes, the over all conclusion is still that sunscreen is very important, and MUST be applied correctly, and often enough, to be truly beneficial.

Interesting article Jo, thanks for posting!

Dianyla
02-26-2007, 04:32 PM
I've already been avoiding the specific agents named in that study (octylmethoxycinnamate, benzophenone-3 and octocrylene) for some time now because there is some debate over carcinogenicity. It hasn't been proven, but it hasn't been ruled out either. Also, most of the sunscreen brands that use these UV agents also contain questionable ingredients like parabens as preservatives.

IMO, this article just gives me one more reason to stick to sunscreens that are based on zinc/titanium oxides. Granted, they don't spread on as easily or feel as nice as the really slick brands like Neutrogena, but they're typically more effective (higher SPF) and they are not as toxic or irritating to the skin. Maybe I'm just being paranoid, but I'd rather use what seems like the safest option whenever possible.

KnottedYet
02-26-2007, 07:05 PM
I'm supposed to wear this cr@p every day. (once a cancer patient, always a cancer patient) and I also lean toward the physical blocks (oxides and clothing). I use the chemical blocks when I know I'm going to be sweating or swimming, just because they do absorb into the skin and work after the solar radiation has penetrated your flesh. (kind of a last-ditch protection in my book)

Wear your sunscreen correctly! Wear protective clothing! Hooray for brimmed HATS! (block 90% of sun you may encounter)

Trek420
02-26-2007, 07:16 PM
Oh heck, let's just all stay indoors. Just kidding!! Really. :p :rolleyes: :cool:

crazycanuck
02-27-2007, 02:46 AM
All good aussies & kiwis know to Slip, Slop, Slap :)

C