PDA

View Full Version : Clipping in question



Catrin
06-05-2011, 05:53 AM
Now I've returned to clipping in, and I do love my Frogs, an old problem has returned that is directly related to it.

I've no problem clipping in OR out. The problem, and it is somewhat embarrassing, is that I spend so much time overthinking how to stop while clipped in that my stops are.....shall we say they are less than graceful. So much that I find myself mapping out routes with mainly right-hand turns and I actually learned how to snack while riding yesterday so I wouldn't need to stop :) :o

It isn't the actual process of unattaching my foot from the pedal that is the problem - that part is easy. I think that the additional step adds a step to the "stopping movements" I've learned which just confuses my body a bit. I learned one way and now I am complicating things. I am VERY glad I changed my mind about clipping in on the mountain bike just yet!

Have others gone through this ungainly stopping process when making the move to clipless? Just wanting to hear that this is a normal part of the process.

indysteel
06-05-2011, 06:21 AM
How do you come to a stop out of curiosity? Are you unclipping just one foot or both?

I would suggest going to a parking lot and practicing over and over again until it starts to feel more second nature. If you're not already, just unclip one foot to stop. If you're using two, I just think that overcomplicates the process, especially in emergency situations.

I have to admit that this isn't an issue I've had much trouble with. I do unclip a bit before a stop just so I'm ready to put a foot down. That's not to say that what you're going through is highly unusual, but I'd encourage to work on it, rather than avoid it, because you're otherwise just going to develop even more anticipatory anxiety over it.

Catrin
06-05-2011, 06:32 AM
How do you come to a stop out of curiosity? Are you unclipping just one foot or both?

I would suggest going to a parking lot and practicing over and over again until it starts to feel more second nature. If you're not already, just unclip one foot to stop. If you're using two, I just think that overcomplicates the process, especially in emergency situations.

I have to admit that this isn't an issue I've had much trouble with. I do unclip a bit before a stop just so I'm ready to put a foot down. That's not to say that what you're going through is highly unusual, but I'd encourage to work on it, rather than avoid it, because you're otherwise just going to develop even more anticipatory anxiety over it.

I did practice a bit yesterday, and had a little fall where I got caught up in my saddle - bruised girly bits :eek: not so bad that I couldn't ride for 20 miles though :)

I unclip with my right foot before I stop and rest my right heel on the pedal so I don't re-clip in. As I apply my brakes and come to a stop I lean the bike a bit to the right as my foot comes down to the ground. I think that is how I do it, it is a pretty quick process. My left foot remains clipped in until I am at a complete stop.

I do have a bit of anticipatory anxiety over it, but it will come with practice. Of course the key is to DO it more often rather than seeking ways to not have to stop until the end of my ride... Generally it has not been a real problem, I just think my body is a bit confused. After all, I have close to 2,000 miles on BMX pedals and only a few hundred on clipless. I will practice more...

indysteel
06-05-2011, 06:38 AM
Your process sounds fine; you just gotta do it more. When I first got my Keos (I already had been using SPDs), I spent a weekend in a parking lot doing nothing but clipping out, stopping, and clipping back in.

You also need to relax. You tend to overthink things--by your own admission--so while you're practicing, try to keep your body loose and breathe deeply.

Catrin
06-05-2011, 10:17 AM
Your process sounds fine; you just gotta do it more. When I first got my Keos (I already had been using SPDs), I spent a weekend in a parking lot doing nothing but clipping out, stopping, and clipping back in.

You also need to relax. You tend to overthink things--by your own admission--so while you're practicing, try to keep your body loose and breathe deeply.

Yes, this :) Relaxing makes such a difference - freezing up makes us more awkward automatically. Glad to hear the process sounds right - this can be the interesting part when you ride solo most of the time as it is so easy to learn bad habits that are hard to break later. Muscle memory is important, and I think that is all that is going on - just adding an additional step to the mix.

Depending on my schedule I will take a riding session this week or, most likely, after the Clinic next weekend and go to a nice empty parking lot and do this. I've done it a little, but not very often. Just practiced a couple of times and took off on the road. Have done this twice but that wasn't apparently quite enough.

indysteel
06-05-2011, 10:28 AM
I tend to clip out well in adance of an anticipated stop. You might try that--if you're not already--as it will be one less thing to think about as you actually bring the.bike to a stop. Remembering to clip out in the first place is the most important thing. If you've got that down, then the rest is pretty easy.

Also, force yourself to stop at stop signs. Your first post made me wonder if you are. It'll help you work on restarting the bike, too. Plus, it's the law. :)

Good luck.

Catrin
06-05-2011, 10:36 AM
I tend to clip out well in advance of an anticipated stop. You might try that--if you're not already--as it will be one less thing to think about as you actually bring the.bike to a stop. Remembering to clip out in the first place is the most important thing. If you've got that down, then the rest is pretty easy.

Also, force yourself to stop at stop signs. Your first post made me wonder if you are. It'll help you work on restarting the bike, too. Plus, it's the law. :)

Good luck.

hmmmm, stop signs in the corn fields with nothing coming for miles around???? Would I break the law in such a fashion? :o Yeah, I need to get better at this - and while I am clipping out in advance of stopping, it is probably too close to the actual stop...

Reesha
06-05-2011, 11:12 AM
You know, I never really thought about how to clip in or out and come to a stop very much until I had to teach it to some teenagers who were utter spring chickens with the clipless pedals.

We did just what was recommended and went to a parking lot. I tend to clip out, start slowing and then sort of stand up and out over the top tube to put my foot down without wobbling over. Best practiced at low speeds :D One girl totally psyched herself out and rammed me in the backside while I was stopped in front of her. Nothing like the nose of a saddle stabbing your fanny! :D

Catrin
06-05-2011, 11:25 AM
I tend to clip out, start slowing and then sort of stand up and out over the top tube to put my foot down without wobbling over. Best practiced at low speeds :D One girl totally psyched herself out and rammed me in the backside while I was stopped in front of her. Nothing like the nose of a saddle stabbing your fanny! :D

Eeek!

Bingo!

I think last year I had figured out how to stand up and out over the TT to put my foot down while stopping, but forgot how to do that when I had to return to BMX pedals due to my injuries last fall. I need to remind my body how to do that... Currently I think I am too close to a seated position when I start to stop.

I suspect that the mountain bike clinic this weekend will be quite helpful in this department. For us newest of the new we will start with how to start and stop the bike - both in panic and non-panic situations. It will be good for me, even though I will be using BMX pedals and shin guards.

westtexas
06-05-2011, 01:32 PM
When I come to a stop, I clip out on the left (my right leg is stronger so that's the one that's always clipped in) and let it just dangle off the side of the bike as I start applying the brakes. Then I put weight on the right foot and bring myself off the saddle fully supported on the right leg as I drop to the ground and put the left foot down. Then I just crank my right leg back up and when it's time to go again it's already in the right position to give a good push on the pedals and give me some coasting time to clip in on the left.

In emergency situations I'm terrible. I rode Ft. Davis last weekend (a very serious hill climb for 11 miles) and at one point at a hill base I was so tired and wanted to rest, but my legs could not clip out. End result was a simply fell over onto my side at a standstill. My pride was hurt more than my body.

ny biker
06-05-2011, 07:03 PM
Once you're clipped out, it's no different from stopping with regular pedals.

Honestly, I can't even tell you how I do it. I've never thought about it. Foot goes down on pavement. That's it. All other movements just happen naturally in order for the foot to go down.

Just remember your balance is better while you're seated.

Catrin
06-06-2011, 04:19 PM
Of course there wasn't any problems on my ride tonight - and I made myself stop a couple of times "just because". My mind was on other things so I wasn't over-thinking things and no problem - and no falls ;)

MollyJ
06-09-2011, 07:59 AM
I have a clipping question. It is always easier for me to clip out on my right side. I often keep my left food clipped for the whole ride. It is also easier for me to clip out when my pedal is at the top of cycle.

Is that typical? I read above where the person in traffic unclips the left food so that you will not fall into traffice. That makes a great deal of sense. Likewise, when I do u-turns, I've unclipped on the left in case I over balanced it seems like you would over balance with the forces of your u-turn which is typically left but I do that less now since I have more confidence.

Thanks in advance.

Owlie
06-09-2011, 08:10 AM
I clip out with my right foot. And once you've got clipless down, you're not likely to fall into traffic. And I think you're supposed to unclip with the pedal at 12:00 for balance. Regardless, if it works for you, why change it?

And in regard to your u-turn question...again, if it works for you, why change it? If your bike control is decent, you're not likely to overbalance, but then again, I'm not one to try u-turns on a relatively narrow piece of road or trail.:o

Catrin
06-09-2011, 08:39 AM
I think the best approach is whatever works for YOU. Granted, I am new to clipping in, and I have to switch feet at stops because I start AND stop with my right foot - I've had foot surgery and prefer to use my physically stronger foot for both activities. It works for me.

I don't try u-turns unless I have enough room that I am comfortable doing so :o

AZchick
06-09-2011, 12:23 PM
OK, regarding the whole foot thing... what if you are used to your left foot down on the pavement at stops with the old platform pedals, but you feel you can clip in easier with your right foot (my left pronates and doesn't like to clip in fast) Is it going to mess up my balance switching to putting my right foot down??? Should I just give it a try? I've been clipless for ONE day. :)

Owlie
06-09-2011, 12:32 PM
AZchick, I used to do that too. I have some range-of-motion issues with my left ankle that make clipping out on the right easier, but with the platforms, I'd use whichever foot felt more convenient.

Here's my suggestion: Take your clipless pedals off your bike and put your platforms back on. Make a conscious effort during your next few rides to stop consistently with your right foot down. It didn't screw up my balance at all, though I had one or two close calls. When it becomes second nature, then put your pedals back on.

The other thing you can do is to put one bike shoe on (on the foot you clip out with) and put a regular shoe (whatever you've been riding in) on the other. That way you get used to the action of clipping out, but you can catch yourself if you lean the wrong way.

AZchick
06-09-2011, 04:28 PM
I've got my bike on a trainer right now... maybe I could practice the right foot down on there for awhile. Then I'll go outside to the front lawn.. where my landings will be nice and soft :)

AZchick
06-09-2011, 04:37 PM
I could also practice on my MTB which has bmx pedals. Can you tell I don't want to fool around with the speedplays??

Owlie
06-09-2011, 04:54 PM
Hehe, I'd say practice on the mountain bike for getting your brain trained to put your right foot down. By all means practice clipping in and out on the trainer, though.

AZchick
06-10-2011, 03:43 PM
So about my stopping foot retraining plan... I took my MTB out for an hour today and my brain is way too trained to lean left. So I guess I will keep working on my quirky left foot clipping in. Thanks for the encouragement Owlie!