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View Full Version : CamelBak Waist Pack or Full Backpack?



Robbin_G
03-22-2006, 08:06 AM
I get hot really really easy and predict that a CamelBak backpack will make it worse. I like the wind on my back. Has anyone cycled with the waist pack style? Does the hip strap impede your peddling?

http://www.rei.com/product/47989716.htm?vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPING_TOC

SadieKate
03-22-2006, 08:24 AM
Is this for mountain biking or road biking?

snapdragen
03-22-2006, 08:26 AM
I didn't like the waist pack, but then, I've never been a fanny pack lover. I know some people who set up the waist pack as a handlebar bag. Not sure how they handled the tube.

There are other brands besides Camelbak - check them out, you might like them better.

Robbin_G
03-22-2006, 08:31 AM
Is this for mountain biking or road biking?

It would be for road biking. I thought about a bike mounted solution too.

Nanci
03-22-2006, 08:46 AM
The waist-mounted CamelBak pretty much sucks for running, too- it's hot and centered too high- so most people are either using a single or double bottle pack, or a backpack CamelBak. If you like the wind on your back, you aren't going to like any CamelBak-type thing.

If I were you, I'd put two bottle cages on the bike frame, and if that isn't enough, then a seat-post mounted double bottle holder- but be aware that the nickname for these is "Bottle Launcher-" so the seat-post holder isn't the most secure thing...

If you have aerobars, there's a bottle holder that goes between the bars, with a bottle that fits in there.

Nanci

DeniseGoldberg
03-22-2006, 08:54 AM
I use a Camelbak Rogue, which is a backpack style but is pretty minimal. It does have room to add some small items (like an energy bar or two) in addition to the reservoir - but it's not what I would call a full backpack. It's relatively narrow. And yes, it's hotter wearing it than not, but on hot days I want the extra liquid. I usually carry water in my Camelbak and Gatorade in my water bottles.

--- Denise

DebW
03-22-2006, 09:15 AM
I use fanny packs on the bike and prefer them to backpacks as there is less fabric against you and thus a smaller area gets sweated up. Mine sits on my hips rather than waist, and the strap is no problem unless it is too loose. However, you have to be careful of the hydration tube as it easily catches on things and gets in the way. Most of the time I just use water bottles and carry other stuff (clothes for work) in the fanny pack.

Robbin_G
03-22-2006, 11:42 AM
I should have mentioned that I'm inquiring after seeing the other thread on inablity to go for a water bottle while riding. I too fall into that category.

I was doing a timed placement for a training group and went the entire 20 miles without a single sip when I needed one. Bad bad bad. :confused:

Blueberry
03-22-2006, 11:50 AM
I had a regular camelbak (shoulder straps) and never used it because my shoulders would be so blasted sore at the end of a long ride. It was great for the water, but the pain wasn't worth it. Forgot the camelbak on a trip to asheville and DH surprised me with a waist back from Liberty Cycles.

I *love* it. No sore shoulders. Doesn't interfere with my road bike position. Also doesn't hold as much water, so I have to either re-fill or carry 2 bottles too (usually use those to refill the camelbak b/c that's where I drink from given the option). Not the prettiest thing in the world for those of those with a "middle roll", but who cares if it works!

Dianyla
03-22-2006, 01:23 PM
I use a Camelbak Rogue, which is a backpack style but is pretty minimal. It does have room to add some small items (like an energy bar or two) in addition to the reservoir - but it's not what I would call a full backpack. It's relatively narrow. And yes, it's hotter wearing it than not, but on hot days I want the extra liquid.
I've got a Camelbak Mule which is long and slim and expands nicely - it's a great commuting backpack. It's just big enough to hold my clothes and the bikelock. On long rides I use it to carry extra inner tubes, extra layer, food, sunscreen, cellphone/wallet, etc. Yeah, it's hot, but... still worth it to me to be able to carry 100 oz of water and all my other shtuff. Then again, I don't live in a truly hot/desert environment.

BTW, if you make sure you get a pack with a waist strap you should make sure that more of the weight goes onto the waist strap and keep the shoulder straps loose.


I usually carry water in my Camelbak and Gatorade in my water bottles.
Ditto that, I always keep cytomax/gatorade in bottles. Never put anything sugary into the camelback reservoir - that's a moldy disaster waiting to happen! :eek:

susan.wells
03-22-2006, 02:46 PM
I also have the Camelbak Rogue. I have used it the last two years. Unlike others though I do carry whatever sports drink I happen to be consuming. I use the Camelbak cleasing tablets to clean it after every ride. I have yet to master using bottles effectively. I just ordered the Camelbak Dream (http://www.teamestrogen.com/products.asp?pID=14941) to try.

Susan

snapdragen
03-22-2006, 04:48 PM
My pack is made by Ultimate Direction - called the Sip Stream. I love the tank, it opens at the top. To close it you roll it down and fasten with velcro. I've never had a leak. They don't make the Sip Stream any more, but they have a variety of styles.

Ultimate Direction (http://www.ultimatedirection.com/product.php?page=bike)

REI also has a few of their own Novara brand, they use Nalgene (sp?) tanks, and have a very nifty magnet to hold the tube when you're not drinking.

newfsmith
03-22-2006, 05:26 PM
I converted a Flash flo to a handlebar bag by simply cutting off the ends of the waist belt and then threading velcro straps through the buckles that cinch the bag to the waist belt. Because it isn't a big resevoir the weight on the handlebars is not enough to interfer with handling. By adding a retractable ID card holder to the hose and my jersey it is just as convenient to use as one on your back, but no extra heat or strain on back. I'm working on making a holder for a resevoir that would attach to the bike seat. There is also the "neverReach" system used by triathletes, which isn't that much more expensive than most hydration backs.

Nanci
03-23-2006, 04:23 AM
This discussion is on a randonneuring list I'm on. The first guy is talking about some race in France and why fenders are a good idea. Apparently there had been a lot of rain, and a lot of cow traffic on the road.

"When the riders sped through these stretches, the excrement
sprayed out in all directions -- onto the riders' faces and onto the
mouthpieces of their water bottles. Consequently, when a rider
took a swig from his bottle, he also unwittingly swallowed millions
of E-coli bacteria. Within 12hours of the E-coli contamination, the
riders suffered severe upset stomachs with vomiting and diarrhea."

Second guy replies:

Several years ago on a brevet in southern Wisconsin, we experienced the same type of weather and manure covered roads. Interestingly, those who were using camel bag-type hydration packs did not have same problem of those who relied on water bottles.

Robbin_G
04-06-2006, 02:42 PM
Hi all,

Inspired by Nanci's jacket review:

I thought I would update that I bought a Camelbak Dream. Since it's not been hot, I've liked it. We'll see how I do when it gets really hot. I thought about putting some of those Rubbermaid Blue Ice sheets in there, but then I don't like really cold water either. I'm such a whiner. :rolleyes:

Other than that, if you're in the market for one, I'd say get this one! The bungie on the outside has held my rain jacket the last two rides and the little interior pocket holds more stuff than you'd think! (one sipper on each side, but the pocket goes all the way through.) There are little mesh pockets inside the pocket so things arent floating around. Also a key fob. There is also a zipper pocket on the flap the covers the resevoir cap. I put my cards and money in there.

I hope I still like it when it gets hot. :D

madisongrrl
04-06-2006, 05:12 PM
This discussion is on a randonneuring list I'm on. The first guy is talking about some race in France and why fenders are a good idea. Apparently there had been a lot of rain, and a lot of cow traffic on the road.


I sometimes use this type of bottle to reduce the nasty factor...

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=5909&parent_category_rn=4927687&vcat=REI_SSHP_CYCLING_TOC

withm
04-06-2006, 06:21 PM
I too have the Camelback rogue - never bothered me that it was on my back but 30 yrs of scuba diving makes a camelback feel like a feather....

I did learn a good trick though - I half fill the reservoir, seal it up, and blow air into it via the tube to make it balloon out. Then put it in the freezer overnight (or just keep it there till I need it).

Then when I'm ready to ride, I take it out, and fill the remainder with water (filtered). You will probably have to run some hot water over the opening to get it open, and also where the hose enters the bottom of the reservoir to make sure the path is not blocked. Result - I always have cold water, but not too cold. Even on a 40 mile ride in very hot weather I still had cold water at the end. Having the "ice" probably helps to keep the unit a little cooler, so it's not hot on my back, but there is enough insulation/padding in the camelback itself I think to prevent it. And the ice seems to last several hours. If I'm on a really long ride, and it's really hot, I have been known to stop and buy a bottle of water, and top off the Camelback just in case.

My only real complaint? The first sip or two of water on a hot day is HOT! UGH! I have been known to just spit it out so I can get to the cold water. I've seen neoprene sleeves for the hoses but wondered if they were enough to prevent the excessive cooking of the water residual in the hose?

caligurl
04-06-2006, 06:26 PM
another rogue user.... fortunately i was able to give hubby's a test ride or two before i bought my own... i thought sure i'd hate it... i was pleasantly surprised that it's VERY comfortable and didn't make me any hotter!

oh... and another cyclist gave me a great tip! he saw me sucking out some water (what was in the tubing) and spitting it out (cuz it was hot)... he told me to blow back in after i drink (so there is no water in the tubing) then you don't waste water by spitting it!

ladyjai
04-06-2006, 06:26 PM
I live in a desert, it gets to 115+ and i've ridden in it. I have a hydrapak and a camelbak, and both keep water cool for a couple hours. You should drink it faster than it heats to be too warm.

Robbin_G
04-06-2006, 06:36 PM
The Dream is 2" shorter than the Rogue and I'm short waisted so i thought I would try it first.

withm
04-06-2006, 08:38 PM
oh... and another cyclist gave me a great tip! he saw me sucking out some water (what was in the tubing) and spitting it out (cuz it was hot)... he told me to blow back in after i drink (so there is no water in the tubing) then you don't waste water by spitting it![/QUOTE]


Good idea - I hope I can remember that trick when I next use the thing - Generally use water bottles until it gets a LOT warmer than it is now. When will we ever have a nice sunny day with wind under 15kt?

madisongrrl
04-06-2006, 09:06 PM
I too have the Rogue....it's not bad for trail riding. It can hold tools, a tube, co2, gels etc. Racing with it sucks though....Last year, I didn't have anyone who could do my hand-ups so I had no choice but to use it. My gatoraid tasted like warm pee after 30 minutes of racing and my back was pure sweat. But it's better than running out of something to drink and getting heat exhaustion.

I might try to buy a smaller/lighter pack for races that I don't have hand-ups at. Any suggestions?

caligurl
04-07-2006, 07:43 AM
i fill my camelback (and water bottles) with ice.. then water... even in the hot desert temps i usually have some ice left in the camelback or it at least stays nice and cool! the bottles don't last too long in the heat of the summer (i use polar insulated bottles).... i HATE warm water! i'm less inclined to drink it once it gets warm and i'm ONLY drink it when i absolutely need to..

Nanci
04-07-2006, 07:52 AM
I think the insulated tubing helps a little. Keeps as much bacteria/algae whatever it is from growing in there, too, since there's no light.

Nanci