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Zen
06-22-2009, 01:31 PM
Anyone have any thoughts or experience with them? I don't want to spend money on a roof rack and can't see myself putting a kayak on one by myself.

I'm also considering price. I don't see myself using this for much other than putzing around on the Monocacy

Zen
06-22-2009, 01:52 PM
Then there's this (http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/mld/spo/1228380407.html)
or this (http://baltimore.craigslist.org/spo/1191344629.html)
Which kind would I need for the Monocacy (or Blackwater?)

Cataboo
06-22-2009, 02:23 PM
Both are whitewater boats - which I don't think you'd want at blackwater. You could use a whitewater boat on the monocacy & you'd probably be okay because there's a bit of a current. The latter boat (prijon one) would be more suited as a river runner, so it might be okay on the monocacy, but they're asking an awful lot for what I think is an old boat.

I've got my whitewater boat & my touring kayak up here, so we could try 'em both on the monocacy if you want some evening this week (providing it's not too flooded) - I'm debating selling the whitewater boat, so brought it over here to try to see how frustrating it would be or not as a boat to use around here. We can switch back & forth on boats - one of us'll be frustrated, I think.

I had some friends with inflatable kayaks that were orange & they bought them at REI & they loved them. We did paddle with 'em once on some river in delaware that emptied out into the beach/ocean... They were all fine paddling on the river, but got seat sick in the waves when we got out into the ocean, so they went back in.

Other boats to look into - the foldable boats, they can be expensive, but there's a website on how to make your own if you're feeling creative - I could help you with some of it 'cause I've been meaning to make one one of these days.

Kalidurga
06-22-2009, 03:31 PM
My dad's got an inflatable (never used) that he's thinking of selling, if you want to pay for shipping from Florida. I'll have to see if I can get his Craiglist link.

Zen
06-22-2009, 03:35 PM
Or I could wait for you to visit him :D



Other boats to look into - the foldable boats, they can be expensive, but there's a website on how to make your own if you're feeling creative - I could help you with some of it 'cause I've been meaning to make one one of these days.
Is there duct tape involved? I'm envisioning all sorts of monstrosities there:eek:

Kalidurga
06-22-2009, 03:48 PM
You'd be waiting until September, when they come up here for Labor Day.

I think this is it: Inflatable Kayak - Stearns - $220 (Punta Gorda) (http://fortmyers.craigslist.org/spo/1215005069.html)

Cataboo
06-22-2009, 06:15 PM
Here's an inflatable on craigslist:
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/spo/1227708900.html

making boats:
http://yostwerks.com/

No duct tape involved unless you wanna... Somewhere there's this pretty hilarious link about a math graduate student who was building his own foldable boat and after building his frame, was super excited & wanted to try it out before getting the skin put on it - so he wrapped the frame with saran wrap & went off to the river to try the boat out.

Cataboo
06-22-2009, 06:22 PM
how long is the mothership? Can you fold down the seats? Julie manages to stick that sit on top of hers into her husband's honda element - folds down the passenger side seats and it just slides in. I think that kayak is like 10-12 foot long or something, I took her over to appotomatox river company (paddleva.com) once & she picked it 'cause it fit in that car... I don't think it was more than like $300-400 new. Appotomatox river company sometimes has great prices on boats, although it's a haul getting down there from up here.

Zen
06-22-2009, 08:08 PM
I could stick it out the sunroof.

lph
06-23-2009, 12:06 AM
I don't know anything about inflatable kayaks, but I just wanted to say that I found a technique for sliding my kayak onto a roof rack that is very easy. As long as you can lift one end of a kayak you can do it, unless you have a very tall car maybe.

Zen
06-23-2009, 09:15 AM
Well, the roof rack would also be another added expense:(
A good paddle costs almost as much as a kayak!

Cataboo
06-23-2009, 09:44 AM
roof racks are things you can sometimes get cheaper on criagslist if you know the parts you need...

paddles, steepandcheap has had some carlisle ones lately that aren't bad... otherwise, bending branches makes some nice inexpensive paddles. Unfortunately I've sold all my spare paddles that I'm allowed to, or julie inherited them. You used to be able to get bending branches infusion dream paddles, which were a plastic paddle with a crank shaft that weighed about 37 ounces - good paddle in that you never had to worry about the blades ( my carbon fiber paddle blades - I cry when they scratch) especially in rocky areas. I still have one of the unfusion dreams, but unfortunately the bf likes that paddle a lot.

Check out the CPA kayaker forums to see if anyone's selling anything cheap (cheasapeake paddlers association)


I've gotten my last couple paddles off ebay "relatively" cheaply.

Cataboo
06-23-2009, 10:13 AM
Well, the roof rack would also be another added expense:(
A good paddle costs almost as much as a kayak!

You know... if you started skiing in addition to the kayaking, then you could join me in the full range of the most expensive hobbies on earth without having the income to match...

Between cycling, kayaking, photography, computers for photos & the internet, skiing, lightweight camping/backpacking gear and the rest of that.... It gets mighty expensive.

Of course, other people somehow just ride their 20 year old bike and never upgrade anything and are fine.

add in kite surfing, kites are freaking expensive too. luckily i can talk the bf into buying those for himself & just use his.

7rider
06-23-2009, 10:54 AM
You know... if you started skiing in addition to the kayaking, then you could join me in the full range of the most expensive hobbies on earth without having the income to match...

Between cycling, kayaking, photography, computers for photos & the internet, skiing, lightweight camping/backpacking gear and the rest of that.... It gets mighty expensive.

Ain't that the truth.
But she'd have to ad scuba diving to the list to really induce an economic coronary.

Zen
06-23-2009, 10:54 AM
These knees can stand just so much. I only joined the ski club for the parties:p

Cataboo
06-23-2009, 10:55 AM
ha. I haven't gotten there yet - I have a friend down in florida that offers to certify me if I go down..
but the last thing I need is another expensive hobby that i need to fly to

emily_in_nc
06-23-2009, 05:35 PM
I would also be interested in feedback on inflatable kayaks. We just sold our very nice (but loooong) touring kayaks because they were too big to take on our 30' sailboat, and we're just spending way more time on that than we were paddling in the past 2 years. We're considering a tandem inflatable kayak eventually as we do love paddling.

We sold our kayaks and Thule hull-a-ports on craigslist and have our Yakima roof rack listed now.

Cataboo
06-24-2009, 07:53 AM
Maybe you should think about something like this:

http://www.oceankayak.com/kayaks/single_kayaks/yak_board.html


It'll fit into your van, be fine for the monocacy or around cambridge - you won't be a speed demon on it, but I don't think you'll be one anyways :)

REi's got it on a bit of a sale, not sure it'll be there in october when you're ready to buy... benefit of rei is that if you try it out & don't like it... you can return it. free shipping if you pick it up in store.
http://www.rei.com/outlet/product/793958

Zen
06-24-2009, 05:19 PM
There's no photo of the second one but it sounds like it looks like the first one.
So that's what you mean by 'sit on top'.

It just doesn't seem right to me. But I can't dismiss something i know nothing about.

ETA-
I think I just dismissed it. There's no seat back to lean against.

emily_in_nc
06-24-2009, 05:34 PM
Sit on tops are fun (we used them on vacation in the Keys and BVI), but they are definitely for bathing suit paddling and warm water only -- you are basically sitting in water the entire time. Not a lot of water, but they aren't like kayaks that you actually sit inside on a seat and have some reasonable hope of staying dry.

Cataboo
06-24-2009, 06:01 PM
There's no photo of the second one but it sounds like it looks like the first one.
So that's what you mean by 'sit on top'.

It just doesn't seem right to me. But I can't dismiss something i know nothing about.

ETA-
I think I just dismissed it. There's no seat back to lean against.

Oh, you buy seats for them. But it makes 'em a thin flat boat that slides into your van.

Julie sticks her yoga mat or something in hers and sits on top of that and stays dry. Probably wouldn't in waves

Zen
06-24-2009, 07:15 PM
But it has no back to lean against!
How can I relax in a cove and eat pie without a seat back?

Tuckervill
06-24-2009, 07:23 PM
Yes, it does have a back. It's like a bucket seat that you buy, and the seat is attached via straps and adjustable for your comfort. :)

Karen

Cataboo
06-24-2009, 07:30 PM
My seat back in my touring kayak is adjusted by straps also for my comfort.

Here's the link to the seat options:
http://oceankayak.stores.yahoo.net/backrests.html

I'm sure there's 3rd party options.

And just 'cause I like this pic, here's Julie in her sit on top, she's dry, has a seat back & her yoga mat thingie and she was doing better in the narrow little channels we were going through than I was in my 16 foot long boat:

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_WfCe0A3iU1c/Sj3DyCmLGQI/AAAAAAAABNQ/GATvkwbLhhY/s640/IMGP4879.JPG

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_WfCe0A3iU1c/Sj3E-83N-QI/AAAAAAAABOw/1JQj47SAn6s/s640/IMGP4957.JPG


She did pick the boat 'cause it fit into her honda element without any problems, she can maneuver it on her own, and it does what she wants - enjoy a day on the water & watch the wildlife, etc.

Zen
06-24-2009, 07:43 PM
This is starting to remind me of cycling.

C'mere little girl. This kayak is only $225.00.
You like it don't you?
What's that? A seat? A paddle?
BwaHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Cataboo
06-24-2009, 08:45 PM
*cough*

If you want to start touring with your kayak like you do with your bike...

That's a whole different story & price range.

And then I would tell you getting a sit on top is ridiculous and it's why I don't have one despite recognizing that they're damned convenient for lazing on the river with.

Speaking of which, I gotta go find all my camping gear so I can shove it into the kayak this weekend.

tulip
06-25-2009, 05:12 AM
I've seen some quite nice folding kayaks that are not inflatable.

The cost of the kayak is just the beginning. Then there's the paddle, PFD, safety gear, roof rack...this is why I don't yet have a kayak (that and my really nice but overbudget kitchen).

Cataboo
06-25-2009, 06:19 AM
I started off buying cheap accessories, a good boat, and then upgrade my accessories over time (not to mention the boat) Sierratradingpost has sales, backcountryoutlet, outdoorplay.com, nrsweb, moosejaw, reioutlet, EMS, hudson trail outfitters, as well.. As I've upgraded accessories they've either been inherited by other friends getting into kayaking, or I keep them around for people to borrow if they're going kayaking with me.

You don't have to get a roof rack to begin with - you can get foam block carriers that will cradle the kayak on your roof. those are $30-40 and they work. The straps that come with are also useful for when you do have a roof rack.
http://www.prolineracks.com/riverside-kayak-canoe-foam-blocks.html

It is possible to paddle with a cheap paddle - It also reinforces some good paddling techniques... You shouldn't be muscling your paddle through the water, it's not good technique, it's tiring, and it increases the risk of joint (shoulder) issues - so having a floppy plastic blade that is going to give way if you try to muscle it is actually good training. A powerful paddle blade (fiberglass or carbon fiber) that won't give way and will allow you to continue to muscle isn't a good thing when you're beginning because it allows you to get away with poor paddling techniques. It also gives you some time to figure out paddle fit, shape & exactly what type of kayaker are you - are you a high angle kayaker, are you a low angle kayaker? Exactly what shape blade works for you, and how long do you want your paddle? It's similar to bike fit. I've been through several paddles, and have my current "favorites"

A pfd - This is not something you want to cheap out on, but usually I can get those on sale for about $40-50.

Other safety things... If you don't have a sit on top and you have a boat that doesn't have bulkheads - you want float bags in there to keep the boat bouyant. Those I see on sale pretty regularly. REIoutlet or moosejaw pretty regularly has a bilge pump/sponge/safety leash/paddle float kit for about $40.


I once bought a boaters emergency kit at Marshalls of all places for $20 - it was mostly oriented for power boaters, but it did have emergency blankets, a waterproof flashlight, a throw rope bag, first aid kit, etc. and I still use pieces of that kit now.

Certain things can be made cheaply for kayaking - you can buy a throw bag/rope - or you can get some nylon rope and make your own. You can buy a paddle leash - or you can just go get lengths of cord or elastic and make your own.

Dedicated clothing is really not necessary unless you're planning on going out in cold water. A good hat is a necessity I think.

TrekTheKaty
07-26-2009, 12:54 PM
My DH bought me a kayak last year that was collecting dust, because I didn't have wheels or a rack--have to borrow DH's truck and strap it into the bed. However, on vacation I discovered my sister-in-law has two qayak inflatables (www.qayak.com). I never thought thought they would be sturdy, but they used to own a sailboat and did a lot of research before they purchased them. We deflated them to get them in the SUV with the bikes, but left them inflated and tied them on the roof rack for the ride home.

I hadn't bought myself the kayak yet, because I saw the rack, paddle, PDF's, etc were going to be expensive. Luckily, a friend donated the paddle. I also wasn't sure I could handle the kayak on my own. I just purchased wheels and they make a huge difference--worth every penny. However, DH is now interested in buying a second kayak! Having a buddy would make loading easier, but I have no idea where we'd store them both :cool:

LPH--what's your technique? I want a roof rack, but I'm pretty sure I couldn't get it up there by myself?!

lph
10-15-2009, 03:37 AM
LPH--what's your technique? I want a roof rack, but I'm pretty sure I couldn't get it up there by myself?!

sorry! Didn't see this before now.

Basically I lift one end up first on to the rear supports, then slide the kayak up and over. This was such a great trick to learn so I'll specify it fully here:

I have a standard Thule kayak carrier (874, w/4 rubber supports), on the roof rack of a Toyota Carina sedan. I place a folded wool blanket (a towel or small mat would be even better, but we have blankets in the car) over the rear supports, and another one over the trunk. Nothing covering the rear window, but with a different type of car you might need something there.

I then lift the kayak onto the rear end of the car from behind, so that the rudder end rests on or over the wool-covered rear supports, and the middle of the kayak rests on the wool-covered trunk. My kayak is quite flat-bottomed in the middle, so it's quite stable in this position. The bow of the kayak either rests on the ground, or I'm holding it, depending on whether I've lifted the kayak from my shoulder or from the ground.

Then I just push to slide the kayak up and over, until it's in place. Push the rear end down to slide the kayak forward. Wiggle the mat or blanket out from under the rear supports, strap and go.

This is in fact easier for me to do than lift the kayak up with the help of another person! And it gives me perfect freedom to go anywhere alone.

With a more v-shaped kayak the whole procedure would be more wobbly, but I should think still doable. Thule does make a carrier with felt-covered rear supports, but they are flat rather than curved, and to my mind do not support the kayak very well. Especially when driving alone I need the peace of mind that my kayak is secured as well as possible.

Oh, and I have a Prijon Catalina in HTP plastic, it's 4,64 m (just over 15 ft) long and weighs 24 kg (~53 lbs). I'm fairly strong, but not especially tall, 5 ft 5. With a glassfibre kayak I might want to have a mat of some sort under the bow as well, since it tends to get ground into the dirt a bit while lifting.

tulip
10-15-2009, 05:50 AM
If you have an SUV, you should really consider a Thule Hullavator (http://www.thuleracks.com/featured_product_hullavator.asp) rack. Spendy, yes, but alot cheaper than throwing out your back. I can't justify it because I have a small car (VW Rabbit), but I've seen one in action and it is very, very nifty.

Cataboo
10-15-2009, 06:03 AM
To get the boat up, I have this:
http://www.fasttrackracks.com/p-227-yakima-hully-roller-rooftop-boat-rollers.aspx

The yakima hully rollers on the back, the mako saddles on the front.

I've also got the yakima boat loader:
http://www.yakima.com/racks/kayak-rack/product/8004018/boatloader.aspx

So I just lift the end of the boat or put the end of the boat on the boat loader arm which sticks out from my roof rack, then slide the boat up the armon to the front saddles, then I can use the rollers to push the boat forward or back to where I want it...

I've got a 2nd set of saddles/rollers the next side over, so I can just leverage the boat & put it over on the 2nd set...

I also have an easier time of getting the boat on my roof than having an inexperienced person helping me - if I've got another person, we do just sorta lift the boat onto the car, one holding the front and one holding the back.

I've done the use a blanket thing when I first got a kayak, but if you have sand or grit on the bottom fo your boat and it's on your car (I kinda typically have a layer of sand on my roof in the summer), you don't want to slide anything along the roof...

The rollers have a lock so they don't move when you don't want them to, and I tie down the boat pretty securely - I've gone 80 mph for like 13 hours with my boats on my roof without any problems.

I'm 5'1, the car is a subaru outback so it's fairly high for me, but not SUV high.

Boats range from 16-18 feet long, prob 42-60 lbs. I don't have a problem carrying them.