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View Full Version : Yea Me! (with crossed fingers)m but still have tire ?'s



plantluvver
06-14-2006, 10:52 PM
You all missed my prior post of whining and self-pity. My browser (wisely for once) fouled up. And I decided to just change the durn tire, instead of relogging in, and whining some more. I think I've got it, but I have some questions. (The bike is an old ten speed, a Schwinn LeTour with a plain (1020) steel frame.

The new tire (rear) says to inflate to 90 PSI and the old one to 100PSI. Because of my weight (260 lbs.), I would like to keep the pressure as high as possible, would it be okay to overinflate the new tire by 10 PSI? I am wondering if I should buy a tire with a higher pressure rating.

On the other hand, the front tire is really crummy, it is all crackled, and it is possible the sidewall failed from age, not from rubbing against my buckle (though I know I did hear the buckle rubbing). I suspect it is an original tire, and I think the bike is an 1981 or somewhere about then.

Another question is whether this tire could be used on my other bike's rim. The rim size is 27 x 1 1/8, versus 27 x 1 1/4.

It is possible that the bike may be retired soon, due to excessive wear on the chain and rear sprockets.

I noticed one other thing that seemed alarming at first, but it may not be such a problem as I first thought.
I noticed that when I turned the axle in the wheel, one side of it was bent. The side with the gears. This scared me, because I thought my wheel was wobbling around. Then I realized that the axle actually remains fixed. So it might not be a serious problem.

I would appreciate any input into this problem. I expect to be riding at night on a not well travellled road (but still in the city). So I want to have a reliable bike.

In the meantime, I will start working on my other bike on Saturday probably. I was told that the headset is a little loose, and I should replace the rear brake and gear cables, but the wear on the chain is still acceptable.

Once I get in gear, I will probably get some miles in by shopping garage sales for my next bike.

Mary

CorsairMac
06-14-2006, 10:56 PM
I could be wrong (often am) but it's my understanding you do Not want to over inflate your tires. If it says 90 psi, then you should only put in 90 psi. As for the axle issue, I can't much help you there but I know several women here wrench their own and/or others bikes. They might be able to help you better.

Goodonya for bike commuting tho. You might consider taking the bike into your LBS for a good going-over. Our shop will do a maintainence check for about $30, might be worth looking into just for safetys' sake.

plantluvver
06-15-2006, 12:04 AM
I called one bike shop and they said $200.00 for a tune up.:eek: My bike isn't worth that.
The LeTour, (that I changed the tire on). I took to a repair workshop a few weeks ago. This is why I feel better riding it, than the other, better quality Schwinnn Traveller bike.

I have never ridden the Schwinn Traveller at all. I forgot I even had it. It was stuck in the loft of my garage. I bought it as a "spare" years ago. I had great trouble getting used to biking, and knew if I ever had a mechanical problem, I would be likely to drop out, so I felt a spare was good insurance. It was $50.00 at Goodwill at the time. Meanwhile, some of the cables got rusty (Maybe my garage roof has a small leak?)

I took it into a shop and they looked it over very quickly (for free) recommended some repairs, I bought the parts. On Saturday I will go to a bike clinic that is held weekly. Tried to go to one tonight (same shop that did the quickie inspection), but they had to cancel, because they were short staffed.

I hope to learn enough to take care of my own repairs. I have much more time than money. Besides, it will probably take less time to fix myself as to take it into a shop. Plus, there is the satisfaction of being self-sufficient, and taking care of breakdowns.

Once, my chain came off and jammed between the frame and rear gears. Since the rear wheel wouldn't turn, I had to carry the bike for over a mile.Bruised up my calf since the pedals kept hitting my leg :mad: If only I had had a wrench! Suburban highway area, so no pay phones (pre-cell phones).

I am angry at myself for not learning bike maintainence sooner. I guess that I always thought that if it wasn't broke, don't mess with it.:o

Maybe now that I am getting middle aged I am appreciating the value of maintainence:rolleyes:

Mary

DebW
06-15-2006, 06:12 AM
The new tire (rear) says to inflate to 90 PSI and the old one to 100PSI. Because of my weight (260 lbs.), I would like to keep the pressure as high as possible, would it be okay to overinflate the new tire by 10 PSI? I am wondering if I should buy a tire with a higher pressure rating.

Another question is whether this tire could be used on my other bike's rim. The rim size is 27 x 1 1/8, versus 27 x 1 1/4.

I noticed one other thing that seemed alarming at first, but it may not be such a problem as I first thought.
I noticed that when I turned the axle in the wheel, one side of it was bent. The side with the gears. This scared me, because I thought my wheel was wobbling around. Then I realized that the axle actually remains fixed. So it might not be a serious problem.

Mary

(1) Don't inflate over the stated rating on the tire. It may blow off the rim if you do. I wouldn't invest in a new tire just to get a higher pressure rating unless the 90 lb tires keep failing on you.

(2) You can probably get away with a 27 x 1 1/4 tire on a 27 x 1 1/8 rim. Measure the rim widths of your 2 bikes to see if they are really different. They may not be. In any case, you can try it and see if it work.

(3) A bent axle should be replaced. Bent axles are pretty common on bikes of that vintage (bolt on axle, not quick release, right?) That's one reason that freewheeled hubs were replaced with freehubs/cassettes, to put the hub bearing closer to the bike frame on the freewheel side. A bent axle will put excess wear on your hub bearings and misalign the chain and freewheel. It shouldn't cause catastrophic failure but it should be fixed. Ask your LBS if they can get the part, or try www.loosescrews.com. To do the replacement yourself, you'd need a freewheel puller and cone wrenches.

plantluvver
06-15-2006, 09:58 AM
I didn't state it well, but is it better to use the stated pressure on both tires, 100 on front, 90 on rear, or bring the front down to 90 PSI.

Also, this is the bike with bad chain wear. And possibly, skipping even with the old worn chain. (My technique is pretty rough, after not riding a ten speed for a few years. Last year I didn't ride at all, and before that, I was mostly on a three speed.)

Does it sounds like I may be using this bike mostly for garage sales, shopping for her replacement.:confused:

In your opinion what vintage bike is going to be easiest/cheapest to find parts for? Or are good parts hard to find?

Of course, I do intend on checking out some brand new bikes, just to see what I am missing.;) (Until I fall hard for a pretty coat of paint).

Mary

Nanci
06-15-2006, 10:01 AM
Usually the local community college/adult education will have semi-annual bike maintenance classes in conjunction with a LBS mechanic/owner. The one I took was really fun, really easy, and we did _everything_. A few weeks later, I was out riding trails, and my derailleur wasn't shifting right, and I hung it up by the nose of the saddle in a tree (makeshift bike rack) and adjusted it myself! Of course, three or four years later, I probably still couldn't do that- so I need a refresher course...

I read somewhere that tire pressure is recommended for a 150 pound rider. I think I posted either an article, or a link to an article, probably under the heading "tire pressure" which advised filling tires at lower than the rated pressure, and why. I'll see if I can find it.

Nanci

Nanci
06-15-2006, 10:03 AM
You can read this issue online at http://www.roadbikerider.com/233tt.htm

Uncle Al: Inflation Revelation o^o o^o o^o o^o o^o o^o


Tire pressure is one of the most controversial and misunderstood elements of road riding. Most roadies are under the mistaken impression that unless pressure is well over 100 pounds per square inch (psi) it's like they'll be dragging around a boat anchor. Tire manufacturers perpetuate this myth by stamping a Maximum Tire Pressure value on the sidewall. For road tires, this can range from 110 psi to an astronomical 170 psi. Combine these pressures with the super-stiff, radial-spoked wheels many riders are now using, and the result is some serious self-abuse.

Based on 40 years of wrenching and my discussions with tire experts and pro riders, there's no compelling reason to run more than 95 psi for 95% of your riding. Our roads are deteriorating faster than politicians can spend our tax dollars, and really high pressure means a really harsh ride. I could also mention poor cornering, short tire life, and the promise of many punctures.

The key here is to ride the tire size that matches your weight. Many roadies are running 700x23C no matter what they weigh. If you're over 180 lbs. (82 kilos), 25C is a better choice. For us "Clydesdales" over 205 lbs. (93 kilos), 28C is the smart size. I'm talking fast recreational riding here, not racing or touring. Racers can go narrower and tourers should go wider.

If your tire size corresponds to your weight, you can run 90-95 psi and not risk pinch flats. I guarantee you will roll just as fast or faster than you think you do on higher pressures. You'll descend and corner faster (and safer). You'll suffer fewer punctures, and your tires will last as much as five times longer.

So if you're a max-pressure person, try lowering the psi and upping the size (if your weight says you should). Wean yourself off high pressure bit by bit if you wish till you?re down to 90 psi front and 95 rear. Then experience the suppleness your tires are supposed to possess. Check out how much smoother cornering is, how much more comfortable you are, and how much less fatigue you feel at the end of your rides. I bet you'll be pleasantly surprised.

Nanci
06-15-2006, 10:10 AM
No, your tires don't have to be the exact same pressure. But close is probably good.

We've been getting a lot of new riders in my group, on very old hand-me-down bikes. They have to put a lot of money into making the bike run, and then are still stuck with less-than-modern-day equipment, with all its advantages such as better, easier to work components, more gears, easier to reach shifters, etc. I feel badly that they are struggling with an older bike as well as with riding in general. I feel like a new, or at least only a couple years old, bike would make riding a lot more enjoyable.

Still, it's kind of like having an old paid-off car- easier to get nickel and dimed to death than invest in a new one, if you just can't afford it.

plantluvver
06-15-2006, 11:34 AM
I feel like I have really hooked into a major resource at this site. So much better than reading a book or article and wondering how it applied to ME. I've learned more about bicycles in a week than I ever knew in 20 years. Even though I once tried to restore one all by my lonesome with a book. NEVER figure it out. Replaced it with a Department store bike:eek:

Mary

plantluvver
06-15-2006, 12:29 PM
Weird, I get a blank page from that link, but I found a Q and A where he discussed tire pressure.

So it sounds like it is either tire width or volume that is important when considering the weight of a rider (the two are probably pretty much proportional. Right?) But inflation should stay constant, for a given performance.

I have old tires 27 x1/14 , and I am not familiar with those sizes. But I've ridden this bike and wheels in the past, (but I may have been thirty pounds lighter). I guess I'll just see how it goes. It sounds like this baby's days are numbered.:( (She's been with me a long time.)

I can, and will buy a new bike if it is warranted. I am a cheapskate, but I was planning on replacing a car a few months ago, so I can entirely justify the purchase of a bike. ( I got an small inheritance from my dad last year, and I was planning to make a purchase of some kind of importance even small windfalls are rare . Hoped to pay off my mortgage, but instead I have been loaning it to my son, but some is just dribbling away.)

It will take me some time to decide what my price range should be. Your advice may save me some bucks on my next purchase. (Can shops trade out any components like wheels and such?)

Are there any books geared toward us Clydesdales? I think I've seen some websites, but I've been spending the major part of my time right here at this forum. :D

Mary