PDA

View Full Version : Probably won't be riding or posting much...



Popoki_Nui
10-25-2006, 09:11 PM
Not that I'm particularly productive here anyway...:rolleyes: ..., but my mother-in-law suffered a stroke Monday morning. Thank heavens I was home to hear her call for help. She is in hospital now, and while not as bad as some CVA's, her stroke has left her pretty messed up. At this point we still have no clear idea how much damage was done, how permanent that damage is, or what recovery might be.
Anyway....my partner and I have lots to do to care for her, as well as keep our household afloat, so riding and posting here has moved waaaay down the list of priorities.

See ya when I can.

Sherry.

salsabike
10-25-2006, 09:15 PM
Please know that we'll be thinking about you and your family...

LBTC
10-25-2006, 09:47 PM
Lots of positive energy to you and your mom and your family, Sherry. Butterflies, too

Stop by and post when you need a sanity break, and let us know how things are going.

Hugs,
~T~

Grog
10-26-2006, 07:32 AM
Good luck Sherry, I will be thinking of you and your family.

pooks
10-26-2006, 07:36 AM
Good luck, Sherry. I'm where you are, only with my mil, it was heart attack followed by complications. We're still back and forth to the hospital (she's been there a week this time, and I'll be going up to stay with her in an hour or so).

Don't forget to take care of YOU, and that does include finding time to get a ride in now and then. You'll need to burn off the tension and blow out the cobwebs!

(hugs!)

Duck on Wheels
10-26-2006, 03:24 PM
Good luck, Sherry. I'm where you are, only with my mil, it was heart attack followed by complications. We're still back and forth to the hospital (she's been there a week this time, and I'll be going up to stay with her in an hour or so).

Don't forget to take care of YOU, and that does include finding time to get a ride in now and then. You'll need to burn off the tension and blow out the cobwebs!

(hugs!)

Ditto. And you'll also need to stay in shape. Caring for an adult after a stroke is hard work physically as well as emotionally. Getting a few miles in now and then to stretch out, warm up, limber up, etc. can be helpful. But don't let me scare you off from taking on the job. It's also time well spent. Good luck to all three of you. Oh, and take heart! Strokes that get immediate care now have far better prognoses than they used to; hospital staff have learned what to do in those first few minutes and hours to minimize damage and what to do from then on to speed recovery.

chickwhorips
10-26-2006, 03:52 PM
big hugs to you and your family. http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i295/fairie1323/grouphugg.gif

Bikingmomof3
10-26-2006, 04:09 PM
Prayers for you and your family.

bcipam
10-26-2006, 05:21 PM
My best friend just went through this with his mother. At first things looked bleak and he was quite depressed. But after some time and physical he is so much better. She can now walk (with a walker) and get about. Her speech is better and she can use her hands. Her future looks good.

I pray that He keep you and your family healthy and well to help care for your mother. I pray also that the good Lord watch over your mother and help her heal.

Take care.

BleeckerSt_Girl
10-26-2006, 05:56 PM
My mother (in her 80's) had a major stroke a couple years before she died in August. It's really amazing to me how much someone might slowly work their way back from a huge stroke. Don't be discouraged yet with your MIL, my mother recovered a great deal from hers, she continued progressing from her stroke for maybe a year and a half before other problems ended her life- it does take time though, and the improvements are small enough so you don't notice them except month by month. Good Luck, and take care of YOURSELF too.

uk elephant
10-28-2006, 12:28 AM
Just thought I'd share the amazing story I heard a couple of weeks ago. I was at a wedding with BF who was best man so I was stuck just chatting with random strangers (didn't know anyone there except BF and the bride and groom). One couple I was talking to were very much into hiking/mountain climbing. They travelled all over the world hiking up big mountains. Both were in their 70's. They had also taken up downhill skiing at the age of 50. Both looked super fit and healthy. Turns out the husband had had a stroke only a year ago, quite a severe one. But just this summer he had made it up to his first mountain summit after the stroke. It had taken him a lot longer than it used to (though still quicker than I've ever been able to), but he was very excited to be back. And he was now ready to go skiing again (though his wife had decided she was now finally too old) as they were off on a skiing holiday this winter with the kids and grandkids.

massbikebabe
10-28-2006, 07:31 AM
Get her into physical/occupational therapy as soon as possible. It did wonders for me.




karen
stroked at 42

Popoki_Nui
10-28-2006, 07:55 AM
Thanks so much for the good wishes for my m-i-l Eileen. At this point it's still not clear how this will play out. Her stroke wasn't particularly severe, but the complications could well be. The stroke has affected her swallowing; she must be fed thru a nasal tube, and if she doesn't regain her ability to swallow she will have to be fed thru a tube directly into her stomach. Related to this, she is at extremely high risk for pneumonia. Her right arm and leg are still non-functioning. On the plus side, she is slowly getting movement back in her right leg (reflex only, but it's a start), and the stroke has not impaired her mental functioning at all. She's still sharp as a tack and retains her wicked sense of humour.
Thanks again. Will update later if you'd like.

Sherry and family.

edit: yes, she does have a physiotherapist and occupational therapist visiting her daily, as well as her PCP, a top neurologist, and about a jillion other amazing nurses and support staff.

BleeckerSt_Girl
10-28-2006, 08:23 AM
Thanks so much for the good wishes for my m-i-l Eileen. At this point it's still not clear how this will play out. Her stroke wasn't particularly severe, but the complications could well be. The stroke has affected her swallowing; she must be fed thru a nasal tube, and if she doesn't regain her ability to swallow she will have to be fed thru a tube directly into her stomach. Related to this, she is at extremely high risk for pneumonia. Her right arm and leg are still non-functioning. On the plus side, she is slowly getting movement back in her right leg (reflex only, but it's a start), and the stroke has not impaired her mental functioning at all. She's still sharp as a tack and retains her wicked sense of humour.
Thanks again. Will update later if you'd like.

Sherry and family.

edit: yes, she does have a physiotherapist and occupational therapist visiting her daily, as well as her PCP, a top neurologist, and about a jillion other amazing nurses and support staff.

Sherry, all this sounds pretty promising. The nasal feeding tude is common, and my mother completely relearned how to swallow and eat again with PT help.
The only reason they might switch the feeding tube to the stomache is that it is very irritating through the nose and will cause nasal problems if in too long. The fact that your mil has some movement in her leg so SOON is great, and if her mind is sharp she sounds like she is going to be doing lots of improving! In one year of recovering, my mother went from being a drooling half asleep shadow slumped over in her wheelchair back to being able to sit upright, smile, feed herself, talk, and walk with a walker again briefly (before she got sick with other things). She started out older and with a worse stroke than your MIL, and never did regain any left arm or leg ability. You should have great hopes for your MIL's recovery!! :)

rocknrollgirl
10-28-2006, 11:40 AM
I will keep you in the karma chain. Having been the primary caretaker for my mom for the past three years, I know how hard it can be, physically and emotionally. Be good to yourself too.

I will be thinking of you.....


Ruth

RoadRaven
10-28-2006, 04:48 PM
My thoughts join the others here in warm thoughts for you and your family

Arohanui

Kitsune06
10-28-2006, 04:55 PM
Sherry, I second everyone saying "take you time, too." When my grandmother stroked and we were taking care of her in our home, some of the most important time we had was the time when she was taking PT and everyone could take a little bit of "us" time. Never underestimate the importance of some time for yourself. Biking might hold you together more than you can ever imagine.

latelatebloomer
10-29-2006, 03:26 AM
Our older neighbor had a similar-sounding stroke about 18 months ago, her husband was quite frightened about the extent of the damage and she is doing well (ie: I ran in to her at a garage sale and I forgot she had ever had a stroke) It's great that mil's mind & wit are sharp, and that she has such a fantastic support team. You are all in my prayers - & do give yourself some respite. I don't know what does it for you - music helps me - there are some cd's I seem to "save" for crisis management.

Popoki_Nui
10-29-2006, 06:07 PM
Thanks againe everyone for your good wishes and stories of encouragement. I really appreciate them!
As of tonight, things are kind of weird. 'Mom' seems to have quite a bit of movement in her leg, and even the glimmerings of movement in her arm. BUT, she seems to be slipping cognitively. She didn't recognize me or know where she is, and she's sleeping virtually all the time now.
Talked with her doc; he says now it's just a matter of wait-and-see. Things will either improve, or they won't. The waiting is the hardest.
I know I should take some "me" time....go riding, or even a walk on the beach. Just can't summon up the energy to do it. Maybe next week...


Thanks. :)

~Sherry and family.

Bad JuJu
10-30-2006, 02:38 AM
Ditto what everyone else said, and you just do whatever you can to care for yourself as well as mil and DH. It doesn't have to be cycling, though if you ever can work up the energy for a ride, you may find that it does wonders for your outlook. DH and I have been primary caregivers for both my mom and my dad, at different times, and we found that you have to work just as hard at finding ways to "decompress" yourself as at caregiving. Don't forget to take care of you.

Hoping for a speedy recovery for your mil, and hugs to you.