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Jenc
10-31-2004, 07:12 AM
I am in need of losing a minimum of about 20 lbs and a maximum of about 50 lbs. What advice does anyone have to accomplish that goal, yet still get the right nutrition to ride anywhere from 30-100 miles per week, plus workouts at gym, occasional runnning?? I just don't know how much to eat, what to eat, etc...Any advice is MUCH appreciated!

snapdragen
10-31-2004, 12:00 PM
I think one of the best plans out there is Weight Watchers. You learn portion control, nutrition, and you don't starve. They take into account that if you are active, you have to eat more to fuel your body.

Surlygirl
10-31-2004, 04:21 PM
I like ediets.com You can choose your plan and modify your meals to suit your tastes. If you like to cook it gives you the recipes for the meals or you can pick store bought meals such as lean cuisine, or you can do a combo of both. There is lots of on-line support and help. It costs 10.00 a month I think which is competitive with other weight loss programs.

Trek420
10-31-2004, 04:43 PM
not exactly a diet but has anyone read Chris Charmicael's new book about food and training? ...i forget the title. Also not sure how applicable it is to women athletes. :rolleyes:

slinkedog
10-31-2004, 05:34 PM
Jenc, I recently (over about 5 months) lost about 20 pounds. It was over the winter months, so I wasn't exercising much, but I found that if I just ate slower and ate a little less, I had a lot of success. Figuring out what a real portion is is key. I was eating twice as much, sometimes, as a "portion" is at many meals. Just by eating slower I realized that I was full much sooner.

As far as eating for training, I'm not sure. I'm sure there are some good resources out there! Good luck!

Jenc
11-01-2004, 02:43 AM
You guys have given me some good ways to get started. Who ever knew that I would want to drop weight so that my cycling performance would be better? I am so glad that I found the sport. I truly adore it, and everyone thinks I am obsessed. :) Thanks guys!
Oh, in two weeks, I am doing a 50K ride for the American Diabetes Association. I will let you guys know how I do. Any pointers?

Sonerila
01-15-2005, 02:31 PM
Hi, I'm new here, but am having fun reading all your posts. My opinion is that you can diet until the cows come home, but when you tire of the latest fad, and you will, you'll go back to your original weight. That's so depressing. Also, some of those diets can be extremely expensive. Don't diet. You have to change your lifestyle. Obviously increase your exercise in order to burn more calories than you take in, but the key is to drop all sugar and anything made with white flour, don't eat anything battered or fried, increase your fruit and vegetable intake and drink at least 8 glasses of water a day. Prepare simple, non-processed foods. I know changing your old habits sounds rough, but after a while, you'll start seeing that flour, sugar and fried foods are the enemy, and you won't be drawn to them. But, you can have a once-in-awhile treat and it will be more enjoyable than when you took it for granted. You'll also be doing your body a great service because you'll be getting healthier. I eat like this and I honestly don't go to bed crying. I'm never hungry. You might find some new foods that you love. You might try a "Yogurt Surprise" for breakfast, or a treat. Just fill an elegant looking glass (wine, champagne, etc.) with low-fat yogurt (Greek yogurt from Trader Joe's is yummy), then place berries or any fruit on top of that and a low-fat granola on top. Found that recipe at a restaurant in Monterey, CA and have been making it ever since. Just make sure the ingredients are low-fat.

Good luck!
Sonerila

jobob
01-15-2005, 05:07 PM
but after a while, you'll start seeing that flour, sugar and fried foods are the enemy, and you won't be drawn to them. Oh dear. That's not going to happen for me anytime soon I'm afraid.

But I just returned from a 58 mile ride so that should be good for an In 'N Out burger, double-double, with well-done fries. :D

- jobob, who dropped about 20 lbs on Weight Watchers and kept it off thanks to biking (and, the better eating habits I acquired from WW - but give up entirely on junk food? nah).
Oh, and getting braces. I have to chew so slowly now I actually get *bored* of eating. hoodathunk.

Veronica
01-15-2005, 05:44 PM
Did you have good weather your way today? Antioch has been gray for forever it seems. Even though I know it was sunny on Wed.

V.

jobob
01-15-2005, 06:16 PM
It was a great day, finally! A bit on the chilly side and it was overcast more often than not, but since it's the first weekend day w/o rain we've had for some time now, I'm not complaining!

We went from our home in Union City out to Alum Rock Park in San Jose and back - that's one of our favorite rides, and after all that rain the hills along the way were that wonderful springtime emerald green (appologies to the listmembers currently under a couple of feet of snow :( )

I developed a cramp in my calf about a third of the way into the ride that subsided after I consumed mass quantities of Cytomax, but then it re-emerged and started moving around to other parts of my leg :p I've never cramped before so this was a new experience. Best I could guess, my legs were colder than I realized, although luckily only one leg cramped, so blessings were counted. It was more-or-less OK while I kept moving, but after going down a long hill or stopping at a stoplight, once I resumed pedalling I could really feel it. I tried to keep spinning while I was going downhill but that was only marginally helpful. I was wearing my lycra sport pants over my shorts - the pants have close fitting legs but they're not tights. I think I need to get me some legwarmers. Apart from the leg cramp, which was more uncomfortable than actually painful, it was a grand day out.

- Jo.

Veronica
01-15-2005, 07:06 PM
Bummer about the cramp. But kudos to you for riding. We lounged around the house. Tomorrow is supposed to be warmer, so we're hoping to mountain bike. I have Monday off and the weather looks good for now so I'm planning a long road ride.

V.

doc
01-16-2005, 09:34 AM
JenC
Weight watchers is a great way to go. I lost 20 lbs 2 years ago and haven't gained any back yet. They teach you better eating habits and healthier food choices. So it really incorporates what others said here. You'll find that you will stay away from fried, and sugar, and white flour... You'll find you increase your vegies and fruits and cut your portion size. That's their whole point. You re-learn what healthy eating is.

Good luck. I know you can do it!

han-grrl
01-16-2005, 05:06 PM
Hey There

I agree on NOT thinking about losing weight as dieting. think of it as changing your habits:

stock the cupboards with healthy snacks: dried fruits, nutes, homemade granola, etc etc...
if you don't BUY junk food, you won't eat it at home
watch for eating out of boredom. this is something i noticed with myself, especially when i am watching tv. getting up and going to the kitchen...just to browse of course ;). i catch myself now, and stop myself from taking anything.
drink more water
watch for the sugar content of foods. it is CRAZY how many products out there has EXTRA sugar in it: tomato sauce, PEAS, ketchup...there are many low sugar options (and i am not talking about the fake sugar stuff, just products using natural sweeteners like concentrated fruit juices and the like)...start looking for those...
start thinking about eating EFFECTIVELY. we are so focused on low this, and calories, that we've forgotten about NUTRIENTS. the food pyramid is a nice guideline to follow to make sure you are getting all your needed vitamins. remember, your body know but ONE THING, protect the inside. if you are missing nutrients, your body will pack on the fat to protect your organs.

anyway , just a few of my cents...:)

have a great day!

Han

Sonerila
01-16-2005, 06:58 PM
Well said, Han!

Irulan
01-16-2005, 07:14 PM
quote:but after a while, you'll start seeing that flour, sugar and fried foods are the enemy, and you won't be drawn to them.


Oh dear. That's not going to happen for me anytime soon I'm afraid.

It's a state of mind.
You can choose to think differently. Or rather, you can train yourself to choose differently. First you decide to quit eating it, for about a week, then when your body stops craving it,( after about a week) you don't want it anymore. Sugar is this way, heavy fats are this way, poor quality carbs are this way. I rarely eat any of that stuff anymore. It's been so long that when I do eat fried or super sweet, it just tastes nasty to me, my body almost rejects it.

I do allow myself real dessert on special occasion, but sweets as an everyday thing? No thank you.

Irulan

DirtDiva
01-16-2005, 11:16 PM
Do watch if you are buying low-fat things that they haven't compensated for removing the fat by adding more sugar, which isn't really any better for you in the end. (Salad dressings would be a typical example of this.)


Originally posted by han-grrl
it is CRAZY how many products out there has EXTRA sugar in it: tomato sauce, PEAS, ketchup...
Peas? The little, round, green, vegetable things? You can buy peas with sugar added? :eek: Dude, that is freaky and wrong.

- tlkiwi, whose peas contain, well, peas (and a little ice, if they haven't been cooked yet).

sarahfixit
01-17-2005, 06:15 AM
Maybe its just college-level metabolism, but I find pizza in moderation and a bowl of cereal and milk in the morning to work great. My freshmen year I went up like 20 lbs(after not changing in like 7yrs) and traced it to lack of fruits and vitamins. I added those, mainly oranges and pineapple, and it was almost night and day.
The previous mention about the body protecting itself is so true. When you think you are taking in less by eating 2 meals(as I was at the time, skip breakfasts) you process it slower and effectively keep more. The best advice I got was to eat small bits like half meals a few times throughout the day. The positive of that is there is never a true 'knawing and the cubicle' feeling.

nuthatch
01-17-2005, 02:22 PM
I absolutely second Sonerila's suggestions. I lost 50 pounds this way over about a year (no refined flour or sugar-sweetened stuff and more nuts, fruits, honey, vegetables, brown rice, whole wheat, oatmeal). It almost seems like it takes your body more calories to digest this stuff so you're not getting hungry as you switch over.

If you had suggested this to me about three years ago I would have said, "No way, life's too short to deprive myself" but I feel so much better, and it's so easy to follow. Add that type of diet to cycling and I think you'll see good results. Heck, I'm almost not afraid of lycra now! :D

shewhobikes
01-18-2005, 07:12 PM
I'm not necessarily recommending his approach (pretty radical!) but for pure motivation, read "Heft on Wheels." I think it's subtitled "A Field Guide to Doing a 180." Mike Magnuson, the author, always wanted to be competitive on his bike, but had gotten way overweight, smoked a pack a day and drank way too much. He stopped all that and biked like a fiend. Just look at the front and back cover for the before and after.

If you're interested in losing weight/changing your lifestyle/cycling, you'll love this book. A fun read. Good luck to you!

Sonerila
01-18-2005, 09:21 PM
I went to Amazon.com and looked at the front and back covers of this book, showing the author's before and after pics. Couldn't believe it was the same guy. What an inspiration!

Sonerila

SadieKate
01-19-2005, 09:54 AM
I second all the suggestions about upping the fiber content, lowering the fat and sugar of your diet. I eat tons of vegetables. For cereal, I eat multi-grain cut cereal (not rolled) with added nuts and dried fruit. It lasts longer, has more fiber and protein, less sugar than processed cereals, and is far more satisfying for the texture. Like Irulan, now that I stay away from fried foods, my body almost violently rejects the fat. It is a real inspiration to stay away from it!

I found that the South Beach Diet was a help in retraining my mind how to approach eating. Phase 1 is a killer for cyclists, but I just carbo-loaded starting on Friday night through Sunday lunch to get me through the bigger rides on the weekend and then back to the stricter routine during the week. As you move towards Phase 3, you'll find that it exactly the diet everyone should be on. High fiber, lots of fruits and veggies, low fat protein, etc. When I crave a baked potato, I now turn to a sweet potato because it has a higher nutritive value and can be just as yummy. The bottom line is that I have been able to control my weight better (even through the holidays) and my blood sugar doesn't fly all around the place. And I haven't bonked since I started eating this way.

halfbit
03-05-2005, 10:15 PM
I think Irulan has the right idea. One problem I see with some of the weight programs is that you end up spending a lot of time thinking about what you can afford to eat. Like the saying goes, "Eat to live, don't live to eat". These days, I think the amount of crummy food out there is mindboggling. Personally, I am a salad freak, one of those people that sits down and eats a salad the size of your mixing bowl in the kitchen, with tons of dressing. But I never eat low-fat foods and hardly ever eat carbs like bread or fried foods. It works for me - I weight the same at 56 as I weighed in my teens. I don't eat out much, which helps, because at least for me, most restaurants serve about three times as much food as I can consume (unless it's a chef salad).

nuthatch
03-06-2005, 04:11 AM
I weight the same at 56 as I weighed in my teens.

WOW! That's amazing!

I'm wondering how many of you pick up some weight in the winter? I know we can't get outside as much (or at all) and I vowed that I'd stay at my summer weight after reading about other riders picking up winter weight (say, like Jan Ulrich :) )

But no matter how hard I ride each day on my trainer, those inside miles are just not doing the trick.. I'm eating the same diet but the weight is building up!!! :eek:

Is it a body thing responding to winter sunlight levels (like slower metabolism because I'm suppose to be hanging out in a cave and sleeping) or is it that trainer miles are not the same as outside miles with hills and all?

Does everyone else pick up this "winter 5"? (or ten or so....)

Dogmama
03-06-2005, 04:30 AM
Covert Bailey says that exercise outdoors burns more calories because you tend to work harder since it isn't so arduous. I spend a lot of my winter time lifting weights & spinning because the short days curtail my morning rides. I usually don't gain fat but do put on muscle. Muscle increases metabolism.

DeniseGoldberg
03-06-2005, 06:25 AM
Does everyone else pick up this "winter 5"? (or ten or so....)

I find it interesting that in a normal year I do tend to pick up the "winter 5" that Nuthatch refers to, but this year that didn't happen. I think keeping a steady weight this winter is tied to my change of routine relative to food - a focus on eating to support my activity levels. After my early season crash (http://denise2004crash.crazyguyonabike.com) and subsequent lower than normal biking levels, I was very careful to make sure that I was eating to support my current activity levels and not my normal lots of biking eating levels. I wasn't able to bike at all for 6 weeks, and when I started I was only able to ride (what I considered to be) short distances. I supplemented that with lots of walking. I'm not a (techical) race walker - but I do walk at a good clip. On days I wasn't able to ride, I tried to walk for an hour to an hour and a half. Of course that didn't work as well for me through the winter and cold weather. Normally I throw my bike on a trainer for the winter months, but for some reason this season boredom set in almost immediately - so I continued my walking regimen (outside, in the dark and cold, sometimes in the snow...) and I added using an elliptical trainer at the gym. And I continued to watch my diet, trying to keep a balance, and trying to stick with healthy food - even though I allowed myself the occasional ice cream and chocolate!

It's almost time to jump back into riding (from a weather standpoint, that is) - and I will be increasing my calorie intake to support my activity levels. I guess I'm going to have to try to keep my new (eating) habits in the off season next year too!

Barb
03-07-2005, 02:43 PM
shesh it's like trying to quit smoking. Keep quitting uptil you quit!!! Every time I diet, my metabolism slows down to conserve!!! It's really hard to rev up my metabolism. My sisters are going to weight watchers now, so I was thinking of joining them. My big concern is that I am also studying for a national exam. I wonder if that is just asking too much. I typically eat while I study, so I am really trying not to have things in the house. I may have to resort to the cut veggie route, for stress chewing! Anyway, I did WW 2 years ago without success. It seemed like I was focused SO MUCH on what I could eat that day. Dare I try again. Has anyone had this experience?

CorsairMac
03-07-2005, 03:12 PM
Barb: try chewing gum. I noticed I ate less while at work then home and I figured out, I chew gum at work. Now when I'm home and I get that "gee I'm home and can eat whatever I want", I got get some gum and water. Seems to help!

Barb
03-07-2005, 06:29 PM
Thanks, I'll give that a try.

snapdragen
03-07-2005, 06:59 PM
Anyway, I did WW 2 years ago without success. It seemed like I was focused SO MUCH on what I could eat that day. Dare I try again. Has anyone had this experience?

I know what you mean! The first time I did WW, my days seemed to revolve around when and what I could eat. This time, I'm taking it easy, if I only lose .4 a week, so be it. I've noticed many of the women in my meeting really obsess about what they can eat. I think doing that makes it harder to stay on the plan. If I mess up one day, I just start again the next.

WW has changed a bit from 2 years ago, they now have 2 different plans -- the " flex points" plan, where you get a minimum number each day (mines 22), plus 35 "flex" points, that you can use anytime within the week. (Saves my butt on "girls night out" :D ) The other is the "core" plan. I didn't look too closely at this in the beginning, but I'm thinking of giving it a try. I think it's a less strict low carb option. You still get your 35 flex points with the core plan.

LBTC
03-07-2005, 09:49 PM
I know nothing about weight watchers, but totally think the concept of flex points is the right thing to do! you should not and can not cut out all the things that could be fattening for you. if you do you are sure to succumb at some point. the trick is to eat your favourite extravagences in moderation....and choose the best bang for your buck....nutritionally speaking. I can easily resist many types of milk chocolate, yet I eat chocolate almost every day (and stay slim) I found a chocolate bar called Cloud Nine that's dark chocolate, made with cane sugar or something, not refined, no chemicals, just good chocolate. only bring with you a very small amount. eat it slowly. it does satisfy....I've heard there's an 80/20 rule. 80% of the time you need to eat as healthy as you possibly can. 20% of the time you can eat whatever you want. And the more healthy food you eat, the healthier your choices on the whatever you want will naturally become. Never, ever, give up and say, oh, well, I blew it and ate 3 cookies, I might as well eat the whole bag. eating a bit more, or eating the stuff you'd hoped not to, does not make you a failure. it's just a blip. it's like not making it over a log crossing you usually make. it's like not quite making your hill climb best time every time out. it happened, don't beat yourself up, get back on track.

I also have a theory that the counting calories / burning calories thing needs to balance out over about 2 1/2 days, not just one day. I think my body is still recovering from an intense workout a day or more after it happened, therefore, the balance of what I eat needs to be over a longer period of time...I don't actually count the calories, but, if I'm very active, I do increase how much I eat, and ensure that lots of it is protein. If I find for some reason that I can't be as active as normal (like having strep throat. blech) I reduce my overall intake and make the best food choices I can. soup, anyone?

I think I'd better go do something else. you guys are going to get soo tired of me!!

Namaste,
~T~

AutumnBreez
03-08-2005, 02:11 AM
I have found since I have cut soda at the end of last year, refined sugars, dairy products, white flour/bread and began an adventure with living foods (raw foods) I have more energy and have lost 12 pounds. Now I am adding in the cycling and expect to widdle down, maybe not so much the weight as the size of my body should slim down.
You don't have to eat as much of raw as you do cooked to feel full, the body does not have to work as hard in finding the enzymes, less stress more energy.
If you eat nuts or seeds, remember to soak them like you would beans, without heat (not blanching), before eating them. They have enzyme inhibitors that have to be tricked into being released so your body can digest them easier. I have seen so much success from my forum buddies without trying to lose, it happens anyway.
Doctors recommend this treatment to cancer patients, why wait till you get it?! My plan, to eat raw, fill my lungs with fresh country air, and cycle long. Yep, this is the life!

AutumnBreez
03-19-2005, 04:59 AM
Ok, I lost the weight but I am bringing in other foods because it is not enough of a boost for cycling.

jobob
03-19-2005, 06:23 AM
A strange thing has happened to me in the last few months. It seems like my metabolism has changed, or perhaps my stomach has shrunk, but I just don't seem to get hungry as much anymore, and when I do, I feel full after consuming less food than I used to. And I hardly ever snack between meals anymore.

Ever since I got braces (just on my lower teeth) I've had to chew verrry slowly and deliberately - I'm now officially the World's Slowest Eater :p - but I think eating so slowly has made a huge difference. That and the fact that some foods just don't seem to taste as good to me as they used to, particularly sweet things, which might be due to some foods interacting w. the metal to give them a slightly off taste. And I just don't seem to crave them anymore. Plus, every time I eat something between meals I'm faced with the prospect of getting the remnants out of my braces - I generally carry a little travel toothbrush with me, but just the thought of having to run off to brush my teeth makes me stop and think 'do I really want this?' , and more often than not I realize, eh, notsomuch. Either that or I'll opt for a yogurt, rather than a muffin or some cookies.

The offshoot is, since the beginning of the year I've dropped another 10 lbs without really trying :o , so I'm now at my "ultimate goal" weight of 140 - heck, I'm even within 5 lbs of the weight on my driver's license, which I haven't been in, um, over 20 years :rolleyes: .

And you should see my clothes, LOL! It seems those last 10 lbs made a big difference in my pants size, I had to go out and buy a few new pairs of pants & jeans (size 10 jeans & a pair of size 8 dress pants, woo woo - never thought I'd see that) because my 12's and 14's were just entirely too baggy (though my husband said they look very gangsta on me, heh). And I even had to buy new cycling shorts - L's became too L. :D

I still sometimes eat what a lot of people would consider junk, but Irulan, you're right, I really don't crave the junk food anymore, and even when I eat the junk, I eat much less of it. But I still won't refuse an In-N-Out burger if it's offered to me - I just might not eat the whole thing, or pass on the fries :D . And I still have 2 boxes of relatively untouched Girls Scout cookies in my office - once in a while I'll have one cookie, and that's it - that's so unlike me, LOL.

I just hope that once the braces come off (in theory before the end of the year) I won't go crazynutso and go back to my old eating habits :eek: but I don't think that will happen, I really like how I look nowadays.

Allie1DukeFn
08-16-2005, 02:53 PM
I actually went to a nutrionist to help me with weight loss. One of the best things she did was do the test to determine my resting metabolic rate. Basically how many calories my body will burn in a day if I do nothing but sit on my rear end. Mine was 1,700. So we came up with an eating plan that was between 1,200 and 1,400 a day. I've been consistently losing about a pound a week. Down 18 lbs, 7 more to go!

The other thing that really seems to have made a difference is eating ~something~ about every 2 hours. Even if it is just a sugar free jello. If you aren't constantly feeding your body - your body thinks it needs to conserve energy and goes into starvation mode and your metabolism doesn't burn any fat. If you are constantly giving yourself energy - your metabolism keeps chugging along.

We also found an AMAZING cookbook from the American Heart Association! It has these really great recipes that sound totally weird but somehow everything just turns out tasting really great! Like putting shredded zucchini into meatloaf! Who would have thunk it? But it's fabulous! If you're interested they have sample recipes on the web site at - http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3031321

The book is "The No Fad Diet" It really works well - my hubby is even happy with the recipes. Doesn't even realize he is eating healthy! We also started using the Barilla Plus pasta. It is kind of a compromise between regular and whole wheat.

Blueberry
08-17-2005, 10:42 AM
It has these really great recipes that sound totally weird but somehow everything just turns out tasting really great! Like putting shredded zucchini into meatloaf!

Allie1DukeFn-

I have to second the recommendations for the heart association cookbooks! I have an older one that I purchased off ebay which is wonderful!

I have used the zucchini trick with some frequency, though I don't think this cookbook is where I got the idea. One of my favorite treats are zucchini turkey burgers. Shred a zucchini, add ground turkey, an egg and I add some terryaki sauce. Delicious! I'd rather have those than a "real burger" any day!

If only eating healthy didn't cost more and take up so much more time, I'd be all set!

Trekhawk
08-17-2005, 01:23 PM
[QUOTE=Jenc]I am in need of losing a minimum of about 20 lbs and a maximum of about 50 lbs.

Make sure you always eat breakfast. This is one thing I have heard over the years and always do myself or can't function but I noticed it mentioned again in this months Bicycling mag.

It states " according to the National Weight Control registry, a database of rock-star dieters who've lost weight and kept it off for three years or more, this is the only thing virtually all sucessful losers do.

Good luck :D

Dogmama
08-18-2005, 04:18 AM
Don't forget to add weight training. The majority of the calories burned are used during every day activities (basal metabolism.) Muscle requires more calories to simply exist. So, by adding weight training, not only are you fighting osteoporosis, looking better nekked, but also adding fat burning muscle.

Allie1DukeFn
08-18-2005, 05:13 AM
Do you try to focus on upper body and abs for the weights and let the bike take care of the lower? I did one of my tapes on Tuesday that I ~thought~ was mostly upper body, but I must have been wrong because I could barely walk Tuesday and Wednesday. DH kept saying it was the biking - but after 3 weeks - I hadn't felt like that so why all of a sudden would I? I think the weights and the biking was just too much.

I did a 20 minute Yoga tape yesterday and made myself go out on the bike - actually really helped to loosen everything back up again. I'm still a little tight this morning - but not too bad.

Definitely need to find something that is strictly upper body!

oldbikah
08-18-2005, 06:04 AM
[QUOTE=Allie1DukeFn]I actually went to a nutrionist to help me with weight loss. One of the best things she did was do the test to determine my resting metabolic rate. Basically how many calories my body will burn in a day if I do nothing but sit on my rear end. Mine was 1,700. QUOTE]

That is great! I have never been to a nutrionist and would love to know HOW the metabolic rate is actually tested. This summer I have been following weight watchers and have lost 20 pounds so far, 10 more to go. I agree wholeheartedly with all the dieters who say "eat little, and often" as it makes a huge difference to me, plus the concept "no exercise, no weight loss". Also I do not find that it costs me anymore $ to eat healthy. Junk food ain't cheap!

The Weight Watchers website also has some good recipes anyone would like, and they are all generally easy to do.

Allie1DukeFn
08-18-2005, 06:24 AM
You have to fast for 4 hours before you do it. There is this little machine you breath into for I think it is about 15 minutes. The machine records something from how you're breathing in a resting state and then does the calculation. I've got a brochure at home - I'll see if it gives any more technical details about the process and post.

Dogmama
08-18-2005, 06:59 AM
Do you try to focus on upper body and abs for the weights and let the bike take care of the lower?
Definitely need to find something that is strictly upper body!

During peak riding seasons, I'll do one day/week of nothing but legs and upper body the other times (~ 2-3X/week). Riding doesn't really hit hamstrings or calves and muscle imbalances can lead to problems. My leg work has no direct quad work during peak riding seasons; I focus on glutes, hams and calves.

Legs are big muscles. Even a little more work than usual will make them sore.

Helen
09-19-2005, 06:21 AM
You have to fast for 4 hours before you do it. There is this little machine you breath into for I think it is about 15 minutes. The machine records something from how you're breathing in a resting state and then does the calculation. I've got a brochure at home - I'll see if it gives any more technical details about the process and post.

You have to take into consideration that this calculation can change rapidly depending on your main body factors differences. Even a slight change in your lifestlye can result in a different metabolical factor.

Trekhawk
09-29-2005, 02:34 PM
What is the optimal time period between the time we wake up and the time we should eat breakfast.
I often forget about it (because of my morning e-mails ;) ) and remember to eat it later (after an hour or so). :o

Hi Cristina - sorry not sure on that one. My routine is to eat as soon as I get up then move on with the rest of the day. This seems to work for me and I find I have heaps of energy until lunch if necessary. :)

LBTC
09-29-2005, 09:44 PM
mmmmmm breakfast

mornings are: brush hair and put in pony tail, wash face, apply oils and lotions, put clothes on, walk dogs, make dogs and cats fresh food, mix favourite juices together, give the cat his pill, let the dogs outside, eat breakfast, which is currently a small amount of Mueslix (yummy) with a sliced banana and a whole whack of prune activia yogurt (stepped away from the soy milk after the "stomach flu" last week and really like the yogurt on cereal thing). I'm usually eating about an hour after I get out of bed. heh After that, I make my lunch, hide dog cookies all over the house, change into my working clothes, then walk to work. All told, I have to be out of bed about 2 hours before I need to be at work and you'll notice I don't do makeup, don't have a shower in the morning, and I do so very little with my hair!! heehee

I think an hour after waking up is really good timing for eating breakfast. My only rule is that I eat breakfast before I really go out. When I broke my shoulder riding to work a bunch of years ago, I used to not eat breakfast until about 10:00 in the morning, 2 hours after I started work. As a result, I went about 27 hours without food and with virtually nothing to drink....and the surgery was still 24 hours after that! Lesson learned. You never know what will happen on the way to work!!

Now....if I could only follow my own advice and stay away from the hot chocolate at work.....maybe I could stop growing this silly "beer" belly!

Namaste,
~T~

Trekhawk
09-30-2005, 07:57 AM
[QUOTE=LBTC)Now....if I could only follow my own advice and stay away from the hot chocolate at work.....maybe I could stop growing this silly "beer" belly!
Namaste,
~T~[/QUOTE]

mmmm did someone mention hot chocolate. Yummy who could resist that. :)

LBTC
09-30-2005, 08:32 AM
mmmm did someone mention hot chocolate. Yummy who could resist that. :)

yes. and my employers provide it for free in the lunch room. the b*****ds!!
:eek:

~T~

RoadRaven
09-30-2005, 01:20 PM
I get up, have a glass of cool/cold water (to kick start metabolism), do half hour low impact aerobics, tai chi or stretching if time (bump metabolism again) mooch about a while... have brekky (something like toast with banana and peanut butter, or toast and eggs - most important to provide a small ammount of fuel to start ones day) about 3/4 hour after exercise (or at least an hour after getting up if there was no time to exercise) and then head off to work...

I work really hard at eating a minimal ammount in the evening...

Dogmama
10-01-2005, 07:51 PM
mmmmmm breakfast

which is currently a small amount of Mueslix (yummy) with a sliced banana and a whole whack of prune activia yogurt (stepped away from the soy milk after the "stomach flu" last week and really like the yogurt on cereal thing). ~T~

What is prune activia yogurt?

RoadRaven
10-01-2005, 09:20 PM
BTW: I keep hearing about this tai chi stuff but I don't know what it is unfortunately. Can you give me a detailed explanation of its purposes please ? Thanks.


Tai chi is like martial arts in slow-mo... think kung fu or jujitsu but reeeeeeally slow.

It is aggressive in form, but not a martial art you fight with.

You work on breathing and centring your body and your thoughts. Your balance improves and I always feel more able to cope with my working week if I have had an hours concentrated tai chi during the week.

Because you move so slowly, you get a great large muscle workout - but although your body heats up, most people don't break a sweat cause it is not aerobic.

Its a wonderful all-over stretch routine too... see if you can find someone to teach you - I have learned through night classes with one of the local schools.

LBTC
10-01-2005, 10:48 PM
What is prune activia yogurt?

Activia is a brand of yogurt with live bacteria....prune is the unusual, but delicious flavour!

yum!
~T~

Dogmama
10-02-2005, 05:08 AM
Activia - I don't think we have it in the colonies - at least not over here in the desert.

Thanks for the explanation!

Helen
10-02-2005, 10:29 AM
Its a wonderful all-over stretch routine too... see if you can find someone to teach you - I have learned through night classes with one of the local schools.

So I guess that it can't be learned from the internet or books right ???
You said it helps you to cope with your work. Do you mean like is relaxing you or what ?

LBTC
10-02-2005, 11:02 AM
Interesting you mention this yogurt. I recently spoke to one of the best doctors in my town and he said that Activia doesn't appear to have any of their advertised effects. Its just marketing you know ... :(

I suppose that could be, however, I have traditionally hated yogurt, seriously not enjoyed it at all. And many of the newer yogurts that are out there are sweetened with aspartame or splenda which are very hard on my system, so I can't eat those at all. I hope that your doctor simply doesn't have the best information, but, even if he does, I'm really enjoying this brand!

Namaste,
~T~

ps...everything we buy is just marketing

Trekhawk
10-02-2005, 12:57 PM
I suppose that could be, however, I have traditionally hated yogurt, seriously not enjoyed it at all. And many of the newer yogurts that are out there are sweetened with aspartame or splenda which are very hard on my system, so I can't eat those at all. I hope that your doctor simply doesn't have the best information, but, even if he does, I'm really enjoying this brand!
Namaste,
~T~
ps...everything we buy is just marketing

LBTC - another way to enjoy plain natural yoghurt is to put it on toast. You spread honey first and then add a spoon or two of natural yoghurt and spread over the top - yummy.
I think this is from the Pritiken (spelling?) Diet, I have not used this diet but I knew a runner who had and put me onto the toast and yoghurt thing.

latelatebloomer
10-02-2005, 05:49 PM
I never liked yogurt much unless it had enough honey and goodies in it to cancel out its benefits - until I had some yogurt when we were honeymooning in Greece. It was so much richer and deeper in flavor, almost more like creme fraiche. I approximate it by lining a colander with cheesecloth and dumping lowfat or nonfat Stonyfield in there and letting it sit overnight. I'm sure it's higher calorically, but I'd rather cut the portion and enjoy it more.

By the way, Tai chi was really my gateway to getting in touch with my very ignored body. My husband and I were both dealing with a lot of emotional/physical stress, and we started taking classes together. We left it behind for more strenuous workouts and yoga, but I like knowing that it's there for me when I am older or want a change. It's very grounding and fluid, and my husband found it was the only kind of meditation that worked for him - because it kept his body engaged in the process, too.

DirtDiva
10-02-2005, 05:52 PM
Mmmmm... Greek yoghurt and honey... :D

RoadRaven
10-02-2005, 09:03 PM
So I guess that it can't be learned from the internet or books right ???
You said it helps you to cope with your work. Do you mean like is relaxing you or what ?

Hi there Helen
I actually replied to this at length this morning, but the internet locked up on me, so will try and recreate what I wrote this morning... here goes...

How does tai chi help me cope with work... well, the best I can explain is that it "grounds" me. you have to focus on your breathing, and your balance, and shut out other thoughts... I guess some might talk about focusing on one's chakras... some might talk about universal energy entering through the top of your head and leaving through your feet... I think about it as reconnecting with the Goddess... however you think about it, the beginning of tai chi (sometimes spelt tai qi) is very much like meditation.

As you begin the form itself, you have to stay very focussed, so you tend to shut out all the peripheral stuff to being in the "right here and now"... you don't consider where the kids have to dropped off, whats for dinner, what your husband said, the deadline for the boss... nothing. You just focus on breathing and moving your body very slowly...

So, I find, when I have centred and grounded myself in this way - whether through a stretch routine, through tai chi or through meditation, I just find several days worth of stress seems much easier to cope with as the days wear on. And they do wear on... the expectations that we (as women) can hold down a job, hold together the family, look great, cook and clean for a household etc etc etc are huge from western society and it does wear us down.

I find this form of relaxation and meditation - as well as cycling/training - valid ways to ensure I have "me" time. And for some weird reason, women (in the western world) do tend to have to justify time they spend just on themselves...

But these forms of exercise increase my energy as well as my calm... and they make me a better person, as well as modelling the importance of aerobis activity, and self reflection to my children.

I hope this answers what you were asking. It doesn't seem to look like what I wrote earlier today... :cool:

RoadRaven
10-02-2005, 09:10 PM
Oh, and Helen, I forgot to say you can learn this from the net/books etc ... but it is very hard.

Often aerobics video tapes will be done in mirror image, but not tai chi - left and right are very important, so looking at/deciphering photos or video involve a bit of brain gym.

Also, it is good to have others there to help you with breathing and posture (though big windows give an ideal reflection if you are watching yourself).

I recommend joining a group and learning with a master... it is very individualistic - no talking through out really - just the instructions or encouragement from your leader/master... but very good to be part of the group while you are getting used to it.

Once you have mastered the form you are taught you can take it anywhere.

I do it in the park, in my garden, by the ocean, and people are so used to this kind of thing now I never get a funny look.

Good luck with it, hope you get a chance to try it and you enjoy it...

Bustertb
10-03-2005, 08:25 AM
Because of some health issues, I have to be focused on my health more than I would like. But the good side of that is that I exercise and try to stay in good shape. I have noticed that alot of the women I know from church and other places are very focused on their children, sometimes to the point of really 'letting themselves go'. It might be my imagination, but sometimes I get the feeling that although they think I look great, I get the feeling a part of them thinks I'm either a. obsessive about it, or b. self-centered.

Because of my health I have decided not to have children, so I know I'm a little disconnected when it comes to understanding 'their' side. I know many of you have a family so I was wondering if you have a different opinion or have any of you ever felt the same way?

Helen
10-04-2005, 08:28 AM
I recommend joining a group and learning with a master... it is very individualistic - no talking through out really - just the instructions or encouragement from your leader/master... but very good to be part of the group while you are getting used to it.

Good luck with it, hope you get a chance to try it and you enjoy it...

Thanks RoadRaven. So tahat you know, I already joined a group and I am very anxious to start my first Tai Chi lesson.

Do you often practice at home ?

RoadRaven
10-04-2005, 11:25 AM
Do I practice at home, Helen?
Yes, I do... once you have the form in your head, you can do it anywhere (have even been known to do it in the office when it is mostly empty!)

To begin with though, I had to write the names of the different moves down til they became settled in my head... it is brain gym as well - a full body workout - looking forward to hearing how it goes!

Rakekay
10-05-2005, 07:22 AM
Because of my health I have decided not to have children, so I know I'm a little disconnected when it comes to understanding 'their' side. I know many of you have a family so I was wondering if you have a different opinion or have any of you ever felt the same way?

I do have children, but I also try to take time for myself and concentrate on both my physical and mental well-being. (Although to be honest, concentrating on mental well-being with happy hours with friends, spa days, naps and the like is often more fun that the physical well-being). I've found that if I'm not happy with who *I* am then it's pretty hard to be a good wife and mother. You have to love yourself first.

So, don't feel guilty for spending time on yourself. Your health comes first. I'm sure a lot of those other moms are actually jealous of you rather than looking down on you. My friends often say, "You're my role model for taking care of yourself." I generally hear this after I tell them about a girls weekend I went on or a spa day, of course, rather than after I tell them about a 65-mile bike ride!

Bustertb
10-07-2005, 10:38 PM
Guess I was feeling selfish or self absorbed. Thanks for your reply. Glad to hear you are taking time for yourself. I agree, women need to feel good for themselves so they will be better mothers and wives.

When I've told people I've gone out for a 30 mile ride, just for the fun of it, they look at me like I'm crazy. Of course my idea of a night out isn't Chucky Cheese! Different things for different people ;)

Rakekay
10-08-2005, 06:05 PM
Trust me. A 30-mile ride is a hell of a lot more fun than a night at Chuck E. Cheese. (Years ago I told my husband that any trips to Chuck E. Cheese with the girls were his domain. I refuse to go there!)

Bustertb
10-09-2005, 01:19 PM
Trust me. A 30-mile ride is a hell of a lot more fun than a night at Chuck E. Cheese. (Years ago I told my husband that any trips to Chuck E. Cheese with the girls were his domain. I refuse to go there!)


Isn't that the demographic for Chuck E. Cheese, small children and men!? :D :D

Helen
10-11-2005, 07:36 AM
Do I practice at home, Helen?
Yes, I do... once you have the form in your head, you can do it anywhere (have even been known to do it in the office when it is mostly empty!)

How long does it take for a normal person to learn at least one form ?

I remember our trainer saying that we shouldn't come to this course with a goal in mind but I really want to get more flexibile and to strengthen my muscles.

RoadRaven
10-17-2005, 11:59 AM
Cristina... I mean brain gym, because Tai Chi is made up of a series of moves... you have to remember each of these moves as patterns, and eventually you fit them together, then you add on... its about memory - what form, what pattern, where to put weight on which foot... its not just bouncing up and down to music like aerobics (which i enjoy and is fun) - there is a huge ammount of focus and concentration involved in tai chi... fantastic...



When I started learning, Helen, I knew nothing, and going once a week for 1 1/2 hours a class was enough, we'd learn something each week, practice at home, and join it to something we knew, or begin something knew the next week

have a go, its great...

Helen
10-21-2005, 08:58 AM
When I started learning, Helen, I knew nothing, and going once a week for 1 1/2 hours a class was enough, we'd learn something each week, practice at home, and join it to something we knew, or begin something knew the next week have a go, its great...

I am going twice a week for 2 or 2 1/2 hours a class. How often do you practice at home ? Do you practice all the exercises or just the forms ?

RoadRaven
10-21-2005, 12:10 PM
Cristina, my understanding is that there are so many parts to each form because tai chi is a form of meditation.

Are you learning from a master?

S/he should be getting you to ground yourself/focus on your chakras/feel the energy of the earth/ whatever imagery s/he uses...

You should begin by focusing your mind, and then you take your body through these movements and eventually you should flow through them like a river, unthinking, molding yourself into each movement with ease like the river does over the stones and the river-banks.

To begin with, tai chi is brain gym because alot of it is rmembering, but as the movements become part of your muscle memory, then you can really begin to focus on just yourself and it becomes a moving meditation.

Great that you are feeling more flexible already... its an "easier" option for flexibility than yoga, I think. The other thing you should find improving is you balance and awareness of how your body fits and moves and space in your everyday life.

Helen, how often do I practice? - I try and do it every day - and I will work on bits I am unfamiliar with when necessary, but tend to try and do the whole form.

With new parts to the form, you should practice that piece within an hour of finishing your class, again within the 24 hours of finishing your class, and again within 3 days. That just helps to cement the new movements into your muscle memory.

I assume you are both enjoying it? Its not everyones cuppa but I get so much from it.

Helen
10-28-2005, 04:20 AM
I assume you are both enjoying it? Its not everyones cuppa but I get so much from it.

Of course I am enjoying it although I would have learned much faster if I had a little more spare time.

RoadRaven
10-28-2005, 11:55 AM
LOL... yeah Cristina... being impatient in tai chi defeats some of its purpose...

So its giving you a disposition workouty as well as body and brain!

So pleased you are both enjoying it