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surgtech1956
08-18-2007, 03:12 PM
I'm thinking about this for a fall/winter exercise routine. I don't know anything about spinning/spin classes. There aren't any spin classes in my town, there is at the YMCA in the city where I work. Is this something that's not too popular? Do most of you have your own spin bike at home or go to a spin class? Anyone teach spin classes?

Veronica
08-18-2007, 03:33 PM
Spinning is very popular at the gyms around here. I've done both classes and videos at home. For burning calories, the classes are great. I also really enjoyed the camaraderie. I like the convenience factor of videos and I think the workouts tend to have a more specific focus - climbing, strength, technique, etc. Of course that will vary from instructor to instructor.

V.

KnottedYet
08-18-2007, 03:47 PM
I've never taken a spin class, and I don't own a spin bike. But the classes sound like fun, and I know a lot of people get a kick out of them.

Why not give it a try? Could be great!

Zen
08-18-2007, 04:10 PM
Wow.
I can't believe there are no spin classes local to you.
I have two spin bikes (anybody wanna buy one cheap?) but I mostly take classes.
Just like road riding in a group, I put in more effort in group spin.
You can probably take the classes without joining the Y.
Spinning has improved both my aerobic endurance and climbing skills.
DO IT!

KnottedYet
08-18-2007, 04:16 PM
surgtech, where ARE you?

Jackson, Lansing, all have spin I'm sure. Hayes Green Beach in Charlotte probably doesn't, but if you dash down to Battle Creek you could spin to your heart's content. You can't be more than 20 minutes from a town with a spin class! Even if you're in Wacousta, fer chrissakes! (there is NOTHING in Wacousta, y'all!)

Get ahold of the Tri-County bicycle assoc, they will be able to tell you what spin classes are in your area.

Are you still looking for GF 2.0? You might find her in a spin class.

Starfish
08-18-2007, 04:56 PM
What everyone said! ;)

I haven't done a lot of spinning, but I intend to do a bunch this winter (in the gym in a class). Just the little I did this spring (thanks Veronica!!) DID help both my leg strength and my higher end HR fitness. Really helped for out of the saddle climbing, too.

And, fun!

I also have a trainer at home for the road bike, but I need to invest in some videos. I have a hard time making myself just ride and ride the trainer without outside motivation. Although, just spinning on the trainer for a 1/2 hour in the morning is easy to get in. I'm planning on that this winter to up my a.m. metabolism.

surgtech1956
08-18-2007, 05:02 PM
There's a spin class at the YMCA in the town I work - this is 30 mins from my home. Lansing is 1 1/2 hrs south-west of me.

han-grrl
08-18-2007, 10:32 PM
I teach spin classes, and they are pretty popular around this area. The bikes are expensive to buy and maintain so some gyms may not really feel like investing in them.

For my own training, i use the trainer at home, mostly because of timing, i don't work out while i teach, and i can't always make it for certain class times.

Trek420
08-19-2007, 07:19 AM
There's a spin class at the YMCA in the town I work - this is 30 mins from my home.

Hey, you could ride there! :D

I spin and have a Cycleops. I don't have the videos so don't do structured workouts at home, just something to do while watching TV or a way to ride on a rainy day.

DrBadger
08-19-2007, 08:36 PM
Did you search spefically for spin classes called that? Because "spinning" is actually a trademarked name for a specific company. The classes I take at my Y are called "indoor cycling". It is the same thing as true "spinning", it's just the the instuctors and programs aren't necessaraly trained by or from the company that trademarked "spinning".

If there is a class at the Y in the town where you work would you be able to fit that class in either before or after work? I currently spin at least twice a week before going into school and I love it. I can't believe how much stronger it has made me on the bike, and now I can actually do standing climbs which I couldn't do before.

Good luck finding a class!

Bike Goddess
08-20-2007, 07:55 AM
Ditto for what PA Badger says about spinning and strength training. I've said this before and I'll say it again: I've been in spin classes for the past 7 months since I was off the bike for 8 (months)due to a broken humerus.

I was cleared to cycle outdoors again two weeks ago and have ridden over 200 miles. If I hadn't been doing spin, I never could have rebounded as quickly. I now need to work on endurance as I get tired after about 40 miles.

My suggestion is that you do spin at least twice a week if not more. If you are unable to ride outside do more work inside. I was up to 4x a week at the gym. I've even done back to back classes to increase my endurance.

It's up to you to push yourself in these classes. There aren't any numbers on the knobs, just increased tension as you move them up. Start easy and gradually increase the tension as you become stronger. :) :) :)

BikerDar
09-05-2007, 06:11 PM
Hey there! I credit Indoor Cycling with really improving my overall cycling ability and keeping me fairly bike fit year round. I've been a road cyclist for years (and years and years) and started 'spinning' regularly about seven years ago. My bike fitness and ability SOARED. Now I teach INDOOR CYCLING at my local Y. Be careful what you refer to as Spinning or the JohnnyG/MadDogg police will come after you. ;)
Only gyms that pay a fee to MadDogg are allowed to call their programs SPINNING. Some Y's pay the fee and are licensed to call their programs SPIN, but many are not, so it's called Indoor Cycling.

I don't know if I'd spend the money on a bike for home use. If I'm gonna train at home, it's going to be on my bike with my trainer and the bke, that fits me perfectly. No spin bike is gonna fit as well as your own, the adjustments just aren't that fine.

Any time on a bike is a good time though!

surgtech1956
09-05-2007, 06:22 PM
Thanks for the input. The Y in the city I work offers a 40 minute 'spinning class' - thats what they're calling it. This is my 'first' year back cycling and want to continue a fitness program from Oct - Jan - till some cross country skiing and back to cycling in March/April. I was also thinking of pilates.

Zen
09-05-2007, 06:27 PM
Spinning is like Xerox or Kleenex. It's a generic term at this point.

aicabsolut
09-06-2007, 03:31 PM
Spinning is like Xerox or Kleenex. It's a generic term at this point.

hah!... neither of which are technically generic.

Zen
09-06-2007, 05:00 PM
WordNet - Cite This Source
generic

adjective
1. relating to or common to or descriptive of all members of a genus; "the generic name"

aicabsolut
09-07-2007, 02:53 PM
Yes, but according to trademark law, neither Kleenex nor Xerox have committed "genericide," as opposed to Thermos, for example. Technically, the generic terms remain "photocopier" and "facial tissue."

AmyO
09-09-2007, 03:58 PM
Spinning introduced me to cycling. I know it's been around for a long time, but just took it up about 3 years ago and loved it. The energy and camaraderie is fantastic and it helps if you have a motivating instructor. Between a couple of instructors and new friends I've made at class, I now know a bunch of people who ride.

I'm new to riding a "real" bike, but I find much of what's taught in a good spin class is transferable to the road, especially if taught by someone who also rides. The muscles and many of the techniques used are comparable.

Now, getting used to riding a bike that actually moves, that takes practice!

teigyr
09-10-2007, 10:02 AM
Spinning introduced me to cycling. I know it's been around for a long time, but just took it up about 3 years ago and loved it. The energy and camaraderie is fantastic and it helps if you have a motivating instructor. Between a couple of instructors and new friends I've made at class, I now know a bunch of people who ride.

I'm new to riding a "real" bike, but I find much of what's taught in a good spin class is transferable to the road, especially if taught by someone who also rides. The muscles and many of the techniques used are comparable.

Now, getting used to riding a bike that actually moves, that takes practice!

I go to spin (or in my gym it's 24Cycle) class in the winter. I think it's an excellent way to get in shape or keep in shape for the bike! I try to set up my seat and handlebars to emulate my bike, I know the instructors want the bars a bit higher but the cyclists and tri people lower them a bit. You can always tell the tri people because they go into aero position during sprints :D I also think there are things you can do in class that you wouldn't do on the road...ie push yourself to your absolute limit. In real life on a moving bike, you'd have to worry about things like making it home if you got too worn out.

I think spin bikes are a good chance to get used to clipless pedals also. I know in my gym they use SPD compatible pedals.

surgtech1956
09-11-2007, 05:22 PM
What do you wear to spin in????

tygab
09-11-2007, 05:54 PM
I go to spin (or in my gym it's 24Cycle) class in the winter. I think it's an excellent way to get in shape or keep in shape for the bike! I try to set up my seat and handlebars to emulate my bike, I know the instructors want the bars a bit higher but the cyclists and tri people lower them a bit. You can always tell the tri people because they go into aero position during sprints :D I also think there are things you can do in class that you wouldn't do on the road...ie push yourself to your absolute limit. In real life on a moving bike, you'd have to worry about things like making it home if you got too worn out.

I think spin bikes are a good chance to get used to clipless pedals also. I know in my gym they use SPD compatible pedals.

Agree, in spin class you can push yourself pretty hard. I went to spin class last night for the first time in months (sigh, goodbye fair summer eves...). There was a newbie in the class and after she was done she expressed how much harder it was than she thought it would be. I think a lot of people assume you go and mindlessly pedal for an hour (like sitting on a exer-bike while reading, instead you listen to music). Nooope.

Of course, you could take it easy too and should if one ever feels too taxed or has an injury etc. But there are no stop signs, no cars to slow down for, no pretty fields to look at, and any number of other things that may distract me on the bike. I focus on the music, the instructor, and making the most of the hour that I have to do the class so I tend to push pretty hard.

@Surgtech, wear what you feel comfortable with. Personally, I wear cycling shorts and clipless shoes, with usually a mesh tech type workout shirt. Some folks even wear cycling shirts, others wear regular shorts and t-shirts with running shoes. I find that the spin bike seats are even less comfortable than a road saddle so cycling shorts it is, and I no longer like cotton if any perspiration is involved. I also wear a heart rate monitor. Most people in my classes also bring small towels to put over the bars to mop up sweat as needed.

tulip
09-11-2007, 08:32 PM
What do you wear to spin in????

and bring lots of water or sports drink. We sweat alot and it's important to stay hydrated. Drink a bottle after the class, too (and eat something). It's an intense workout.

teigyr
09-12-2007, 12:41 PM
I wear worn out (or less padded) cycling shorts. The saddles aren't comfortable at all but all the padding in the world won't help that. I also wear a sports bra and t-shirt. I use my HRM too...along with several people in the spin class.

One of the instructors at my gym is really great and she will push you if you're not feeling too motivated. She also realizes (for the people who are training for something) when we're fatigued or wanting to scale back a bit and she looks the other way.

Oh also I got some cheaper road bike shoes and put SPD cleats on them. You can wear tennis/workout shoes and many people do but it hurts my feet because the soles feel "floppy".

It IS amazing in how difficult it is. One of the instructors remarked that a good spin (or cycle) class can burn more calories than any other class they offered. What's great fun is when the DH/BF's come in and think it's a "fun class that the little woman takes". I've seen some of them walk out in the middle and not come back :D

aicabsolut
09-12-2007, 04:45 PM
Yeah, on a hard intervals day, I can burn 700 calories an hour easy. Sometimes I need at least 2 bottles of water and a gel to get me pushing hard until the end (in a 75 min class or 2 back to back classes--those 50 min classes are for wussy...i'm not even warmed up yet).

tygab
09-12-2007, 05:46 PM
I wear worn out (or less padded) cycling shorts. The saddles aren't comfortable at all but all the padding in the world won't help that.


True, teigyr, I wear my least padded ones for classes, but cycling shorts still. I don't need a lot of padding, maybe it's more to prevent the sliding that happens when I've worn regular gym shorts!

solobiker
09-14-2007, 04:19 PM
I did spinning classes for several years and absolutely loved them. I had to stop due to a back injury. I recently bought a LeMond spin bike and have been doing some spinervals. They are a good work out but not as much fun as going to the classes if you have a good instructor.

surgtech1956
09-15-2007, 07:24 AM
The YMCA in the town where I work has 'spin classes'. My work schedule is going to change to 9a-5p and there is a spin class at 7:30a 2 days a week that will work. I wish it was 3 days a week. I'm going to try a 'drop in' class before I sign up for a membership. I guess 2 days a week is better than nothing. Unfortunately, the cold temps are fast approaching here in Michigan.

Zeek
09-27-2007, 11:17 AM
Yeah, on a hard intervals day, I can burn 700 calories an hour easy. Sometimes I need at least 2 bottles of water and a gel to get me pushing hard until the end (in a 75 min class or 2 back to back classes--those 50 min classes are for wussy...i'm not even warmed up yet).

This "wussy" enjoys the 50 minute spinning classes. It's great to keep your cardio going in the colder months, and just as others here have said, it's also about the comaraderie and cohesiveness of the class. Also as stated, it definitely is important to have a knowledgeable and motivating instructor.

teigyr
09-27-2007, 12:52 PM
I'm another 50 minute spin wussy. The way I see it is I can integrate it into other workouts; on spin days I will also swim, run, or do weights. By taking two spin classes, I am losing something. When an instructor wants me to sprint or go to a high exertion level, I can't keep that up for two classes. I work at that moment in time at the highest exertion level I can. For multi-hour training, I work at a different level.

I know sometimes there are 90 minute classes which would be fun. One class designed for the whole 90 minutes (or 120) I would do. The class would be designed for that length of time instead of going through two warm-ups and two back to back identical workouts. If that makes sense :D

jae5
10-03-2007, 06:36 PM
Please help,
I have been spinning for the last two years. I joined a new gym (the YMCA) and the teacher has us do position 3 seated! You NEVER do position 3 seated. The first time I stood up, but she told me to sit, now evey class since then she picks on me, to move my hands up to the very end (in position 3 seated, I am only 5'3)
How do I let this teacher know that you don't do position 3 seated. She can't be a certified instructor.
Help.....thank you

Zeek
10-10-2007, 01:20 PM
Please help,
I have been spinning for the last two years. I joined a new gym (the YMCA) and the teacher has us do position 3 seated! You NEVER do position 3 seated. The first time I stood up, but she told me to sit, now evey class since then she picks on me, to move my hands up to the very end (in position 3 seated, I am only 5'3)
How do I let this teacher know that you don't do position 3 seated. She can't be a certified instructor.
Help.....thank you

Hello jae5,
Instructors such as this irk me to no end. You are correct, she likely isn't certified or was certified many years ago and has interpreted things in her own way.

Here is a document you can print out and hand to her. It is from the spinning.com website. And remember, just because she tells you to sit down doesn't mean you have to. If she is instructing the students to perform unsafe moves, take it to her director. I wouldn't take her class any longer. I would look for another instructor that is certified.

Here you go: