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tribogota
09-01-2010, 07:16 PM
what's it like to try and learn rock climbing at 40, is the curve too much, or do I have a chance of being competent (without having to become a fanatic)?

Zen
09-01-2010, 08:17 PM
Do you have reasonable flexibility and upper body strength?
You can do it. I used to love rock climbing and will still do an artificial wall.

lph
09-01-2010, 10:54 PM
It's no problem at all. In rock climbing a certain amount of strength (actually power to weight ratio, you don't have to be that strong if you're light and unless you want to tackle overhangs), coordination and especially foresight and good planning are more important than fast reflexes or good cardio condition. Lots of "older" (and I use that term very loosely!) people rock climb, even though they're not ripping through the roofs with bulging forearms like the young whips. Patience and calm will get you a long way, especially if you're on lead.

rocknrollgirl
09-03-2010, 04:39 AM
I think like in any sport it depends on your goal. Competent indoors? Outdoors? Do you want to lead climb?

Climbing was my primary sport up until a few years ago. I got a late start to the sport, and the only caution that I would give, is that is is very hard on your tendons and joints.

If you climb recreationally and go once in a while you will be fine. We were pretty hard core, and I always had sore hands, wrists and eventually developed a shoulder problem.

I think that with climbing in order to be safe and "competent", you need to be slightly fanatical, because you have to keep you climbing head in the game.

If you climb indoors this would be less of an issue. It is great fun, and a good workout. If we had a gym closer, I would still do that part of the sport. Sore hands and all! I sure miss it.

As you can see....I miss this terrible, and have lots to say...feel free to shoot me a pm if you want to chat more....

Ruth

Zen
09-03-2010, 08:52 AM
I think like in any sport it depends on your goal. Competent indoors? Outdoors? Do you want to lead climb?



what's it like to try and learn rock climbing at 40, is the curve too much, or do I have a chance of being competent (without having to become a fanatic)?

Girl just wants to have fun

HillSlugger
09-03-2010, 06:51 PM
I think I was 39 when I started climbing. I climbed passionately for several years and quit when biking and triathlon took over my life.

Take lessons so that you learn good technique right from the start.

solobiker
09-03-2010, 06:58 PM
You don't need to have a lot of upper body strength as climbing takes pretty good foot work. Initally you will get "pumped" in the forearms and you may not be able to do too many laps on a wall but that will improve in a few weeks.

In my climbing days I could lead climb 5 10 overhangs by walking my feet up and using different techniques to decreasee strain on the arm muscles. My DH on the other hand has a lot of upper body strength and is quite skinny ( I am not) and r could reach ( positive ape index) and power his way through cruxs. It is better to have a flowing technique vs powering because it saves energy, better balance and looks better:p

What type of climnbing are you thinking? Sport or Trad? Inside or outside? DH and I did mainly high alpine trad. We did sport in the winter months for training.

So I guess my longwinded response would be I don't think it is too late. If you are planning on climbing outside please take self-rescue classes. I can explain more if you would like. There have been way too many accidents lately.

Kimmyt
09-07-2010, 07:51 AM
I have climbed with many women who learned to climb in their forties or fifties and could rip it up. Essentially, climbing is like other sports- you get out of it what you put in.

If you go into a situation saying it's not worth it unless you can perform at a certain level (whatever level you ascertain as good enough), then you are setting yourself up for frustration. Just go out, try it, and if you like it do it more.

K.

tribogota
09-08-2010, 04:14 PM
thanks for all the advice, I don't know what type of climbing, hadn't gotten that far yet, trying to power DOWN on triathlon and do something slightly different and hopefully LESS time consuming, thus the not becoming a fanatic, but alas, my tri personality will probably kick into gear. Hope to start next month when femur and collarbone TOTALLY healed from cycling.

Spinner
06-27-2011, 08:58 AM
That'll be very (http://valueslim.com) hard but if you belief in yourself you can do it. But you have to train hard :)

roadie gal
06-27-2011, 03:24 PM
Climbing becomes addictive. It's easy to become a fanatic. "I KNOW I can do that wall/pitch/etc. I just have to try harder."

Unlike biking or running, climbing is not a sport that is generally done alone. Do you have someone that is going to learn with you or who climbs already?